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October 24, 1909

FOR TAFT BOAT TRIP
DOWN MISSISSIPPI.

KANSAS CITY DELEGATION
WILL LEAVE TONIGHT.

Will Travel to Alton on Four Spe-
cial Cars -- Decorations for the
"Gray Eagle" Sent
Ahead.

Imbued with the "Kansas City Spirit" and a determination to impress upon the big waterways convention at New Orleans the need of improving the Missouri river, the Kansas City delegation will leave for Alton, Ill., at 9 o'clock tonight on four special Pullman cars by way of the Chicago & Alton railway. Decorators were sent to Alton Friday night and by the time the Kansas City delegation arrives tomorrow morning the Gray Eagle, the boat on which the Kansas City delegation will ride, will be one of the gayest in the fleet. At least that was the declaration last night of E. M. Clendening, secretary of the Commercial Club, who has made all of the arrangements for the trip.

Yesterday it seemed very unlikely that President Taft would be able to accept the invitation of the Kansas City delegation to ride at least part of the way down the river on the Gray Eagle. More than a dozen telegrams were exchanged with the management of President Taft's itinerary, but late last night Secretary Clendening was informed that it would be practically impossible. He still hopes that the president will find time to visit the Kansas City boat and take breakfast on the steamer Tuesday morning.

LEAVE ST. LOUIS MONDAY.

The "Gray Eagle" will reach St. Louis at 9 o'clock Monday morning. President Taft will speak in the Coliseum at 11 o'clock. The party will embark at 4 o'clock in the afternoon for the great trip down the river. The fleet arrives at Cape Girardeau at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning, Cairo, Ill., at noon, and Hickman, Ky., at 4 o'clock. Memphis, Tenn., and Helena, Ark., will be the principal stops on Wednesday. Vicksburg will be the only stop of importance on Thursday with Natchez and Baton Rouge on Friday.

The fleet will arrive in New Orleans early Saturday morning and until the following Tuesday night there will be a continuous round of convention work and receptions in the southern city. Grand opera, addresses by the governors of the different states, inspection of the city, and attendance at the convention will take up about all of the time of the Kansas City delegation. The party will leave New Orleans at 6:20 o'clock Tuesday night.

Besides Secretary Clendening, members of the delegation of seventy include Jerome Twitchell, J. H. Neff, Hon. Edgar C. Ellis, C. S. Jobes, H. F. Lang, W. B. C. Brown, C. D. Carlisle, W. G. Mellier and Hon. W. P. Borland.

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November 4, 1908

CONGRESSMAN ELLIS
BEATEN BY BORLAND.

POLITICS TRIUMPHS OVER BUSI-
NESS CONSIDERATIONS.

Restoration of the Missouri River to
the Map Fails to Impress
Voters as a Noteworthy
Achievement.

"I was elected because the whole Democratic ticket was elected. As I view it the improvement of the Missouri river issue had no effect apparently on my vote. It owuld seem from my majority that they can safely intrust legislation of that character to me." -- William P. Boreland

"The unusually large majorities given the entire Democratic ticket can be accepted as the cause for my defeat. It was a veritable landslide, and it naturally struck me with the rest of the candidates on the Republican ticket." -- E. C. Ellis

One of the surprises of the campaign was the election of W. P. Borland to congress from the Fifth Missouri district, Kansas City and Jackson county, over E. C. Ellis, Republican. The commendable and substantial services of Mr. Ellis in four different sessions of the house of representatives at Washington for the Missouri river improvements had made him a favorite with commercial, business and individual interests regardless of party affiliation. They considered him the best equipped to continue the work so auspiciously commenced. Besides, Mr. Ellis had the distinction of having defeated W. S. Cowherd and Judge William H. Wallace in previous campaigns, and either man was considered stronger with the voters than Mr. Borland.

Mr. Ellis made his campaign on his record of having restored the Missouri river to the map of federal consideration. He based his campaign on promises of secucring a large appropriation from the next congress to make the river navigable, and in view of his past successses along these lines it seemed to be the general opinion of business men that he should again be sent back to Washington. While Borland also said in his speeches that he was for the reclamation of the Missouri, still his treatment of the river in his speeches gives little hope of ultimate results. He maintained that river agitation was more a commercial question than political, and he broadened out on national issues and hammered into the ears of his listneres that if Bryan was to be the president he should have in congress men who are in sympathy with his views.

Mr. Borland was born in Leavenworth, Kas., "on the banks of the Missouri," as he used to tell his auditors. While still a small boy he came to Kansas City in 1880 and finished his education in the schools of this city. He graduated from the law department of the University of Michigan, and organized the Kansas City School of Law. He has never before held or aspired to political office, his only public services being in connection with the board of free-holders that revised the city charter.

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November 3, 1908

HADLEY CLOSES
THE CAMPAIGN.

UNPRECEDENTED DEMONSTRA-
TION GREETS CANDIDATE.

KERENS AND WARNER SPEAK.

ROWDIES ATTEMPT TO MAR EN-
THUSIASTIC MEETING.

Mr. Hadley Asks Jackson County and
Kansas City to Give Him
the Majority They Did
Four Years Ago.

The most enthusiastic audience Convention hall has housed this year, with estimates varying from 14,000 to 18,000, welcomed Colonel R. C. Kerens, Republican candidate for the United States senatorial nomination; Congressman E. C. Ellis, candidate for re-election; Selden P. Spencer of St. Louis; United States Senator William Warner of Missouri and Herbert S. Hadley, and helped the latter close his campaign for governor of the state.

Despite an apparently organized attempt to break up the meeting, which broke out three times wile the gubernatorial nominee was speaking, the hall was crowded before the first speaker was introduced.

Near-hysteria had the followers of Hadley, Kerens, Ellis and the balance of the Republican ticket, and the applause which greeted Mr. Hadley was deafening for twenty minutes after he was introduced. It was entirely genuine, and it was not possible for the chairman of the meeting to control the house.


MADE A JOYFUL NOISE.

The scene which followed the introduction of Mr. Hadley was wild in the extreme, and for several minutes the speakers' stand in the center of the arena floor by the lowering of the big curtain, was in danger from the crowds pushing toward it from all sides. On the stage, stretching clear across the hall, the vice chairmen of the meeting joined in the demonstration. Beside the immense crowd the audiences of other rallies during the campaign appeared as mere reception committees of the real members of the party in Kansas City.

Disorder which the chairman could not abate took possession of the great crowd when United States Senator William Warner named the nominee for governor. Time after time Mr. Hadley advanced to the edge of the platform in an attempt to be heard, but his voice was drowned by the cheers of his admirers. The newspaper men were routed from their tables and an improvised platform of but a few square feet was arranged in the center of the stage. When Mr. Hadley mounted this stand it was but a signal for further demonstration.


ROUGHNECKS IN EVIDENCE.

It was not until Mr. Hadley had delivered several hundred words of his address that the first attempt to disturb the meeting broke out in the crowded west balcony. There was a second attempt and then a third; and the disturbers were hissed from every corner of the hall. Women in the section where the disturbance occurred were forced to leave their seats and places were provided for them in the boxes below. There was a general shout for the police, but the hissing of Mr. Hadley's admirers served to drive out the disturbers.

Mr. Hadley talked as a Kansas Cityan to his home folks. He made a plea for the entire state ticket and then asked his friends to support Fred Dickey and William Buchholz for the senate, and the nominees for representative in the interest of the candidacy of Colonel Kerens for the United States senate. Senator Warner had previously made a plea for support of Colonel Kerens and the candidate had had a chance to speak in his own behalf, but had modestly confined his remarks to other party issues and his confidence in the success of the ticket in Missouri.


A WORD FOR KIMBRELL.

Mr. Hadley also asked support for I. B. Kimbrell for county prosecutor and called attention to the four candidates for the circuit bench. He mentioned the Democratic attempts to discredit the party with circulars intended to create race prejudice. He read a letter from a Kansas City Democrat who is going to support him because members of his own party had made the mistake of showing him what he considered dirty plans to defeat a clean candidate.

After Mr. Hadley reached the hall several questions were asked him and these he answered from the platform. One request was for a statement if he would enforce the Sunday saloon closing law. It was signed by "several Democrats who wished to know before voting." Mr. Hadley answered that he intended, if elected, to make the Sunday saloon closing laws affecting Kansas City and St. Louis mean just exactly what they state upon the books. He said he did not desire the support of any special interest, nor did he want any special interest to make an unfair fight against him. He offered a square deal to the saloonist who obeys the law and respects the qualifications of his license.

As a closing word of his campaign, Mr. Hadley stated that he would decline to qualify in office if elected, should any taint be charged against his nomination. He said he was nominated by honest votes and wanted no tainted election. He asked that Jackson county and Kansas City give him the 4,000 majority he received four years ago when a candidate for attorney general.

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October 3, 1908

TAFT TO BE HERE TOMORROW.

Republican Presidential Candidate Will
Spend Sunday in City.

The train bearing William H. Taft from Topeka to Kansas City is expected to arrive tomorrow morning at 7 o'clock where a reception committee consisting of Senator William Warner, Congressman E. C. Ellis and W. S. Dickey will meet the presidential candidate and escort him to the Baltimore hotel.

In the morning Mr. Taft will attend the Beacon Hill Congregational church and will then lunch at the home of W. S. Dickey. In the afternoon he will go to the Independence Avenue M. E. church, where he will address the Y. M. C. A. at 3:30 o'clock. His subject will be "The Foreign Work of the Association."

Monday morning Mr. Taft will be taken over the intercity viaduct to Kansas City, Kas., where he will address the populace from the steps of the public library.

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September 27, 1907

WIPE OUT TUBERCULOSIS

OBJECTS OF A SOCIETY FORMED
LAST NIGHT.

Building and Endowing of a Tent
Colony and a Sanitarium
Among the Purposes
of Promoters.

Fresh Air, Fresh Milk and Fresh Eggs.

That's the motto of the Jackson County Society for the Relief and Prevention of Tuberculosis, organized last night. The leading men of the city -- doctors, ministers, priests, lawyers and officeholders -- attended the meeting and promised their assistance in putting the society in shape to do real work.

The programme of intentions outlined for the next few months is:

The building and endowing of a tent colony and a sanitarium near the city for the treatment of tuberculosis patients.

The employment of nurses to visit in the homes of consumptives and teach the people how to live properly when afflicted with the disease.

The enactment of laws by the city council to compel the reporting of all cases of tuberculosis, and to clean and disinfect all houses in which consumptives had lived or died.

The distribution of literature and the holding of public meetings to educate the people in healthy living -- fresh air, baths and wholesome food.

"Kansas City is twenty years behind Eastern cities in dealing with tuberculosis," said Dr. C. B. Irwin, one of the organizers of the society, last night. There is no fumigation, no reports of deaths from the disease, and practically no effort to check the spread of the plague. I know one house in this city from which there men have been carried out dead from consumption in the past five years. It's easy to know how the last two got it. As fast as one family moved out another moved in.

"Since in 1880 New York city began fumigating houses in which tuberculosis patient had died, began educating the people and commenced a systematic fight upon the disease, the death rate from it had fallen 50 per cent. The same is true of Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore.

"In the Western cities one death in every seven is from the white plague."

The directors of the society, chosen last night, are: Rev. Father W. J. Dalton, Dr. E. W. Schauffler, Judge H. L McCune, Mayor H. M. Beardsley, Frank P. Walsh, R. A. Long, Rev. Matt S. Hughes, Hugo Brecklein, Dr. St. Elmo Sauders, Congressman F. C. Ellis, Mrs. Robert Gillam, Ralph Swofford, Albert Bushnell, F. A. Faxon, George F. Damon and J. W. Frost.

The others are: Dr. R. O. Cross, president; Dr. C. B. Irwin, secretary, Albert Marty, treasurer; John T. Smith, Rev. Wallace M. Short, J. W. Frost and E. A. Krauthoff, vice presidents; chairman finance committee, Mrs. Kate E. Pierson; chairman soliciting committee, Mrs. E. T. Brigham; chairman legislative committee, J. V. C. Karnes, and publication committee, Dr. E. L. Stewart, chairman; Dr. E. L. Mathias and Clarance Dillon.

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May 15, 1907

AIR POLITICAL ROW

TAKING TESTIMONY IN MANN-
DANNHOWER CASE
THE JURY IS DEMOCRATIC.

STATE PROVES DANNAHOWER
HAD THE LETTERS PRINTED.
Long Brewing Row Among Tenth
Ward Republicans Finally
Reaches Criminal Court--
Prominent Men as Witnesses.

Prosecuting Attorney I. B. Kimbrell, in his opening argument to the jury in the case against William Dannahower, charged with criminal libel, upon the complaint of Homer B. Mann, formerly speaker of the lower house of the city council and treasurer of the Republican county central committee, yesterday afternoon said:

"The state will attempt to prove that the defendant with malicious intent had printeed and circulated hand bills in which the public character and private life of Homer B. Mann was held up to public ridicule and contempt. In these circulars, alleged to have been written by the defendant, Mr. Mann is charged with corruption in public office and immorality in private life. The state wil show that these circulars were sent to many of Mr. Mann's friends in Kansas City and in Washington, and were went to his wife and left in the school yard where his children attended school."

The case promises to last all of this week and to be hard fought. One hundred and thirteen witnesses have been subpoenaed, seventy-four of them by the defense. The state's wintesses, in addition to Homer Mann and his wife, include Congressman E. C. Ellis; Thomas K. Niedringhaus, chairmoan of the Republican state entral committee, and Joseph McCoy, of St. Louis. The fefense has subpoenaed among its list of seventy-four Bernard Corrigan, of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company; C. F. Morse, of the Kansas City Stock Yards Company; Al Heslip, county marshal; Frank C. Peck and Wallace Love.

ONE REPUBLICAN ON JURY.

From the questions asked of the men who tried to qualify as jurors, it can be guessed that teh state is relying upon a conviction along lines of direct evidence, adn that the defense hopes to muddle the case by airing the linen of the Tenth Ward Republican Club. The jurors impaneled were asked by Attorney L. H. Waters, for the defense, whether they were Democrats or Republicans in politics and whether or not they had ever held office or done work for the city or county. Prosecuting Attorney Kimbrell passed over the matter of political affiliations, and tended strictly to seeing that the jury was composed of married men with families. Evidently he intends to bring out stongly the fact that Dannahower is charged with forcing the attention of Mr. Mann's wife and children to the circulars which he is alleged to have written.

"The defense is trying to make Democratic political capital out of this trial," said Clyde Taylor, who is assisting Attorney Kimbrell in the prosecution, "but I don't see what they will gain by it. This is a criminal libel suit and not a political meeting. If they are not careful they will overplay their hand and neglect their client's interests."

The jury which is trying the case coprises: Charles R. Jones, Democrat; J. F. Shortridge, Independent; J. M. Burton, Democrat; I. H. B. Edmondson, Democrat; Albert L. Williams, Democrat; J. H. North, Independent; J. G. White, Democrat; Elmer Dorse, Democrat; W. E. Van Crate, Independent; J. H. Pemberton, Democrat; W. D. Oldham, Democrat, and F. B. Alexander, Republican.

Every juror is married and has children. most of them are business men and own their own homes. There is only one Republican in the twelve. Attorney Kimbrell and Attorney Waters got what they wanted in the character of the jurors and the twelve men were agreed upon after half an hour.

MANN HAD KNIFE, ELLIS SAYS.

The first witness for the state was Congressman E. C. Ellis. He testified that he had received at his residence in Washington, D. C., last February copies of the circulars signed by Dannahower through the registered mail. Upon cross-examination he admitted that he once was in a buggy with Mr. Mann when Dannahower drove by and the men began quarreling. He admitted that Mann had an open knife in his hand, but denied that Mann had tried to use the knife. He said that very hot words passed between the two men.

J. F. Ewing, of the Gate City Printing and Advertising Company, 1229 Main street, swore taht Mr. Dannahower had placed tow orders for printed circulars with the establishment, got the circulars and paid for them. One order was placed on October 27, 1906, for 10,000 circulars, and one in February, 1907, for 2,000. Dannahower paid the firm $30 for the big order and $6 for the second. The circulars were different. Copies of both were introduced in evidence, as was a copy of the Gate City company's ledger account with Dannahower.

R. F. Jarmon, of 3419 Summit, formerly of Jarmon & Kykes, at 1229 Main, testified that three years ago, during the Kemper-Neff campaign, he had printed several thousand circulars for Dannahower in which Mr. Mann was attacked. His testimony was stricken out on account of the time which had expired, but the court let stand his statement that at the time Dannahower gave the order he said he was "going to keep after Mann until he got him."

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April 30, 1907

THE PARDON FOR ANDERSON.

Senator Warner Will Take the Case
Up With the Department Today.

WASHINGTON, April 29. -- (Special.) Senator Warner will take up the Charles Anderson pardon matter with the president and attorney general Tuesday.

J. M. Kennedy, secretary to Representative Ellis, has classified the petitions and got them in shape so the attorney general can go through them rapidly. He will take them to the department of justice and will be accompanied by Senator Warner.

"I do not apprehend any trouble geting the pardon," said Senator Warner, "although it may not come for a few days."

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Special Report -- C. W. ANDERSON

HAYES WRITES TO ELLIS.

Adds His Recommendation for the
Pardon of Anderson.

Chief of Police John Hayes is one who believes that Charles Anderson has not had a square deal. he wrote the following letter to Congressman E. C. Ellis yesterday. It explains itself:

Hon. E. C. Ellis.
Dear Sir:--I have investigated the case of and talked with a great many people who are well acquainted with William January, alias Charles W. Anderson. They have known him for nine years and all say that they have known him as a good, law abiding citizen. As far as my investigation has gone this man has shown himself to be all the people say about him. He has led an honest and upright life since he has been in this city and considering the circumstances as they have arisen, and the upright manner in which he has conducted himself, I cannot to otherwise than recommend his pardon.

His wife and child deserve consideration in the case and they surely have the sympathy of nine-tenths of the good people of Kansas City. He made a mistake at one time in his life, but I am convinced that he has fully atoned for the error and should have the greatest consideration at the hands of a merciful people. Trusting that all efforts tending toward the speedy pardon of Charles W. Anderson may meet with success, I remain, truly and sincerely, JOHN HAYS, Chief of Police.

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Special Report -- C. W. ANDERSON

WHERE ANDERSON HAS BEEN..

Details His Life Since Escape
From Leavenworth Penitentiary.

LEAVENWORTH, KAS.--(Special.) Charles W. Anderson, late this afternoon, in the presence of Warden R. W. McClaughry, of the United States penitentiary, covered in detail his career from the time he escaped from prison in October, 1898, up to the time he was arrested in Kansas City a few days ago. This is the first statement Anderson has made covering his nine years of freedom and it was made for Congressman Ellis, of Kansas City, who wrote Warden McClaughry today that he would present Anderson's application for pardon to the president and he wished to get all the facts possible concerning the man.

In the first place Anderson said his right name is John W. January. He said he and Walter Axton, upon their escape from prison on the night of October 9, 1898, went to Atchison, where they parted next day. He went from there to Winfield, Kas., and secured work in a rock quarry. In a few days Axton showed up there and he also took a position in the quarry.

About two months later Axton was found dead, but it was never determined whether he committed suicide or died a natural death. Anderson continued to work in the quarry another month, when he took a position, going from house to house, selling tea and coffee. He continued at this work about a year, when he went to Kansas City.

Upon arrival in Kansas City he became an insurance solicitor, but did not work on that long, as he did not like the work. Then he began selling tea, coffee and spices on his own account. He followed this a while, when he became a street car conductor and remained in the service until he started in the restaurant business.

This he sold out a few weeks ago and was seeking another location when arrested.

Warden McClaughry is satisfied that Anderson covered his record exactly as it occurred and he believes the prisoner's statement will go a long way toward securing executive clemency for him. Warden McClaughry said tonight that Anderson's chances for getting a full pardon from the president were exceedingly bright.

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April 22, 1907

UNITE FOR PARDON.

BUSINESS MEN ACTIVE ON BEHALF
OF C. W. ANDERSON.
PETITIONS QUICKLY SIGNED.

MASS MEETING WILL BE HELD TONIGHT ON TWELFTH.
Persons Who Did Not Know Ander-
son Are Interested in the Move-
ment to Secure His Release--
Only the President Can
Free Kansas Cityan.

Today a thousand men, representing every walk of life in Kansas City, will begin working to secure a pardon for Charles W. Anderson, who escaped from the penitentiary at Leavenworth nine years ago with but eight months of five years sentence before him for robbing a post office in Oklahoma, and was arrested here Saturday and taken back to the prison.

A mass meeting of business men who knew Anderson will be held tonight at 702 East Twelfth street with a view of securing a pardon. Petitions were circulated yesterday and one of them had forty signers within an hour after it had been drawn. Last night seventy-five names were on the list.

This petition was drawn in behalf of Anderson to be presented in connection with a petition which will be sent to President Roosevelt. Other similar petitions, to be attached to an original paper which will be presented at the meeting tonight, have been scattered about the city and the signers ask no questions. Many of them know Anderson personally and describe him as a hale fellow well met, honest and trustworthy.


THREE PETITIONS OUT.
Congressman E. C. Ellis has been invited to attend the meeting tonight and it is expected that he will be there. When asked last night what he would do for the prisoner, he said:
I have not investigated the matter as much as I should like to, but will do so tomorrow and if he is as worthy as he is said to be I will present the petition for his pardon to President Roosevelt. If the reports of him are true I will be very glad to take the matter up."
The petitions started yesterday will be given active circulation today. One of them was placed in Brooks' restaurant, 210 East Twelfth street, another at Clifford's cigar store at Twelfth street and Grand avenue, and a third, which received more signatures than the rest, in Lorber's cigar store, 317 East Twelfth street.
Lorber, who has known him in a business way for several years, says that Anderson has been prompt in his payments and that he did not hesitate at any time to trust "Charlie" for $75 or $100. In fact, when Anderson wanted to buy his partner's interest in February, a year ago, Lorber advanced the necessary money to him on Anderson's mere statement he did not have enough money to make the purchase.
"Did he pay it back?" exclaimed Lorber, almost in astonishment that the question should be asked, "Well, I should say he did. And quickly, too. And more than that, all of his payments on bills of goods were made promptly. No one questioned the honestly of Anderson."
BUSINESS RECORD HERE.
All of his friends know him as Anderson. "Charlie," they call him, and in the familiarity of the name itself they express sentiment of men who, when they know a man, know him well.
Anderson first went into business for himself at 720 East Twelfth street, April 4, 1905, in partnership with a man named Lowry, purchasing the latter's interest in the restaurant over a year ago. After running the business alone for a year and two days, he sold out, and started to look for a better location. He was always cheerful, it is said, and everyone who refers to his home life speaks of his affection for his little girl, 3 years old, and his wife.
"Is it justice to take a man who is working industriously and trying hard to succeed, back to prison for a crime committed twelve years ago?" asked a friend of his last night on a street corner where the arrest of Anderson for a forgotten robbery was the chief subject of discussion.
A number of citizens called on Charles Riehl, assistant prosecuting attorney, last night to have him draw up the petition which will be presented to President Roosevelt. It is doubtful if Kansas City ever took as much interest in the release of a prisoner as has been shown in seeking the liberation of Anderson. Not only those who knew him but men who never heard his name before are actively working for his release.

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March 22, 1907

HIS SPEECH BETRAYED HIM.

Jury Gives Highwayman Six Years
-- Pal Pleads Guilty, Gets Five.

Mike Savage says he is an Irishman, but he doesn't make a noise like one. He was in the criminal court yesterday and was given a sentence by a jury of six years for highway robbery. It was charged that he, with the assistance of a man named Sam Hight, held up E. E. Ellis, a brother of the congressman, near Twenty-fifth and Troost on the evening of January 5 and got $3.50 from him.

A part of the testimony for the prosecution was to the effect that the man who held up Mr. Ellishad an unusual impediment in his speech. Mr. Ellis testified that the man who had the revolver exclaimed: "Det up you han's' det 'em up, det 'em up."

During the trial Savage was not permitted by his lawyer to go on the witness stand. Throughout the trial he was mute. But he gave himself away as he left the court room after the verdict was in.

"I dant a new drial," he exclaimed, shaking his fist at Judge Slover. "I dain't doing to be done dis way in dis court."

It was to laugh, and all of the court officials, even Judge Slover, laughed.

Savages wife had made a scene in the court room only an hour or so before and was forcibly put out by the deputies. Hight, Savage's accomplice, pleaded guilty and took a sentence of five years -- one year less than Savage got by standing trial.

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