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February 3, 1910

SUDS MAKERS ON CARPET.

Police Board Investigates Heim De-
liveries in East Bottoms.

The Heim Brewing Company was called on yesterday to explain the presence of twenty-five cases of its beer in the house of a Belgian in the East Bottoms near the Milwaukee bridge. This with a large quantity of whisky and wine was found there Sunday, January 23, by police from No. 8 station. They were disguised as railroad men and reported that they had no trouble in getting whatever they wanted, the Belgian's wife waiting on them as bar maid.

"It is not unusual," said a driver for the brewery who delivers in that district, "for five or six cases of beer to be left at one Belgian home on Saturday, especially where they keep boarders. One Belgian will easily consume a whole case over Sunday. All sales are cash and many times one person will buy several cases saying they are for different parties who left the money with him because he lived near the road."

An agent for the brewery explained that if the sales had been made in any other part of the city but the East Bottoms it would have caused suspicion and an investigation.

"But who would suspect a bootlegging joint down among the Belgians?" he said. "We never thought of such a thing and therefore the sales caused no remark."

"But the driver who sold the beer is still in your employ, I see," insisted Commissioner Thomas R. Marks. "Does that show good faith with this board?"

"We do not think the driver is to blame," said the agent. "It was an everyday occurrence. And how is the company to blame?"

"Well," said Mr. Marks, "we have no right to try the driver. This board now is holding up two of the Heim licenses on account of sales made to the Buffalo Club, a lid-lifting organization, and I think when it holds up about three more next July you will keep an eye on where your beer goes when delivered to other than saloons."

Judge R. B. Middlebrook made no remark other than to say that the case would be taken under advisement and decided later.

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November 15, 1909

WOOLF TOOK NO CHANCES.

Didn't Even Take Cigars Until
Board Gave Permission.


A box of cigars was handed to the board of police commissioners yesterday with a written request from Patrolman J. L. Woolf that he be permitted to accept it. Counselor Cromer explained that he had recently sent Woolf out to stand guard at a wedding.


"When he left," said Cromer, "the host handed Woolf a cigar. He noticed that a bill was folded beneath the band. Woolf refused the cigar. The man asked Woolf to call at his place and gave him this box of cigars, which he is asking permission to accept."

"Good," shouted Commissioner marks, "I wish there were more men on the force like this one. Let him have the cigars. That's what all the men should do when they receive a present -- but they don't."

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September 23, 1909

NEVER AGAIN, SAYS MARKS.

Women With Babies Will Not Be
Put in the Holdover.

The matron's room at police headquarters has been refitted with new furniture, new beds and clothing. Commissioner Marks said last night that a repetition of Monday night's condition when two women with babies in their arms were confined in the holdover would not likely occur again.

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September 20, 1909

MARKS ASKS MATRON'S
RESIGNATION; GETS IT.

Commissioner Says Mrs. Burns Dis-
obeyed Orders in Various Ways.
She's Off the Force.

Mrs. Elizabeth Burns, for nearly two years a police matron, resigned yesterday upon the request of Thomas R. Marks, police commissioner. Mrs. Burns left police headquarters soon after and went to her home, 1509 Harrison street.

Mrs. Burns said she was accused by Mr. Marks of having allowed a reporter for The Journal to talk with Ethelyn Collins, held by the police as a material witness. The Journal printed no interview with the Collins girl. It was said that strict orders had been given that no one except police officers should talk with the Collins girl.

"I left the matron's room but a minute Saturday night," Mrs. Burns said. Mrs. Maud Fontella, where the Collins girl lived, brought the girl $31. As prisoners are not allowed to have money at police headquarters, I asked Henry C. Smith, a special investigator for the police board, who brought Mrs. Fontella to the matron's room, to wait in the room until I got back.

"When I returned three minutes later a reporter for The Journal was talking to Smith. So far as I know he did not talk to the girl nor make any effort to. I told him he could not talk to her and he laughed and said he 'had the whole story.'

"When Mr. Marks asked for my resignation, I was so stunned that I complied without thinking that he was not the entire board. I would not work at headquarters again, but I would like to be tried by the police board in order that my record may be cleared, as I am guiltless of any charge made."

Mrs. Burns is the widow of William Burns, for many years a member of the police force and a captain at the time of his death. She has four children.

Commissioner Marks denied last night that he had taken into consideration the fact that a Journal reporter had talked to the girl, in the presence of Henry Smith, a patrolman, when he asked Mrs. Burns for her resignation. He said that as far as he was concerned the fact that she had allowed a visitor to see Tony Cruie against expressed orders was not used against her.

She had allowed two men, one an old man and the other a young one, to speak with the girl against orders, he said, and had disobeyed orders in other ways, he intimated.

Soon after taking oath as a commissioner Mr. Marks informed reports that there would soon be two good-hearted matrons at police headquarters. It was rumored last night in police circles that Mrs. Joanna Moran was to be asked for her resignation also. Mrs. Burns and Capt. Walter Whitsett have had little difficulties several times.

Soon after Mrs. Burns left the station yesterday, Mrs. J. K. Ellwood, formerly matron of the detention home, was sent for by Mr. Marks. Her husband is the secretary to Inspector E. P. Boyle. She was placed in charge of the matron's room and spent the night at the station.

She said that Mr. Marks had asked her for forty-eight hours of her time, and then she was to be through. Asked if she expected to receive the appointment as a permanent position she refused to answer.

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September 20, 1909

CAPTAIN BRANHAM
QUITS OCTOBER 1?

VETERAN POLICE OFFICER ON
THE FORCE 35 YEARS.

Too Old to Drill, He Told Friends.
Resignation Said to Follow
Interchange with Mem-
ber of the Board.
Captain J. S. Branham of the No. 3 Police Station.
CAPTAIN J. S. BRANHAM, 35 YEARS A POLICEMAN.

Following a recent exchange of letters between himself and Police Commissioner Thomas R. Marks relative to police matters in the No. 3 district, the resignation of Captain John S. Branham, for thirty-five years on the police force, and its oldest member in point of service, it is said, was received at police headquarters yesterday, effective on October 1. The captain before had told friends that he was too old to drill, and intended leaving the force.

Several weeks ago the police raided the Cordova hotel and arrested several men who were charged with selling beer on Sunday. The liquor was sold only to guests of the hotel. As the raid was made by special officers from headquarters the police of No. 3 district did not get credit for it. Commissioner Marks at a board meeting complained because Captain Branham had not stopped the sale months before. An official letter, dictated by Mr. Marks, was sent to the captain, calling for an explanation.

Captain Branham replied by saying that an officer in uniform could not make the arrest, as the hotel people only sold to its guests and there had never been a flagrant violation of the law.

OLDEST IN POINT OF SERVICE.

The reply was not satisfactory to Commissioner Marks, who said that Captain Branham was like many other old officers incapacitated for duty. The captain is 63. The captain chafed under the inference of the commissioner which were repeated to him. Then on Friday night Commissioner Marks informed all of the officers that they must drill.

"If you do not like the regulations laid down by this board or the instructions given by the commissioners you can quit," Commissioner Marks told the assembled officers.

Captain Branham's resignation yesterday is believed to be the outcome of the drill instructions and the Cordova matter.

In point of service Captain Branham holds the record. He was appointed to the force in May, 1874, and has been in continuous service since. He was long stationed at headquarters, but of late years he has been in command of the No. 3 station. He was born in Columbia, Boone county, Missouri, February 15, 1846. In 1871 he was deputy sheriff of Sedgwick county, Kansas, and in 1873 filled a similar position at Ellsworth, Kas.

WOULDN'T NAME THE CAPTAIN.

Some time ago Captain Branham was granted a thirty days' leave of absence by the board. At that time Commissioner Marks said, after the station was put under the command of Lieutenant George Sherer, that the captain was on vacation which might be made permanent. Mr. Marks last night refused to say that Captain Branham had resigned.

In speaking of the new uniforms and the manner the clubs were carried in the belt Mr. Marks remarked that if any patrolman was not satisfied with the new regulations he could quit. He said the officers were told the same thing, and that one had taken advantage of the advice. Asked which one he refused to give out the name, saying it would be made public later.

He said that there were no charges of any kind against the captain who had resigned, and that he had not been asked for his resignation.

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September 17, 1909

DRILL BY ROOKIES OPENS
POLICE NIGHT SCHOOL.

First Lecture on Etiquette and Mili-
tary Tactics Given to Cap-
tains and Sergeants.

In the office of the police commissioners last night about thirty sergeants, captains and lieutenants of police heard the first of a series of lectures on military tactics, etiquette and duties of a police officer.

After listening to speeches by Commissioner Marks, Sergeant Charles Edwards and Sergeant Robert James, a squad of "rookies" were brought in to the room and gave an exhibition drill. With shoulders squared back, uniforms that fairly glistened with their newness and white gloves that matched the spotless collars, the new men created a favorable impression, some of whom could not have carried out a single order as given by Sergeant Lang.

"What do you think of that?" was Commissioner Marks's satisfied remark as he smiled.

"Now you men have got to know all about these orders and drill regulations or how we can expect the men to know anything about them?" he added, addressing the sergeants and captains.

"We expect the officers in charge to know how to lead a squad of men the same as these new men know how to obey them."

The new night school will be open every night for about two weeks. The officers on the opposite shift who work nights will be lectured this afternoon. Commissioner Marks said that later each man would be required to take turn in giving orders and that drilling would be one of the main features. It is thought that many of the officers will weigh considerably less at the expiration of two weeks. Reporters were not admitted to the lecture last night.

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September 16, 1909

POLICE FORBIDDEN
TO TAKE PRESENTS.

TWO DETECTIVES SUSPENDED
FOR THIS REASON.

Board Rules in Case Where Woman
Gave $25 to Show Appreciation,
That a Postage Stamp
Is Graft.

The police board ruled at its meeting yesterday afternoon that it would consider any officer as grafting who accepted "even a postage stamp or a cigar as a present."

The ruling was made after Detectives J. F. Lyngar and Charles T. Lewis had been suspended for sixty days for accepting a present of $25 from Mrs. Rose Herman, 909 Lydia avenue. The money was given to Lewis on September 1 for recovery of a $125 locket. He gave his partner, Lyngar, half of it. The board ordered that if the $25 was not returned to Mrs. Herman within twenty-four hours the officers would be dropped.

Mrs. Herman was an unwilling witness and when she took the stand she said, with her eyes suffused with tears: "I would like to make a preliminary statement. I am not making these charges against these officers. A friend of mine virtually trapped me into doing it. If in telling the truth here I am going to cause trouble for either of them I want to say now that I am very, very sorry for it."

GAVE HIS PARTNER HALF.

The witness then went on to tell how previously she had lost $30 and how Detective Lewis had succeeded in recovering it for her. When the locket was stolen she sent for him. On August 30 it was located in a pawnshop at 812 Independence avenue, where sh paid the pawnbroker $10 to get it back.

"Both officers were there," she continued, "and advised me that I could replevin the locket, but lawyer's fees would have been more than $10, so I paid it. The man wanted $18.

"It was then I told Mr. Lewis to come to my house the next day. When he did I voluntarily gave him $25. I meant it as a present, as I felt very grateful to get my locket back. And I still want the men to have the money. I was dragged into this thing unwillingly."

Detective Lewis admitted all that Mrs. Herman said and added that he had worked on both cases alone, simply giving his partner half of the $25.

"It was my idea," he said, "that we were not allowed to accept of a published reward without permission of this board. I did not know it was a violation of the statute to accept a present. I have done it before, and so has every man on the force for that matter. Mrs. Herman will tell you that I told her she owed me nothing, but still she insisted and I took it."

POSTAGE STAMP IS GRAFT.

Commissioners Marks and Middlebrook discussed the case in low tones for a long time before rendering a verdict. Then Judge Middlebrook wheeled swiftly about in his chair and said:

"Were it not for the fact that Mrs. Herman was an unwilling witness, that the money appears to have been thrust upon the officer, both men would be dropped from the department here and now. That is the only mitigating circumstance in this case. You are suspended for sixty days and the money must be paid to the secretary tomorrow. He will return it. Hereafter men found accepting presents will be absolutely dismissed from the force.

"The mere fact that you see no wrong in what you have done is to say the least distressing. You are paid $115 a month and the acceptance of a postage stamp above that is regarded as graft."

"Rear in mind now," added Mr. Marks, "this means that you are to accept nothing form the public, not even a cigar, without the permission of this board."

"If that rule is enforced," said an officer who heard the order, "the board would be kept busy examining new men for the force, as every ma on the department would lose his job every day. I know a copper who has lost his eleven times today, as he has just that many good cigars in his inside pocket."

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September 15, 1909

AX FOR MANY POLICEMEN.

Commissioner Marks Says There
Will Be Sweeping Changes.

According to Thomas R. Marks, police commissioner, there will be another sweeping change in the ranks of the department within the next few days. Of the seventy-five or more men who were examined three weeks ago, and whose commissions expired at that time, only a few showed the proper qualifications to be recommissioned, according to Mr. Marks. Men who cannot read or write have no place on the force, he said.

Many of the older men are not surprised by the announcement and some say they are getting ready to resign.

"I'm going to quit before they get me," one man said yesterday.

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August 13, 1909

NEW POLICE BOARD
SECRETARY NAMED.

BRYON E. LINE SUCCEEDS "JIM-
MIE" VINCIL SEPTEMBER 1.

Soldiered With Commissioner Marks
During Spanish-American War.
Retiring Secretary Held
Office Twelve Years.

Byron E. Line, formerly chief clerk and assistant purchasing agent of the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City railroad, has been appointed to succeed James E. Vincil, for twelve years secretary to the board of police commissioners, who presented his resignation to the board yesterday afternoon, effective September 1. Mr. Vincil went into the office under Commissioners Gregory and Scarritt in 1897.

The new secretary is 30 years old. He has lived in Kansas City eight years. His salary will be $2,100 a year. His address is 1001 Penn street, Aberdeen Flats.

During the Spanish-American war Mr. Line was sergeant-major of the Fifth Illinois infantry, and for a time his regiment was brigaded with the 160th Indiana infantry, in which Commissioner Thomas R. Marks was captain. It was there that Line and Marks became acquainted.

Probably today the board will name a clerk to assist the secretary. He will bear the title of "excise clerk," and will have the saloons to look after. He will be expected to prepare a history of each saloon in Kansas City since the law limiting them went into effect.

"He will be expected to look after the sanitary conditions of each saloon," said Mr. Marks, "and also the moral tone, as it were. He must keep a record of all saloon proprietors, bartenders, porters and other employes, with their residences, and a complete history of each man. The day when well-dressed vagrants, 'con' men, highwaymen and burglars may tend bar in Kansas City will become a thing of the past very soon."

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July 27, 1909

SEPARATE CHUTE FOR WOMEN.

Central Station Holdover to Be Re-
modeled Along Modern Lines.

If the plans of Walter C. Root, a member of the tenement commission, are carried out, the holdover and "chute" will not be so uninhabitable in the future. Accompanied by Commissioner Thomas R. Marks, Mr. Root visited the holdover yesterday. He will superintend its remodeling.

The plans call for a separate chute for female prisoners while police court is in session and they are awaiting trial.

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June 21, 1909

MARKS CALLED A BLUFF.

Invaded an Italian Saloon Where
He Had Been Threatened.

A few nights ago a carpenter, a citizen of Armourdale, Kas., strayed into an Italian saloon in West Fifth street. While there, he said he overheard the bartender and others talking of Commissioner Thomas R. Marks. Dire threats, even to cutting the commissioner's throat, or decapitating him, he claims, were made.

Believing he would do a service in warning the police of what he he heard, the carpenter went to police headquarters and told his story. While he was telling it, Mr. Marks came in and was called to hear what was said to be in store for him.

Suddenly Mr. Marks left the station. He knew the location of the saloon where the threats were said to have been made, and he went there.

"My name is Thomas R. Marks, one of the police commissioners of Kansas City," witnesses report him as saying. "I hear that someone over here is going to cut my throat or cut my head off before I reach the city hall tomorrow. Here I am and you may as well begin now."

Mr. Marks was so mad that for once he is reported to have used adjectives not in the dictionary.

"Notta me," said the man behind the bar. "Me say notta da word bout you, Mr. Commisinia de Marka. You doa one granda work. Me tink you one granda da man, good as Garibaldi or Georga de Wash. You come one wrong place; we all for Mr. Commisha de Marka."

About this time a customer arrived in the saloon, and, not knowing was was on, ordered a glass of beer. The man behind the bar, still lauding Mr. Marks, turned to draw the beer.

"Don't you turn your back on me, you stiletto-sticking, black-handed rascal," ordered the police commissioner.

The frightened Italian wheeled about with more profuse apologies, saying Mr. Marks was a greater man than "Mayor de Crit or Presidenta da Taffa."

After satisfying himself that all within his hearing had been thoroughly subdued and that no more threats would come from such a source, Mr. Marks strode from the trembling bunch of dark-eyed foreigners and went back to police headquarters. His venture was regarded as foolhardy by the police, none of whom he asked to accompany him. The police say, however, that the proprietor of that saloon now cannot have too much praise for "Mr. Commisha de Marka."

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June 17, 1909

ATTEMPTS MURDER TO
CONCEAL RECORD OF
POLICE PROBE.

THUG STRIKES DOWN MISS A. LEE
OWEN IN HER OFFICE IN
DWIGHT BUILDING.

WON'T STOP
INVESTIGATION.

MAYOR OFFERS A REWARD.

Young Woman Was Alone in Her
Office When Murderous Assailant
Tried to Crush Her Skull With a
Black Jack -- Commissioner Marks
Orders Men Who May Be Attacked
to Shoot to Kill -- Governor Had-
ley May Offer Reward Today.
Girl Struck Down by Unknown Assailants.
UNKNOWN THUG STRIKES DOWN POLICE BOARD'S GIRL STENOGRAPHER; STEALS RECORD OF INVESTIGATION.

Struck on the left temple with a "black jack" by an unknown thug, Miss Anna Lee Owen, a public stenographer who has been taking the evidence in the investigation held by the police commissioners, was knocked unconscious while at work in her office, 605 Dwight building, last night and a part of her stenographic notes stolen. She was taken to the University hospital immediately after being found by Hugh E. Martin. She is said to be in critical condition. Her skull probably is fractured.

Mayor Crittenden personally offers a reward of $100 for the arrest of her assailant.

The attack upon Miss Owen was made some time between 6:30 and 7:15 o'clock, while she was alone in her office. She regained consciousness before being removed to the hospital, but was not able to furnish a description of her assailant.


STRUCK FROM BEHIND.

Miss Owen's office is separated from the hall by a reception room. When Mr. Martin left the office at 6:30, she was at work on the notes. The hall door was closed and also the door leading from the reception room into her office. Mr. Martin returned to his office at 7:15. Opening the door into Miss Owen's office, he found her huddled on the floor. Believing she had fainted from overwork, he lifted her head and was startled by her groaning as if injured.

Liquor which was kept in another office in the suite was secured by Martin and he rubbed the young woman's head with it. She partially revived and exclaimed, "Mother, they have taken my notes." Dr. Eugene Carbaugh was summoned to attend Miss Owen, and Commissioner Thomas R. Marks was notified. He informed the police and then took personal charge of the case.

Cowardly Assault by a Brutal Thug With a Black Jack.
A BLACK JACK, SUCH AS WAS PROBABLY USED IN THE COWARDLY ASSAULT ON MISS OWEN.

Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle carried Miss Owen down stairs in the elevator and placing her in an automobile assisted Dr. Carbaugh in supporting her during the drive to the hospital.

From what little Miss Owen could tell last night she was working over her typewriter when she heard a step behind her chair. Knowing that the men who had offices in the suite had gone home, she looked up to see who it was. She had not heard the outer doors opened. Just as she secured a glance of the figure of a man, she was struck down.

IMPORTANT EVIDENCE GONE.

The stenographic notes and transcripts which she had made during the trials and investigations before the police commissioners were always carefully guarded by Miss Owen, who was afraid an attempt would be made to steal them. The notes were securely locked up in the office vault each night. When an investigation was made after she regained consciousness it was found that a large part of her notes were missing.

Just what notes were secured is not known. It was said that the evidence given late yesterday afternoon in the trial of the case against the conduct of the saloon conducted by James Redmond, 1205 Walnut street, were not secured. But it is believed that a large part of the testimony in the other investigations was lost.

ENTIRE FORCE AT WORK.

Through the inability of Miss Owen to assist the police by furnishing a description of her assailant, and also the failure of the police to elicit any information from the elevator operators was impossible to secure a clue to work on. No one could be found last night who had seen or noticed any stranger loitering in the halls or around the office in the Dwight building.

When Commissioner Marks arrived he ordered that the police make every possible effort to capture the thug, and until midnight he was actively engaged in directing the police in their work. The police were not notified of the assault until 8 o'clock, and inspector Boyle dispatched e very officer in the headquarters at the time to the scene. He and Captain Whitsett followed and were closeted with the commissioner for some time. Every detective in the city was called in and placed at work upon the case. The the substations were notified, and in all over 150 police officers were engaged in searching the city.

GIRL AND MARKS SHADOWED.

After the assault last night Commissioner Marks informed the police that he had been followed and shadowed by two men since he began his activity in the police shakeup. Not only has Mr. Marks been trailed, but Miss Owen has been dogged by two men to and from her work in the city. She was not positive of this surveillance, according to Mr. Marks, until Tuesday evening after the adjournment of the police board.

Intuitively feeling that she was being followed, Miss Owen boarded a Twelfth street car and transferred to a Northeast car. Arriving at Budd park she left the car and entered the park. All of this time the suspected man was in close proximity. At the park he disappeared for a time but was on hand when she again got on a car to ride into the city. She went to the Dwight building after leaving the car and while on the sixth floor saw the man in the hall. She then went to the office of Mr. Marks and informed him of what she had done.

GIRL FREQUENTLY ANNOYED.

Telling her to hold a handkerchief to her mouth if she saw the man on the street, Mr. Marks went down and walked around. He found a man on the street who appeared to fit the description of the man who had bothered Miss Owen, but she denied he was the one. The police were not notified at any time previous to the assault that either Miss Owen or the commissioner were being shadowed.

On another occasion it is said Miss Owen was frightened by men who followed her about the streets and went to the Coates house for the night, instead of returning to her home. While there, it was said, she received a telephone message from some man who refused to give his name. The purport of the telephone message was that there was a man in an adjoining room who intended her harm.

The mother of Miss Owen, who visited her daughter at the University hospital last night in answer to questions, said that her daughter had never mentioned to anyone at home that she was annoyed by anyone or that she had ever been followed.

On orders received from Mr. Marks, the hospital authorities refused to allow anyone to see Miss Owen. Strict orders were issued to not allow anyone but the nurse, her physicians and mother to visit the young woman. A special nurse was secured for her and the police commissioner's orders included a special diet for Miss Owen.

Several hours after the assault Dr. A. H. Cordler was called in consultation and the patient was pronounced to be in a very critical condition.

BY AN IMPORTED THUG.

The Dwight building was thoroughly searched by the police. Every street car in the city, and especially those leading into the suburbs, was being ridden by a police officer all night long. The outgoing trains were watched, although the police believed that the man would endeavor to leave the city by street car.

Inspector Boyle said last night that it was his opinion that the attack upon Miss Owen, and the theft of the stenographic notes, was done by an imported thug. If it was accomplished by home talent the inspector expressed the opinion that it was done on the spur of the moment to cover, if possible, damaging testimony given during the recent investigation. If the thug was imported for the purpose, St. Louis is probably the city, Inspector Boyle said, and his belief is also that of Captain Whitsett and Chief of Police Frank Snow.

Two men who have already figured in the police investigation and the saloon trials were ordered arrested and locked up of investigation. The theory of the police is that while these two men did not do the work they could give valuable information as to who did. But the men had not been found at 1 o'clock this morning. Captain Whitsett said he believed that the man would be arrested before twenty-four hours had passed. Acting Chief Snow said the man would be in custody by morning and inspector Boyle was positive he could not escape arrest.

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June 17, 1909

APOLOGIZES FOR POLICEMAN.

Special Officer Flourished Gun and
Marks Placates Man Whose Feel-
ing Had Been Outraged.

Charging that one of Bryant Cromer's special policemen stopped him near the Dwight building last night and thrust a revolver in his face, ordering him to hold up his hands, C. Owens of the Baltimore hotel demanded an apology from Police Commissioner Thomas R. Marks, last night. It was forthcoming.

According to Mr. Owens, he was walking slowly down Baltimore avenue in front of the Dwight building when a man stepped from the shadow and held a revolver in his face. Mr. Owens said that the man, whom he afterwards recognized, ordered him to halt and throw up his hands. "It's an outrage, Mr. Marks, and I demand an apology," he said. "That man had no right to draw a gun on me. He had been doing it all night. I have witnesses to prove what I say. I demand an apology."

Mr. Marks tried to explain the matter in a satisfactory way, shielding the special policeman, but finally was forced to apologize in order to save further trouble.

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April 9, 1909

WORKHOUSE DOORS OPEN
FOR "LIVE EASY" VAGRANTS.

Those Caught in Round-Up in Cap-
tain Flahive's District Fined
From $15 to $100.

In the municipal court yesterday morning, the twenty-five well-dressed vagrants who had been arrested in Captain Flahive's district the night previously, did not fare very well at the hands of Justice Festus O. Miller, who was on the bench. Twenty were fined in sums ranging from $15 to $100, and the majority were sent to the workhouse in the absence of friends who were willing to pay their fines or sign appeal bonds.

The court room was crowded with spectators who had come to the city hall to get a glimpse of men who could live without working. Every one smiled when they were brought before the judge in bunches by Sergeant H. L. Goode and Patrolmen George Brooks and Michael Gleason. The officers have been in the district for many years and their evidence was conclusive in most of the cases. Five of the twenty-five appeared to be under age, but were fair "understudies" of their companions, and were released with an admonition not to be caught in No. 4 district again.

Thomas R. Marks, one of the new commissioners, drifted into the municipal court session. He sat in the front row behind several policemen who were in court to prosecute the well-dressed vagrants.

"I am just looking around," was Marks's explanation of his presence.

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April 8, 1909

NEW POLICE BOARD
TO CLEAN UP TOWN.

MAKES FRANK SNOW ACTING
CHIEF, ED BOYLE INSPECTOR.

Flahive Given Pick of Force and
Told to Drive Out District 4's
Tough Gang and Ignore
the Politicians.
The New Police Board.
THE POLICE BOARD AS IT IS NOW COMPOSED.
T. R. MARKS, MAYOR CRITTENDEN, R. B. MIDDLEBROOK.

Captain Frank F. Snow, property clerk at police headquarters, was appointed acting chief of police, and Edward P. Boyle, a detective, was appointed acting inspector of detectives yesterday by the new board of police commissioners.

Captain Thomas P. Flahive of district No. 4 was given his pick of the force, and told to drive out the gang of crooks and undesirables in his district, despite the interference of any politician. Democrat or Republican, and clean up a certain disreputable element that has infested that part of the city for so long a time.

Chief Daniel Ahern was placed in charge of the new district, No. 10, and Inspector Charles Ryan was told that he would be taken care of.

Thomas R. Marks and R. B. Middlebrook, the first Republican police commissioners Kansas City has ever had, being in the majority on the board did not wait for the presence of Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., to start the ball rolling. By appointment they met in the office of Daniel Ahern, chief of police, shortly after noon. Then they sent for Charles Ryan, inspector of detectives.

RYAN IN THE RANKS.

Telling the two officials that they would be cared for in some manner, the commissioners asked for their resignations. In a few minutes, they had them in writing.

Captain Snow and Ed. P. Boyle were sent for and told that Snow was to be made acting chief of police and Boyle acting inspector of detectives.

Later, when the board met with the mayor in the chair, Commissioner Middlebrook presented Ahern's resignation and moved its acceptance. Snow was then formally made acting chief. The same form was gone through in regard to the acceptance of Ryan's resignation and the temporary appointment of Detective Boyle to his place.

The next order of business was to take care of the deposed officers. Ahern was appointed captain of the new police district, to be known as No. 10. Ryan was made a detective, and assigned to duty under Acting Inspector Boyle, his former subordinate.

AHERN IS APPRECIATIVE.

Captain Ahern showed great appreciation when the board cared for him in the manner in which it did.

"I did not expect to remain," said the former chief. "My position belonged to the new commissioners, and they had a right to it. I certainly appreciate the magnificent manner in which I have been cared for, and will show it by doing my full duty and carrying out to the letter every order of the board."

Former Inspector Ryan had little to say except that he would line up with the men he used to boss with such severity, and do the best he could. It was intimated that Ryan may resign from the force later, but that could not be confirmed.

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April 4, 1909

MAY GET WHITSETT'S JOB.

Rumored Captain Casey Will Go to
Headquarters Station.

It was common talk among the politicians at the city hall yesterday that in case the new board of police commissioners made a general shift of all officers now in command of their different outside stations Captain John J. Casey, who is now at No. 6 station, would be shifted to headquarters in the place of Captain Walter Whitsett. A few days ago Thomas A. Marks is reported to have said that there would be a general change as soon as the new board took control.

Captain Casey is considered the most likely candidate for the important place at headquarters, owing to the fact that his brother, Senator Michael Casey, was active in lining up the Democratic senate in favor of the confirmation of Marks and Middlebrook. Casey is considered to be one of the most efficient officers in the department.

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February 27, 1909

POLICE BOARD IS
NAMED BY HADLEY.

R. B. MIDDLEBROOK AND THOS.
R. MARKS APPOINTED.

Mr. Middlebrook Is to Serve Until
the Time When He Can Be Ap-
pointed to Board of Elec-
tion Commissioners.

R. B. Middlebrook and Thomas R. Marks were yesterday appointed by Governor Herbert S. Hadley members of the police board. In making the announcement, the governor gave out the following statement:

"I have offered the positions of police commissioners of Kansas City to R. B. Middlebrook and Thomas R. Marks and they have somewhat reluctantly consented to serve. Neither was an applicant for the position. I have given almost as much time to the selection of police commissioners in Kansas City as to all of my other appointments.

"The question has not been the selecting of two commissioners, but the selection of a commissioner that would meet the requirements of the situation. In my effort to secure such a commissioner I have offered the appointments to R. C. Meservey, D. J. Haff, Henry M. Beardsley, Eugene H. Blake, Clyde Taylor, Thomas H. Reynolds and John H. Thatcher. None of these gentlemen felt that they ought or could accept the position.

"I feel that in Mr. Middlebrook and Mr. Marks, I have finally secured two men who are familiar with the conditions existing in the police department in Kansas City, and know how a good police department ought to be conducted. I feel confident that they will meet my expectations and the requirements of the situation."

Mr. Middlebrook is to serve as police commissioner only until there is a vacancy on the board of election commissioners, when he will be appointed to fill it.

Both of Governor Hadley's appointees to the Kansas City board of police commissioners were of the opinion yesterday that the announcement of any particular brand of reform would be presumptuous as well as premature. Neither was inclined to go into generalities concerning the duties of the members of the board, but even with the short notice on which their appointments were made, each had a number of ideas that promise much in the way of curbing criminal activities.

"I have no swamp-root remedies or sweeping reforms to proclaim," said Thomas R. Marks last night at his office in the First National bank building. "I have a well-imbedded idea that the police service should become one of the military arms of the state, with its efficiency raised to the highest possible degree by the enforcement of discipline and promotion for the men, based on merit alone. It should be the alm of the police department to win the confidence of respectable citizens and not submit to the machinations of a lot of political gangsters.

"It appears to me that the published reports of an epidemic of crime are not exaggerated. Of course, you can't put down crime with a theory, and I hope I'm not a crank on such matters, but it seems to me that the problem can be boiled down to this: Law enforcement."

"Will a chief of police be appointed from within or with the force?" Mr. Marks was asked.

"Personally, I would much prefer that a head of the department be selected from those attached to it, provided a man who can meet the qualifications can be found. On the other hand I should not hesitate to go outside of the force for a chief, if I thought it were for the benefit of the service. This same applies to other appointments to be made by the board./

"Governor Hadley called me up this afternoon and told me I simply must accept the appointment," said Robert R. Middlebrook last night at his residence, 1800 Linwood boulevard. "It could not but militate against good taste for me to make any statement as to reform," Mr. Middlebrook went on. "The trouble with most so-called reformers," he said, "is that they do not preserve the rotundity of the law as they would have it enforced. They vigorously enforce the statutes against certain classes of criminals, while other classes, not so conspicuous perhaps, go unchecked. That is lop-sided reform. I am for a clean, orderly administration, with the explicit understanding that the compensation fixed by law shall be the only remuneration. In other words -- no graft."

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August 5, 1908

COWHERD CHOICE
OF DEMOCRATS.

KANSAS CITY MAN WINS OVER
NUMEROUS OPPONENTS.

WALLACE WAS WEAK
AT HOME.

CHANCES ARE THAT KANSAS
CITY'S NEW CHARTER WINS.

Much Dissatisfaction Is Expressed by
Candidates and Others Over the
New Primary Law.
Returns Slow.

At 3:30 o'clock this morning only thirty six precincts out of the 164 in Kansas City had been canvassed by the election commissioners, and in the county outside the city but four of the forty precincts had been heard from. In the city there were thirty precincts that had not reported to the election commissioners at the hour indicated, and the outlook was that the counting would not be finished much before noon today.
Shortly after midnight the three commisssioners saw the hopelessness of the task before them, and gave up counting the returns and turned the work over to deputies. Under the law the commissioners were not reuired to canvass the vote before Friday, but as an accommodation to the public and candidates informally called out the returns as they came in. It was slow work.
The returns were slow in coming in, and it was 9 o'clock before the first box was received at the commissioners' offices. This was from the First precinct of the First ward, and after that the returns came in spasmodically and it was 10:20 o'clock before enough precincts were heard from to encourage the commissioners in beginning the canvass.

BOSSES STILL CONTROL.

Framed to eliminate bosses and leaders, and to install in their places in politics the people, the experience of the new primary law in Missouri, tried for the first time yesterday, showed how completely the bosses can manipulate affairs to suit their own ends. There being no important contests within the Republican ranks, and few of any sort whatever, the new law was not tried out by that party. In the Democratic ranks, however, there was fighting all down the line, and the partial and unofficial results which had arrived up to 1 o'clock this morning fail to show an instance where a free lance made even a respectable showing.
In Kansas City and in St. Louis the rival bosses worked in close order and carried everything before them. Here Reed and Shannon, hereditary enemies, were hand in glove, and in St. Louis Jim Butler and Harry Hawes, for years at each other's throats, had identical interests.
The count last night in this city was charged by the friends of Judge William H. Wallace as outrageous. Some of the old hands in the booths, instead of undertaking to deny this, were rather proud of the returns they took with the to the election commissioners' office, all of them showing Judge Wallace heartlessly snowed under.
The Ninth ward, "Shannonville," for fifteen years opposed to Cowherd, went overwhelmingly for him yesterday. Starting with the First precinct of the First ward, Cowherd got every vote there but one, and that one went to Stapel. Wallace was not mentioned. The same condition of affairs seemed to prevail generally throughout the city, so that it is expected the final count will show Cowherd to have swept Jackson county to the tune of 12,000 to 15,000.

WHEN WALLACE WENT HOME.

As late as Monday night Judge Wallace told his court stenographer, Clarence Wofford, that he would beat Cowherd here and added that he undoubtedly would carry St Louis city. By 9 o'clock it was known in Kansas city that twenty out of 435 precincts in St. Louis had given Cowherd 1,835, Wallace 12, which report sent Judge Wallace back to his residence on Scarritt's point, for he had gone down town to receive the returns at the commissioners office.

DID NOT LIKE THE DIRECT PRIMARY.

While many candidates have declined to go on record with their personal sentiments regarding the direct primaries, most of them are frankly saying they have heard many complaints from other candidates. Thomas R. Marks, chairman of he Republican county central committee, is satisfied the law isn't going to be accepted as successful. He admits that in its first test it hasn't been given a representative vote in Kansas City and Jackson county.
"It isn't fair," said Mr. Marks at Republican headquarters last night, "for a Republican to step into a polling place and openly call for a Democratic ballot. This was done to an extent astonishing today. It isn't fair, in this instance, to the Democrats that the Republican organization of a precinct be allowed to defeat a Democratic candidate and have the returns go in to the election commissioners as a vote representing the precinct."
Mr. Marks is of the opinion that no amendment to the law can eliminate the rough places, and suggests only the repeal of the law as the one remedy.

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