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November 19, 1909

MOTHER CORNELIA DIES.

Assistant to Superioress at House of
Good Shepherd Passes Away.

Mother Cornelia, assistant to Mother Elizabeth, superioress of the House of Good Shepherd, died yesterday at the home, Twentieth street and Cleveland avenue.

Mother Cornelia had been ill for months, but continued with her work at the House of Good Shepherd until last Thursday. Mother Cornelia was Cornelia Thompkins of St. Louis. The family is one of the most wealthy and widely known in St. Louis. A sister, Mrs. Philip Scanlon, died several weeks ago in St. Louis.

The body of Mother Cornelia will be taken in a special car to St. Louis this morning by her parents, who are in Kansas City. In taking up her work among the inmates of the House of Good Shepherd, whose lives the sisters try to correct, Mother Cornelia gave up her family and prospects for a life of personal help and self-abnegation.

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September 16, 1909

HEBREWS SUE TO PREVENT
MOVING OF THEIR DEAD.

Charge Such and Act on Part of
Owners of Bikur Cholim Cemetery
Would Be Desecration.

An injunction suit to restrain the present owners from moving any of the bodies buried in the Bikur Cholim cemetery was filed in the circuit court yesterday by Sarah Binkowitz, Morris Newberg and others.

The cemetery has been used by Hebrews as a burial place, but not since 1893. It is at the northeast corner of Eighteenth street and Cleveland avenue and occupies about one-fourth block.

In the suit filed yesterday Henry Oppenheimer, Omar E. Robinson and Bikur Cholim Benevolent Association are named as defendants. The plaintiffs are the descendants and the relatives of Julius Newberg and David Binkowitz, who were buried in the cemetery in 1888.

It is alleged in the petition that the lots were sold with the guarantee on the part of the cemetery association that the land would always be maintained as a cemetery. This, it is alleged, is no longer done. In fact, according to the petition, mortgages against the land were foreclosed in 1903.

Charging that the defendants are now threatening to remove the bodies, and adding taht such action means desecration in the eyes of the Hebrew, an injunction forbidding such action is asked. An order also is sought to compel the cemetery asociation to live up to its agreement to maintain the graves in a suitable manner.

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August 8, 1909

TO RAISE $700 FOR THE
HOUSE OF GOOD SHEPHERD.
Irish-American Athletic Club Will
put on Benefit Baseball Game
With Kansas Team.

The city, when it cut the street through at Twentieth street and Cleveland avenue, took forty feet of the property of the home of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd. And that was not all. The sisters are now called upon to pay $700 and the Irish-American Athletic Club has undertaken to raise the money for the home by holding a benefit game at its athletic field at Forty-seventh and Main.

The game will be between the Edgerton, Kas., team, and one of the Irish-American Athletic Club teams. The Kansas team volunteered its services, and as this is considered one of the best baseball organizations in Kansas, considerable interest is shown in the contest.

One of the directors of the Irish-American Athletic Club, who formerly lived at Edgerton, says that when the Edgerton baseball team plays at a neighboring town Edgerton moves with the team. The advance sale of tickets is very encouraging to the club.

A thirty-two page programme will contain the pictures and the line-up of both teams, also a brief history of the Irish-American Athletic Club of Kansas City, portraits of some of their athletes, their officers and directors, the objects and purposes of the club, is being published. These programmes will be distributed to the members of the club and to all who attend the game next Saturday afternoon.

The athletic field of the Irish-American Club is an ideal location. The club has erected a covered grand stand; the entire ground is fenced and the baseball diamond is one of the best in the country.

It is proposed to have a quarter-mile track, handball courts, tennis courts, bowling alleys and every facility for outdoor sports and games of all kinds.

The club now has about 700 members. All are entitled to the privileges of the grounds, excepting when there is a special event of some kind. At these events everybody pays, and all who attend will put up the 25-cent admission for the grandstand seats at the game for the benefit of the Home of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd.

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February 10, 1909

SCHOOL LIMITS EXTENDED.

Board Takes In New Territory in
Southeast Part of City.

Notice has been served on the county clerk by the board of education that the school limits have been extended to take in a territory in the southeastern part of the city. The land taken in lies between Prospect and Agnes avenues, from Thirty-fifth to Ninety-ninth streets, and between Agnes and Cleveland avenues, from Thirty-fifth to Thirty-seventh streets.

The property in question is now subject to taxation for city school purposes. The school board has the right to extend the limits after being authorized to do so by a vote of the residents of the district in question.

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January 20, 1908

LOSS OF LOVE
CAUSES SUICIDE.

EARL LEMMON SHOOTS HIM-
SELF IN THE HEAD.

GIRL BREAKS ENGAGEMENT.

"Do Not Trifle With a Man as If He
Were a Dog," the Last
Words by Lem-
mon.
Earl Lemmon.
EARL LEMMON.

Because Nellie Hickey, 2521 Myrtle avenue, had broken her engagement to marry him, Earl Lemmon, 24 years old, killed himself in his room at Twenty-sixth and Mersington streets yesterday afternoon. Less than two hours after he had bed Miss Hickey a cheerful adieu, his body was found lying across a bed in his room, a 38 caliber pistol lying beside it and a wound in the head revealing the course of the bullet. Upon a table near by the coroner found the following letter:

To All of My Friends. Please forgive me for what I am about to do. I have suffered as no one knows in the last four or five months, but cannot stand it any longer. You will find my plicey at Mrs. Hanifin's. One deed to a lot at Thirty-third and Brighton, a deed to two lots on Leeds road in that box also. If hell is any worse than what I have went through with, I am willing to welcome it.Mr. Cook, you will find a few bills unpaid. If my brothers care for me, they owe me enough to pay all my bills. Give my watch to Mr. Cook and my ring to Nellie. You don't konw what I went through with for you, and you shall never know. But be square next time. Do not trifle with a man as if he was a dog, because they bite back. I must stop now. God bless you. Love and best wishes to Nellie. (Signed) EARL.
(P. S.) God forgive me for this. Goodby all. What money I had I lost some six or seven months ago in a freind-turn-you-down-style.


TWENTY KISSES FOR NELLIE.

Beside this letter was found a souvenir postcard with the photograph of a girl upon it. Upon this card, scrawled in the dead man's handwriting, were the words: "Twenty kisses; goodby, Nellie. Be a good girl."

Young Lemmon was employed by Clayton E. Cook of the Home Produce Company at 2446 Cleveland. He roomed in the home of Clarence Stumpff, a fellow employe, in a cottage near Twenty-sixth and Mersington streets. During the eighteen months he had been in the employ of Mr. Cook he was said to have been a sober, industrious, hard working young man. He had managed to save a little money which he had invested in real estate.

Early yesterday morning he called at the home of Miss Hickey. About n oon he returned to his room and ended his life.

Miss Hickey is the daughter of Lawrence Hickey, a Missouri Pacific switchman. She was very much distressed at the news. When she was seen at her home several hours after the suicide, her eyes were swollen with weeping.


JEALOUS OF THE GIRL.
Miss Nellie Hickey, Lost Love of Earl Lemmon.
MISS NELLIE HICKEY.
For the Loss of Whose Love Earl Lemmon Ended His Life.

"Earl and I have been sweethearts from childhood," she said. "We have been betrothed for several years. But he was insanely jealous of me, and several months ago I broke off the engagement on that account. At that time he threatened to kill himself, but I never thought he would do it. He seemed very much grieved because I had received attentions from other young men, but I didn't think ghe took it so much to heart. This morning he called upon me and we chatted pleasantly. When he started home, he called out, 'Goodby Nell,' very cheerfully. There was nothing in his manner that indicated he was thinking of killing himself.

The story was corroborated by Mr. and Mrs. Hickey. Both said there had never been any parental objections to the affair between their daughter and Lemmon, and that ever since the engagement was broken off the young man had been on terms of close friendship with the family.

Lemmon has a brother, bert Lemmon, who lives at the home of a Mrs. Hanifin at 3315 East Twenty-second street. He has four other brothers, a foster sister, who lives in Armourdale, and his father, who lives in California.

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July 27, 1907

COMPLAINS OF A 'HOME'

CHILDREN MISTREATED BY AT-
TENDANTS, IT IS ALLEGED.


Matron at Joseph's Home Denies
Charges Made by Mrs. Ambie
Russell -- Juvenile Court to
Decide Next Monday.


Joseph Home, 2610 Cleveland Avenue
THE JOSEPH HOME, 2610 CLEVELAND AVENUE.

Upon a complaint of Mrs. Ambie Russell, who has had four children in Joseph's home at 2610 Cleveland avenue since last Thanksgiving day, petitions were filed in the juvenile court yesterday afternoon alleging that the children were neglected.


Two of them, Irene, 10, and Katie, 7 years old were found at the home, taken to the detention home and later to the day nursery of the Institutional church by Probation Officer Edgar Warden. The other two, Earl, 13, and Eddie, 14 years old, were not found at the home. Subpoenas were issued for Mrs. Anna Baker, manager of the home; Mrs. Nellie Shaw, who is usually in charge, and for Mrs. Leslie Lewald, an employe, to appear before Judge Goodrich of the juvenile court Monday morning.

In a signed statement which Mrs. Russell made to Humane Officer Frank McCrary yesterday afternoon she charges that Mrs. Lewald and Frances Robinson, a negro woman who was until recently employed at Joseph's home, frequently punished the children by strangling them in basins of water and by beating them in the face until their little noses bled.



ARE NEGLECTED, WOMAN SAYS.
"There are about thirty children in the home and they are not properly clothed and fed," Mrs. Russell says in her statement. "I have bought clothes during the last eight weeks for my children and upon one occasion when I visited the home I saw a dress I had taken out for Katie on another child and Katie was dressed in rags.

"One one occasion during my stay Mrs. Shaw, an assistant to Mrs. Baker, struck Earl with a stick and then hit him on the nose with her hand and dragged him off to bed. I went to his room and found his pillow saturated with blood."

Mrs. Russell was deserted by her husband four years ago in Herrin, Ill. she has lived in Kansas City several months and when she became ill went with her children to the Joseph home. Several weeks ago she left the home by request because it was said that she had spoken disparagingly of the place to prospective contributors to its support. Mrs. Russell is now employed at the Hotel Kupper.


WHAT AN OFFICER FOUND.


Edgard Warden, who brought the Russell girls to the detention home yesterday, reported that he had found Mrs. Shaw to be a very pleasant woman, and that the children seem to like her. He also said that the home has solicitors working in nineteen states. There are about thirty children there.


The two little Russell girls were neatly dressed when brought to the detention home. They said they and the other children at Joseph's home attended the Greenwood school, Twenty-seventh and Cleveland streets. They looked bashful and would not answer when asked if they had had enough to eat and were well treated.

The Associated Charities, through G. F. Damon, secretary, issued a circular December 5, 1906, containing what purports to be a history of Mrs. Baker.

Mrs. Nellie Shaw, the matron in charge of Joseph's home, emphatically denies the charges made by Mrs. Russell. Mrs. Shaw was formerly assistant matron at the Institutional church.

"There is no truth in any of the charges made against this home," said Mrs. Shaw yesterday. "I came here to take the management of the children in February, and since I have been here I can answer that there has been no cruelty of any kind. I have two children of my own who live here, and I treat them just as I do the others. The only punishment which children ever receive is a spanking. It is necessary where there are so many children that discipline be kept. But no one ever punishes the little ones but myself, and I only spank them whenever it is necessary, with my open hand."


CHILDREN LIKE MRS. SHAW.

The little boys and girls in the home do not seem to be afraid of Mrs. Shaw, but play about her in what seems to be the most affectionate manner.

"I think the boys and girls love me, and I have always wanted them to," said she.

Mrs. Shaw says that Mrs. Russell, who was an inmate of the home with her four children for months without cost, became angry at her because she suggested that some of the money which Mrs. Russell earned after she finally secured a position at the Kupper hotel be spent on the children.

" 'My money is my own,' she said, and seemed angry at the suggestion. 'I'll spend it as I please.' "

Eddie, Mrs. Russell's 14-year-son, was placed by the home on a farm at Arthur, Kas., and his 13-year-old brother Earl is on another farm a few miles from there. Mrs. Shaw says that the boys were not placed in adoption, but were simply put on the farms for a summer's outing. She says that is the custom of the Institution church and other charitable institutions in Kansas City to place children with private families, sometimes for adoption, unless a part at least of their board is paid. Mrs. Russell consented that her two boys be sent to Kansas for the summer, she says.


FOUNDED FOUR YEARS AGO.

St. Joseph's home was founded four years ago by Mrs. Annie Baker, who had run a similar institution for two years in Joplin, Mo. Mrs. Shaw says the home was founded by Mrs. Baker after being left destitute with two children, in order to help mothers where were in a similar condition. It is supported by public subscription.

"The whole trouble is that we do not give an accounting of our finances to the Associated Charities," said Mrs. Shaw. "They have been trying to get us to do this for a long time, and when we consistently refused to make regular financial reports to them they became angry and have been trying to do the home harm ever since.

"We cannot see why we should give up the management of our enterprise to the Associated Charities, who had nothing to do with its beginning or its development."

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