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January 27, 1910

MONUMENT TO GEN. PRICE.

Will Be Erected in Independence by
Daughters of the Confederacy.

A monument to General Sterling Price will likey be erected within a short time on the east side of the Independence court house by the Independence chapter, Daughters of the Confederacy. Yesterday afternoon a delegation from the chapter went before the county court seeking permission, which was granted, providing the monument erected would be an ornameantal one.

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January 24, 1910

DISLIKES TO HANDLE
BONES OF QUANTRELL.

Historical Society Clerks at Topeka
Not So Enthusiastic About
Grewsome Relic.

TOPEKA, Jan. 23. -- If some person, in some manner, could slip into the relic vault of the State Historical Society and steal the old, dry bones of Quantrell, the famous guerrilla, he would confer a great favor upon the clerks of the historical society, even though he riled the temper of George W. Martin, the boss of the shop.

"Oh, how I hate to rattle those old, dry bones," said one of the clerks, as he exhibited them for the nineteenth time today to visitors. "Why, I pull them out, shake them around and tell about them so much that I actually detest the things."

Everybody who goes to the historical rooms wants to see Quantrell's bones. Secretary Martin says they are a great drawing card, and that they are one of the chief relics of his department. But he doesn't have to handle them or exhibit them. The clerks must do that.

For fear they will be stolen, Mr. Martin keeps them in the vault, and a special trip must be made to see them, the medal which Victor Hugo, the Frenchman, gave Mrs. John Brown and the Ford theater program which contains some splotches of Lincoln's blood. Officials around the state house know how the clerks detest handling the bones and always tell visitors to be sure to ask to see them.

The clerks do not handle the bones as tenderly as Secretary Martin does. They yak them around, shake them together, hoping, no doubt, they will fall to pieces.

"I guess the only way to get rid of them is to wear them out," said a clerk, "and they don't seem to wear very fast. I believe they will be here when Gabriel blows his trumpet the last time unless someone should carry them off."

When the bones were first donated to the historical society a great howl went up from some of the old free state men. They declared that it was an insult to exhibit the bones of the old guerrilla who sacked Lawrence and killed so many people. But Secretary Martin held on to them with a strong grip and finally beat down public criticism. Still he can't subdue his own clerks. They are still in rebellion.

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January 20, 1910

TWO SERGEANTS STEP UP.

Commissions as Lieutenants for
James and Anderson.

The first promotion of any moment to be made by the present police board took place nar the close of the meeting yesterday when Sergeants Robert E. L. James and Frank H. Anderson, who have given the better parts of their lives to the service, were made lieutenants. Anderson is said to be a Republican and James is a Democrat. Neither man got much encouragement from former boards though their records are both clean.

Anderson, now assigned to desk work at No. 3 station on the Southwest boulevard, went on the force November 9, 1889. On account of his intelligence and adaptability for the work he was assigned for m any eyars to duty in the city clerk's office where he served papers in condemnation suits and did clerical work. On January 9, 1907, while H. M. Beardsley was mayor, Anderson was made a sergeant by a Democratic board. His promtion is said to have been due to former Mayor Beardsley's efforts.

Lieutenant James went on the department as a probationary officer July 22, 1889, a few months before Lieutenant Anderson. As a patrolman James has walked every beat in Kansas City. On July 22, 1902, he was promoted to sergeant.

James early showed particular efficiency in handling large crowds. While outside sergeant at No. 2 station in the West Bottoms during the destructive flood of June, 1903, James distinguished himself.

Last July, when still a sergeant, James was assigned by the police board to Convention hall as instructor in the matter of police duty. This pertained to the old men, already on the force as well as new recruits. In all 241 policemen were instructed in groups of from twenty-five to seventy and their instruction lasted from seventy-two to ninety hours per group. Lieutenant James also had charge of the initial opening of Electric park a few years ago. For two weeks he has had charge of the desk at No. 7 station in Sheffield. Lieutenant James was born at Tipton, Cooper county, Mo., October 17, 1867. His father, Dr. P. T. James, was assistant surgeon general to General Sterling Price of the Confederate army. Some time after the war the family moved to Holden, Mo.. Lieutenant James is married and has four children. He is a brother of Dr. Samuel C. James, a member of the general hospital staff of visiting surgeons and physicians.

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January 19, 1910

BENEFACTIONS SWOPE HOBBY.

Judge John C. Gage Says He Talked
of Them Forty Years Ago.

The theory that Colonel Thomas H. Swope may have been poisoned to keep him from making a new will, devising $1,000,000 to Kansas City, or some charitable institution, is given little credence by Judge John C. Gage, life-long friend of the millionaire benefactor.

"If old Tom Swope was poisoned to prevent this will from being made, he would have been murdered years ago," said Judge Gage. "For the past forty years he has been talking of making a great bequest to Kansas City. About every time we would meet he would tell me what he intended to do. We used to get tired of this, and tell him we did not think he was going to give a cent to Kansas City.

"He did not speak in private of his intended bequests. He told many of his friends he expected to change his will. If there was a plot to kill him to prevent him making the new will leaving over a million to Kansas City that otherwise would go to his relatives, it would have been made years before Colonel Swope finally died.

"When Tom Swope was as poor as the other boys, and when when we thought he never had a show of becoming a rich man, he used to tell us that he intended to make a large bequest to Kansas City, at his death. It was one of his earliest ambitions. In those days we paid little attention to it."

Judge Gage and Colonel Swope roomed together, and occupied the same office at the opening of the war. The former had a fox hound to which his roommate became greatly attached.

"It was in 1862, when Kansas City was garrisoned by Union soldiers," said Judge Gage. "The dog was running along Missouri avenue with Tom. A Union soldier fired at the dog, shooting it through the breast. That was the only time I ever saw Tom really mad. He started after that soldier and chased him down Missouri avenue to Grand, then down Grand for several blocks. He was compelled to give up the chase when the soldier had winded him . The dog did not die, so Tom's wrath was somewhat appeased. Something would have happened, however, if he had caught that soldier."

Old friends of the "colonel" say that he seldom used "cuss" words. It was only when exceedingly angry that he would let out a "damn." He would jerk the word out short and preface each one by spitting.

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January 13, 1910

REBEL BILL NOT COUNTERFEIT.

Person Using One Can Be Tried Only
on False Pretense Charge.

To pass a worthless Confederate greenback is no violation either of the state or federal law, decided the prosecuting attorney's office yesterday, and the only charge that might be entertained is the obtaining of money under false pretenses.

A five-dollar bill, made in 1862 by the state of Georgia and issued by the Merchants and Planters' bank for the states of the Southern Confederacy, was passed a short time ago on Mrs. Max Joffey, Missouri avenue and Locust street. The woman who presented it bought 60 cents worth of goods and was given $4.60 in change. The case was presented to the United States district attorney.

"This five-dollar bill is not counterfeit, as at one time it was genuine legal tender," said Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, yesterday. "The only charge the woman can be tried for is false pretense. No warrant has been issued."

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December 28, 1909

HEIRS WAIT ON CONGRESS.

Civil War Claim, Allowed by Court,
Must Be Paid This Session.

For three years the heirs of Solomon Young, who died in 1892, have been waiting for congress to appropriate $3,800, allowed by the court of claims at Washington . It is thought that congress during its present session will take some action.

Solomon Young owned a farm in Grandview during the Civil war. A detachment of the Union army confiscated a herd of cattle and some horses which belonged to him. At the close of the war Young put in a claim for damages.

For years this claim laid in the files of the war department and was forgotten. When he died, in 1892, the estate was divided among the six heirs.

Soon after this an attorney in Washington unearthed the Young claim from the files. Suit was brought and in 1906 the court allowed $3,800 for the cattle and horses. The Young estate was immediately opened up, on the expectation that congress would pay the claim. Mrs. Henrietta L. Young, the widow, was appointed administratrix. Three years they have waited and congress has neglected to act.

Last Week Mrs. Young died. A new administrator is to be appointed for the Young estate. It will not be settled finally until the claim is paid by congress.

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December 27, 1909

DREAMS HER STRONG HOBBY.

Mrs. Virginia Gentry, Who Pre-
dicted Steamship Disaster, Is Here.

A woman who says she is the founder of a new sect called the Divine Scientist Healers and predicted the Vallencia disaster in San Francisco in 1906 recently arrived in this city and is living at 1327 Troost avenue. She is Mrs. Virginia Gentry, widow of the late Colonel R. T. Gentry, who commanded a regiment in General Price's army in Missouri and was well known in state politics a score of years ago.

"When my husband died three years ago he left an estate in this vicinity and I am here looking after it," said Mrs. Gentry. "I will probably reside here permanently.

"Most of the talk we hear of people being cured by the laying on of hands is rot. I think Madame Palladino is a faker and I doubt that she can do what she claims she can without pulling wires in one way or another. Maybe that is because her theory of life and things generally differs from mine. My strong hobby is dreams.

"The day before the Vallencia sailed on its fatal cruise I was in San Francisco with my late husband and the captain of the ship was our guest. He told me a dream he had about being stuck in the sand of a desert. Like a flash the inspiration came to me that it was all up with the captain and I told him so. He believed my warning and tried to be excused from the trip."

Mrs. Gentry has the Vallencia flag, an immense piece of woolen bunting. The captain had jokingly promised her that if his ship went down it should be hers and she obtained it from the steamship company by proving that she made the prediction that the good ship would come to grief.

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November 12, 1909

THOMAS G. BEAHAM
SUCCUMBS AT 68.

FAULTLESS STARCH FOUNDER A
KANSAS CITY BUSINESS MAN
FOR 22 YEARS.

Veteran Army Man Made This City
the Scene of His Many Ac-
tivities -- Became Ill
Last Summer.
Thomas G. Beaham, Faultless Starch Founder & President
THOMAS G. BEAHAM.

Thomas G. Beaham, for twenty-two years a Kansas City business man, died at his home, 2940 Troost avenue, at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Mr. Beaham had been ill since last summer, while on a hunting and fishing trip on the Nipegon river in Canada.

Mr. Beaham was born in Cambridge, O., the only child of John and Harriett Beaham. His boyhood was spent in Muscatine, Ia., where he enlisted September, 1861, in the Union army as a commissary sergeant of the Second Iowa volunteer cavalry in the Civil war. He was appointed second lieutenant December 1, 1861, and promoted to first lieutenant a month later. Mr. Beaham was detached from his regiment in April, 1862, and assigned to duty as aide-de-camp on the staff of General Gordon Granger, commanding a cavalry division in Mississippi, until August, 1862. On November 19, 1863, he was appointed and commissioned major and aide-de-camp of United States volunteers and assigned to the staff of General Granger. While in the department of the Cumberland, in the military division of the West, he participated in the advance and siege of Corinth; occupation of Corinth and pursuit to Boonville; pursuit of Van Dorn to Duck river and defense of Franklyn against Van Dorn's attack. He was in the battle of Chickamauga, Orchard ridge and Missionary hill, and many other historic battlefields. He resigned September 12, 1864, and was honorably discharged from the service. Mr. Beaham was a lifelong friend of Captain Gordon Taylor of Cincinnati, O., who was on the staff of General Granger.

Shortly after the war he went to Cincinnati, O., where he engaged in the wholesale paint and glass business. In 1878 he moved to Zanesville, where he lived until 1887, when he came to Kansas City and entered into partnership with E. O. Moffatt in the whlesale coffee, tea and spice company. The company was formerly Smith and Moffatt, but Mr. Smith was killed in the cyclone of that year and the firm was started anew under the name of Beaham & Moffatt. At that time Mr. Beaham was living with his family in Independence, Mo.

It was early in the history of the firm of Beaham & Moffatt that the Faultless Starch was originated as a specialty. Shortly afterwards Mr. Moffatt returned to the grain trade and the business was conducted as the Beaham Manufacturing Company. Owing to the growth of the starch department the coffee, tea and spice business was disposed of and for several years the business was conducted as the Faultless Starch Company, unincorporated, Mr. Beaham being the sole owner. In 1900 he moved to Kansas City from Independence and in 1903 the business was incorporated as the Faultless Starch Company with Mr. Beaham as president and Gordon T. Beaham as secretary.

Mr. Beaham is survived by a mother, Mrs. Harriett Beaham, 91 years old. Mrs. Beaham has been living with her son for the past seventeen years. His wife, one son and two daughters also survive him. Gordon T. Beaham, the only son, was named after his lifelong friend, Captain Gordon Taylor of civil war fame. Two daughters, Edna and Helen, reside at home.

Mr. Beaham was a member of the University, Country, Midday and Commercial Clubs; also a member of the Loyal Legion. He was very fond of fishing and hunting and was a member of several shooting clubs. For a number of years he spent his summers in Lake Miltona, Minn.

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October 9, 1909

FREDERICK GEHRING DIES.

Editor of Staats Zeitung Passes
Away at 68 Years.

Frederick Gehring, editor of the Missouri Staats Zeitung, the offices of which are located at 304 West Tenth street, died at 7 o'clock yesterday morning at the German hospital. Mr. Gehring was 68 years old, having been born in Griessen, Germany, March 4, 1841. One relative, a son, Carl, employed by the Moore Transfer Company, survives.

The funeral services will be conducted from the home, 3152 Oak street, at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Burial in Mount Washington cemetery.

Mr. Gehring was secretary of the German-American Citizens' Association and a member of the Turner society. In both of these organizations his long residence in the city, his position as editor of the only German weekly paper in the country and his evident honest and ability as a worker for the good of the community gave him prestige.

Coming from Germany when he was 12 years old, Mr. Gehring's parents took him to Lafayette, Ind., where he grew to manhood. When the civil war broke out he enlisted in the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteer infantry June 14, 1861. He was mustered out of the service in June, 1864, carrying a scar from a minie ball wound with him into private life.

After marrying Miss Catherine May of Indanapolis, immediately after the close of the war, Mr. Gehring moved to Springfield, Ill., where he started the German Free Press. He was twice elected to the city council in Springfield, and from 1876 to 1877 was a member of the legislature.

Mr. Gehring came to Kansas City twenty-five years ago and established the Staats Zeitung, or State News, in 1894. His wife died last December.

A special meeting of the Turner Society will be called at 8 o'clock this evening to arrange for the funeral.

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September 28, 1909

J. L. NORMAN, SCHOOL
BOARD PIONEER, DEAD.

SERVED WITH PUBLIC EDUCAT-
ION FOR TWENTY YEARS.

Appointed Secretary Year Ago After
Retirement From the Abstract
Business -- Funeral Arrange-
ments Not Made.
Joseph L. Norman, School Board Pioneer.
THE LATE JOSEPH L. NORMAN.

Joseph Lafayette Norman, civil war veteran, compiler of the first set of abstract books in Kansas City, member of the school board for twenty years and its secretary for the last year, died at his home, 816 West Thirty-ninth street at 10:15 o'clock last night after an illness of two months. The funeral arrangements probably will be announced today, by which time a son who is in Mexico, and another who is in California can be heard from.

Joseph Lafayette Norman was born at Hickory Hill, Ill, October 21, 1841. In 1857, the year following the death of his mother, the family moved to Greeley, Kas., and took up a homestead there. A year later Mr. Norman and his father returned to Illinois. In the fall of 1859 Mr. Norman and his father came back West and located at what was Westport, Mo., one mile west of what is now Fortieth street and State Line. The deceased conducted a private school in Westport, and he had to close it at the outbreak of the civil war, August 14, 1862, the day of the battle of Independence, Mo.
ONE SON AN ARMY OFFICER.

Mr. Norman closed his school and with five of his pupils reported at Fort Union on the west side of the city and tendered their services to the government. He served for three years as a member of company A of the Twelfth regiment of Kansas volunteer infantry. At the battle of Westport on his twenty-third birthday, Mr. Norman was aide to General S. R. Curtis and carried across the field of battle an important message under an extremely dangerous fire. His first wife, Miss Martha Jane Puckett, a native of Virginia, died January 1, 1901.

They had five children, the oldest of whom, Captain Trabor Norman, is at present in the infantry, in Southern California. Another son, Joseph L, Jr., is in Mexico. Fred, Frank and Miss Jennie Norman are the other children.

OF A MILITARY FAMILY.

On June 25, 1903 Mr. Norman married Miss Katherine Gent of Kansas City. A son, Howard, was born of this union. Mr. Norman was a member of Farragu-Thomas Post, G. A. R. No. 8, and was also a Mason. H e was the first quartermaster of the Third Regiment N. G. M. In politics he was a Republican.

All of his ancestors were inclined to the military life. His brother, Calvin M., his father, Jones, and his wife's father, William E. Plunkett, all served in the civil war.

His paternal grandfather, Joseph Norman, served in the war of 1812, and his great-grandfather served in the revolutionary war, enlisting from North Carolina.

Mr. Norman commenced the work of getting up a set of abstract books at Independence, Mo. In October, 1865, and in the spring of 18657, with Lafayette Trabor he opened an abstract office. Later the Trabor interests were sold to Richard Robertson. Mr. Norman retired from this business a year ago.

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September 14, 1909

'CAP' PHELAN, SOLDIER
OF FORTUNE, IS DEAD.

NAME GRAVEN IN WAR HIS-
TORY AS BLOCKADE RUNNER.

Staunch Irish-American Patriot
Mixed in Many Attempts to Free
Ireland -- Stabbed for Expos-
ing Clan ne Gael Plot.
Captain Thomas Phelan, Soldiler of Fortune.
CAPTAIN THOMAS PHELAN.

The death of Captain Thomas Phelan, Irish-American patriot and soldier of fortune, which occurred at 2:30 o'clock last Saturday afternoon, in Bremerton, Wash., ended a life full of romance and a checkered career in war and politics. Early in life he was bitten with the wanderlust, and during the early 60s and 70s helped to make history, not only in America, but in Canada and Ireland. Captain Phelan was 76 years old and leaves a widow and four children.

Being a native of Ireland, Captain Phelan throughout his life and did all in his power to bring freedom to Erin. He was born near the town of Tipperary and came to America about 1857, locating at Independence, Mo. He married Miss Alice Cox of that city.

During the early part of Captain Phelan's life he was embroiled in many attempts to free his native country from the yoke of England. Shortly after his marriage in Independence he enlisted as a volunteer in the Seventh Missouri regiment of the Union army and fought with that regiment throughout the war. He rose from the ranks to a captain. He was in many of the important battles.

NAME IN WAR HISTORY.

One of his daring acts committed during the progress of the war was at the siege of Vicksburg. It was necessary to take a steamboat loaded with cotton and other products, and munitions of war, down the river and Captain Phelan was delegated to run the blockade.

Transferring bales of hay for cotton around the edge of the boat he succeeded in getting safely through the lines. His name appears in Civil war history as that of the man responsible for breaking the blockade.

In the late 60's he gained fame and notoriety by engaging in the Fenian raid from the United States into Canada in a futile attempt to occupy Canada and make it a base of supplies from which to carry on warfare with England for the freedom of Ireland.

The Irish in America congregated about Ridgeway, Canada, for the purpose of an uprising and gaining a stronghold in the Canadian country. Some 1,400 Irish left the United States for this purpose, but boats on the waterways cut off a portion, and they failed to land in Canada. A battle in which many persons were killed on both sides was fought by the Irishmen against the Queen's Own regiment.

While making a visit to his home country, Captain Phelan learned that the Clan na Gael was planning to blow up an English ship named the Queen. Although against England, Captain Phelan did not believe in destroying innocent passengers, and therefore notified the English ship people. In some manner his part became public, and O'Donovan Rossa, editor of the Irishman of New York, attacked his loyalty in the paper.

STABBED THIRTEEN TIMES.

The incident occurred during the term as mayor here of Lee Talbot. Captain Phelan was called to New York to be given an opportunity to explain matters relative to his informing the British of the intended blowing up of the Queen.

Close friendship had before existed between Rossa and Phelan, and the latter did not realize that he was to be the victim of a trap. He went to New York and entered Rossa's office. While there an endeavor to assassinate him was made by an Irishman living in the East. Captain Phelan was stabbed thirteen times and received a broken arm in the attack. He was confined in a hospital in New York for many months on account of his injuries. The news that he gave the information to the English leaked out through a story of the plot printed in Kansas City and written by Frank P. Clarke, a former newspaper man, now living here.

Between the years of 1882 and 1888 Captain Phelan was superintendent of the Kansas City workhouse. He was greatly interested in politics and was a staunch Republican all of his life. When the criminal court was instituted in Jackson county he was appointed clerk of the court and was the first to fill this position. Under Mayor John Moore he served as superintendent of public works. While Colonel R. T. Van Horn was a member of Congress Captain Phelan received the appointment of captain of police of Washington, D. C.

CHALLENGED COUNT ESTERHAZY.

After the civil war he organized Company D of the Third Regiment and was a captain in the regiment for many years. Later he organized Battery B. For the last seven years he had been in charge of a navy yard at Bremerton, Wash., where ships of the United States are repaired. He was holding this position when he died. Captain Phelan belonged to the G. A. R., but was not a member of any other organization.

Captain Phelen also figured very prominently in a duel which was never pulled off. The participants were to have been a Captain McCafferty and Captain Phelan. Rifles were the weapons chosen, and seconds and grounds had been picked when friends interfered.

At one time a number of Irish left America to aid Ireland, whose sons were to rise against England upon a certain day. Chester, England, was the place of the rendezvous for the Irish-Americans. Arms had been secured for their use.

The English troops, however, got wind of the threatened uprising and were sent out in such large forces that the Irish were overawed. The difficulty between Captains McCafferty and Phelan arose out of the means to be used at this time in trying to free Ireland.

Captain Phelan's family resides at 3205 Washington street. Dr. Y. J. Acton of Bremerton notified the family of the death. The body was buried yesterday afternoon in the Soldiers and Sailors' cemetery at Bremerton, Wash., by Captain Phelan's special request.

For many years Captain Phelan traveled over the country giving exhibitions of shooting and fencing. He was a crack shot with pistols and rifles, and was a famous swordsman.

Captain Phelan, while the Dreyfus affair in France was at its height, challenged Count Esterhazy, accuser of Dreyfus, to a duel with swords, to be fought anywhere in the world.

Besides his widow, Mrs. John Young and Miss Annie Phelan, daughters, and two sons, Robert Phelan, a police detective, and Thomas Phelan, survive.

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September 24, 1909

CAPT. A. P. ASHBROOK DEAD.

Served in Volunteer Regiment
Throughout Civil War.

Captain Aaron P. Ashbrook, senior member of the Ashbrook Investment Company, with offices in the Sheidley building, died as the result of a paralytic stroke yesterday morning at his home, 1400 College avenue. He had been ill nearly a month.

Captain Ashbrook was born 76 years ago on a farm in Fairfield county, O. When the civil war began he raised a company of light infantry for the Seventeenth Ohio volunteers, and served until the close as captain. Following the military example of his father one son, Lieutenant Roy M. Ashbrook, is in the army, and is now stationed at Fort McPherson, Ga.

After a short period spent in the dry goods business in Fairfield, Captain Ashbrook married Miss Margaret Faine and moved with her to Kansas City, where he engaged in the real estate business. That was twenty-five years ago. Fifteen years ago, feeling his health failing, he retired from active business, and since then he has traveled in search of health. His wife has been dead many years.

Funeral arrangements have not been made, but it is thought the funeral will be in Harrisonville, Mo.

The following children survive:

Lieut. R. M. Ashbrook, U. S. A., Fort McPherson, Ga.; T. P. Ashbrook, Kent, Ill.' Mrs. Caroline Oldham, Kansas City; Mrs. Addie Sexton, Mrs. Blanche Hutchens, Mrs. Minette Galt and Miss Faye Ashbrook, all of Alhambra, Cal.

The will of Captain Ashbrook was filed yesterday for probate, and Mrs. Oldham was appointed administratix by the court. The will leaves $500 to Margaret Faye Ashbrook and the balance in equal shares to his other children and two grandchildren. No value is placed on the estate.

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August 22, 1909

GRANDMA CAMPBELL'S
FAMILY OF CHILDREN.

EIGHTY-SEVEN LIVING DE-
SCENDANTS -- SHE IS 84.

Anniversary of Her Birth Was Cele-
brated Yesterday -- Two Sons
Are Ministers -- Five Weigh
Over 200 Pounds Each.
Four of the Five Generations in Milbra R. Campbell's Family.

Six children, twenty-eight grandchildren, fifty-two great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

The foregoing are the living descendants of Mrs. Milbra R. Campbell, whose eighty-fourth birth anniversary was celebrated yesterday at the home of her son, George W. Campbell, 728 Wabash avenue. All the five sons who attended are over six feet tall and weigh more than 200 pounds each. They are Rev. John A. Campbell of Chillicothe, Tex., Rev. W. T. Campbell of Pueblo, Col., both ministers in the Baptist church, James H., George W. and David Campbell, all engaged in the live stock commission business in this city. Mrs. E. J. Henry, the only daughter, 1221 Bales avenue, was detained at home on account of illness.

At 1 o'clock a dinner was served to the immediate relatives attending the anniversary. During the afternoon an informal reception was held for relatives and friends. A photographer took pictures of "Grandma" Campbell, as she is familiarly known, and her five stalwart sons. After that group pictures of those present, representing many generations, were taken.

FIVE GENERATIONS.

The accompanying photograph represents but four generations of the Campbell family. There are now five. This picture was taken eleven years ago and shows Mrs. Campbell, her only daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth J. Henry, her son, Charles D. Henry and the latter's daughter, Miss Dorothy J. Henry, now in her sixteenth year.

The Rev. W. T. Campbell, who is here with his four children from Pueblo, Col., where he is pastor of the First Baptist church, is not a stranger in Kansas City. He held several pastorates in this city and organized what is now known as the Olive street Baptist church. He will occupy the pulpit there this morning and tonight. Rev. Mr. Campbell was also a pastor of a church in Independence, Mo., for four years.

The ancestors of this sturdy family, in which there has been no deaths since 1864, came from Scotland and the North of Ireland. In 1836 the father and mother immigrated from Tennessee and settled among the early pioneers in Northwestern Arkansas.

IN PRICE'S RAID.

The father, who was born in 1826, served in the United States army during the Mexican war of 1847. When volunteers were being called for to stay the failing fortunes of the Confederacy he volunteered to the governor of Arkansas in 1861 and was made captain of Company D, Fourteenth Arkansas infantry. After being engaged in many battles he surrendered with his company at Fort Hudson, July 8, 1863, and was made a prisoner of war. He died shortly afterward of a disease contracted in the army.

J. H. Campbell, the oldest brother, and John A. Campbell, now a minister, enlisted in the Confederate army later on and were with General Price in most of his big fights, and with Price's raid into Missouri. John was severely wounded in the battle of the Little Blue and captured, spending the rest of the war time in a military prison at Indianapolis, Ind. J. H. Campbell served with Price until the surrender at Shreveport, La., June 9, 1865. Both brothers were in the same company.

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August 21, 1909

FEW QUANTRELL'S MEN THERE.

Former Guerrillas Are More Inter-
ested in the Crop Prospects.

Only twenty-five men responded yesterday morning at the roll call of the Quantrell guerrillas, now in reunion in Independence. Cole Younger was not present, being on a lecture tour, the subject of his lecture being "Keep Straight." Frank James, another noted guerrilla, is down in Oklahoma in the Big Pasture, farming, and did not have time to attend. James has not attended any of the reunions since his noted speech made in the Independence court house yard, in which he declared that his friends were in the North and that he was never turned down except by those of the Southland.

The headquarters of the reunion were in the Brown building, North Main street. Here the scattered membership met and registered and it was here that it was noted that among the absent ones were John C. Hope, ex-sheriff of Jackson county, and Cyrus Flannery Wolf of Bates county, both having died within the past year. Captain Benjamin Morrow was present, Lieutenant Levi Potts of Grain Valley and Warren Welch were busy among the veteran guerrillas. Captain Gregg, who has been in about as many tight places as the next guerrilla who followed Quantrell, was present with his family. Also Dr. L. C. Miller of Knobnoster.

There was no formality about the reunion. "They just met and that was all there was to it," was the way one of them expressed himself. Some of those from Kansas City and nearby points brought well-filled dinner baskets, but the greater portion of those present had to go to restaurants. It was a day of reminiscent stories for the guerrillas and the oft repeated stories of the civil war were gone over and over again. Gabe Parr, who as a boy shot his way to freedom, yet lives, and others with equally hair raising stories were present and passed the day, telling of the yesterdays of their early manhood. The thing that interested these men most was the state of the crops.

The veterans will hold another session today and adjourn, in all probability to meet in Independence next year.

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July 27, 1909

HELPED MAKE HISTORY
IN KANSAS CITY KAS.

BYRON JUDD, RESIDENT SINCE
1857, IS DEAD.

Held Many Positions of Trust and
equipped First Horse Car Line
in the City -- Was 85
Years Old.

In the death last night of Byron Judd, a pioneer resident of Kansas City, Kas., the city was deprived of perhaps its most widely known and lovable characters. He was a man of rare ability, and was noted for his keen, incisive mind. Every enterprise of worth which marked the early transition of a straggling Indian village into the metropolis of the state is closely interwoven with the name and personality of Byron Judd. Although his advanced age of late years prevented his active participation in the affairs of the city, his mind retained the vigor of youth and his counsel upon questions of moment was highly valued and eagerly sought.

ANCESTORS IN MAYFLOWER.

Byron Judd was born August 13, 1824, at Otis , Berkshire county, Mass. His parents were farmers and pointed with pride that their ancestry could be clearly traced to the landing of the Mayflower. He received his education at the state normal and at Southwick academy. As a young man in his ho me town he held many minor offices, among which were school commissioner, township assessor and selectman.

In 1855 he left his native state and journeyed westward to Iowa, being made deputy land recorder at Des Moines, a position he held until his removal in 1857 to Kansas City, Kas., or, as it was then known, Wyandotte. In 1869 he was elected a member of the board of aldermen of the city. In 1863 he was elected county treasurer of Wyandotte county. He was married in 1865 to Mrs. Mary Louise Bartlett.

During the early days of Wyandotte he engaged in the banking and land business which he carried on for many years, having been the first land agent in the city. He was president of the council in 1868 and was elected mayor in 1869. This administration was remarkable for the spirit of enterprise displayed and was in fact the beginning of that civic pride which has since characterized the city.

EQUIPPED FIRST HORSE CAR.

Mr. Judd was made United States commissioner in 1870. In 1871 he organized the First National bank of that city and served as president and cashier of the institution. He remained a director in the bank for many years. In connection with W. P. Overton and Luther Wood he went to St. Louis and purchased the material and equipment for the first horse car line in the city.

He was elected state senator in 1872 and served in that capacity until 1876. Although a staunch Democrat, he was not in sympathy with the border warfare and many of the outrages committed during that period were fearlessly denounced by him.

His is survived by his only daughter, Mrs. Sarah Judd Greenman, public librarian of Kansas City, Kas.

Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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July 17, 1909

HAD GOOD CIVIL WAR RECORD.

Aged Applicant for Parole Says Son
Was Knighted for Bravery.

Anderson J. Barker, 69 years old, was fined $500 Wednesday for running an alleged "fake" employment agency, wore only a pair of overalls and a short-sleeved shirt when he appeared before the board of pardons and paroles yesterday for hearing on his application for parole, but despite the costume his appearance was that of a stately gentleman of the "old school."

After telling of his service to his country during the civil war, during which he was twice breveted for meritorious conduct on the field, tears streamed down his cheeks as he told of how he had reared his two sons, both of whom, he said, were heads of Y. M. C. A. organizations, one in a suburb of Chicago and the other in Calcutta, India.

"For saving the life of Lord Frazier in Calcutta on November 9 last," said the aged man, his eyes suffused with tears, "my boy Ben was made a knight by King Edward VII of England on February 9 of this year. The king also decorated him with a gold medal for bravery. My other son, Edwin, is a thirty-second degree Mason.

"I have been engaged in one business in this city for seven years. The police judge heard only the testimony of a policeman and the complainant, and said: 'Five hundred dollars.' I never committed a crime in my life."

While discussing the matter of parole, Barker said he would withdraw his application, and appeal. He did not wish to bear the stigma of having to report to the secretary every week. The board told him there was no stigma attached to a parole and promised to look into his references today, when he may be granted freedom.

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July 7, 1909

NEGROES MAINTAIN GUARD.

Grizzled Veterans With Springfields
Patrol Dynamite District.

Two ancient negroes, A. L. Jones and Percy Williams, last night did sentry duty in front of the row of cottages on Highland avenue, between Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth streets. It was in this vicinity that a house was wrecked by dynamite early Monday morning after it had been let to negroes.

The negroes who mounted guard last night had both seen service in the civil war in the capacity of teamsters. They were armed with old regulation Springfield rifles. As they paced slowly up and down the plank sidewalk they swapped stories of war times, or kept step to "hay-foot! straw-foot!" according to a system said to have been employed by the drill masters of '61.

"Seems powerful lonely out here," said one of the sentinels, bringing his weapon to parade rest when accosted by a lone reporter in the twilight of a flickering arc lamp.

"When are you relieved?" was asked.

"Not until morning."

"Going to carry that heavy rifle around with you all the time?"

"Certainly; this is soldiering," was the answer.

No clues as to the dynamiting have been discovered by the police of No. 6 station.

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July 6, 1909

REVIEWED BATTLE
OF OLD WESTPORT.

REUNION AND PICNIC ON WOR-
NALL ROAD.

Pioneers Hear of Kansas City's Pre-
carious Situation During Price
Raid -- Purchase of Shaw-
nee Mission Proposed.

The battle of Westport was lived over again by a hundred of the city's oldest inhabitants comprising what is now known as the Historical Society at the old Wornall homestead at Sixty-first street and the Wornall road yesterday.

The occasion was a basket picnic of the society and the object was no more than to celebrate the nation's birthday but so many could recall the time when the Wornall mansion was a hospital and and the cottonwoods around the premises were split and riven in battle that the names of Price, Mulligan and Curtis came easy, and many a gray headed veteran leaned eagerly forward in his seat while the speakers marshaled before them the contending armies.

"It was this way," said Judge John C. Gage, who was a participant in the battle. "General Price driven from behind by the Federal forces left Independence, Mo., and crossed the Blue. It was a serious moment for Kansas City for General Curtis left the town unprotected and crossed over to Wyandotte to his headquarters. For a whole night the city was practically at the mercy of the Confederates.

"It was a good thing the Confederates did not know of this movement of Curtis. By the next day he had returned and when the battle occurred Curtis was on hand and fought like a tiger."

Several of the old residents who were present had never heard of the incident referred to by Judge Gage. Others who were participants on one side or the other remembered it distinctly.

MISPLACED STRATEGY.

"Very little has been said of Curtis's desertion of Kansas City at this time," said the judge after his speech to some of those who had never heard. "It was an incident quickly closed by the prompt return of the federal forces from across the Kaw. You see General Curtis at first believed it might be more important to protect Fort Leavenworth than the city. When he discovered how small a force General Price had and that he was practically running away from federal pressure behind he changed his mind. He was no coward and his retrograde movement was merely misplaced strategy."

Other speakers were Judge John B. Stone, ex-Confederate soldier; Mrs. Laura Coates Reed, Hon. D. C. Allen of Liberty, Mo., Miss Elizabeth B. Gentry, Mrs. Henry N. Ess, William Z. Hickman and Dr. W. L. Campbell. Frank C. Wornall read the Declaration of Independence and Mrs. Dr. Allan Porter read a selection entitled "Two Volunteers." The meeting of the society was presided over by Dr. Campbell, who also introduced the speakers.

A proposition was made by Mrs. Laura Coates Reed to the effect that the society purchase the old Shawnee mission in Johnson county, Kas., for a historical museum to be used jointly by the D. A. R. society and the Historical Society. Mrs. Reed's remarks along this line were seconded by those of Mrs. Henry Ess.

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July 2, 1909

VICTIM OF BUSHWHACKERS?

Skeleton Unearthed on the Old Judge
Shouse Farm.

While excavating for a basement in a house going up at 1611 Elmwood avenue at noon yesterday workmen unearthed the skeleton of a man. A few minutes after the original discovery Arthur Williams, a boy living at 1530 Elmwood, while prodding around in the basement for a stick found a rotten board of a box and several old-fashioned square nails.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky ordered the bones taken to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking establishment, from whence they probably will be taken to the potter's field for burial.

"The basement is located on the old William Shouse farm, near where a house belonging to him was burned by bushwhackers during the fore part of the civil war," said E. M. Bradley, and employe of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, who was born near the place in 1852, and has resided at Sixteenth street and Kensington avenue ever since.

"Mr. Shouse used to be county judge of Jackson county," continued Mr. Bradley. "He was a Southern man, but very outspoken against the bushwhackers. One day they raided and burned his place. It is just possible that some dark deed of the bushwhackers was covered up."

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June 28, 1909

SOLDIER, SAILOR AND
THIEF, IN THE TOILS.

"BOBBY" WRIGHT, 75, SPENDS
NIGHT IN HOLDOVER.

Built Missouri Telegraph Lines in
1862, Then Was Steamboatman
and Later Noted "Hotel
Worker."

"Bobby" Wright, 75 years old, formerly soldier, sailor and now the oldest sneak thief in point of experience int he world, stayed in the city holdover last night to avoid worse trouble. Wright has been in the city several weeks, but was not picked up by the police until yesterday.

Wright confided to a visitor through the bars last night that he was born in New England, but was brought up in the South. When the civil war broke out, however, he was loyal to the Union and joined the army, becoming a private in the miners and sappers' division of the army. He was assigned to General Lyon's army in Missouri and afterwards under General Fremont.

"I put telegraph wires clear across Missouri in the year 1862," he said.

After the war he became a sailor on a merchant ship and was for ten years a steamboatman on the Mississippi river. Then his criminal tendencies became assertive and he became a professional thief, if the records kept by the police departments of many cities are to be believed.

His advent into this city was in 1882 and he has been a frequent visitor since. On almost every visit he was entertained in the city holdover, and he has frequently been convicted in the municipal court.

Wright is whitehaired, partly bald and has white whiskers. He is stooped and tall. His particular branch of thievery is known as hotel work. He walks into a hostelry, goes upstairs, and when he finds a door unlocked enters the room and makes away with all the valuables he can conceal about his person. This is the police report on Bobby Wright.

"He is one of the cleverest men in the country at his trade," said Inspector of Detectives Edward J. Boyle last night.

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June 22, 1909

MAJOR J. M. HADLEY IS DEAD.

Father of Missouri Governor Long
a Prominent Citizen of John-
son County, Kas.

DE SOTO, KAS., June 21. -- Major John M. Hadley, father of Governor H. S. Hadley of Missouri, died here at 2:35 o'clock this afternoon from the effects of a stroke of apoplexy which he suffered June 9. For several days he had lain in an unconscious condition, and the end came quietly. His son and daughter, Mrs. J. W. Lyman, came yesterday and were with their father to last night.

The funeral services, conducted by Rev. W. J. Mitchell, pastor of the M. E. church at this place, an old soldier and personal friend, will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Snyder at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, after which the body will be taken to Olathe and interment made in the family lot.

The active pallbearers here will be Dr. W. M. Marcks, B. S. Taylor, C. S. Becroft, Zimri Gardner, C. K. Dow and B. F. Snyder. At Olathe they will be chosen from the Masonic lodge.

The G. A. R. and the Masonic orders, both of which Major Hadley was an active member, will have charge of the services at Olathe. The honorary pallbearers at Olathe will be Colonel Conover of Kansas City, Major I. O. Pickering, Colonel J. T. Burris, J. T. Little of Olathe, Frank R. Obb and William Pellet of Olathe, all of whom have been personal friends.

The governor reached Kansas City from the capital on a special train Sunday, after receiving word of the critical condition of his father. He was met at the station by a motor car, and made the remainder of the trip to De Soto overland, arriving at the bedside of his father at 1:30 Sunday afternoon.

The elder Hadley was one of the most prominent citizens of De Soto, president of the De Soto State Bank., and connected with many of the institutions of Johnson county, of which he was a pioneer resident.

Major Hadley located at Shawnee Mission in 1855. In October, 1861, he enlisted in the Eighth Kansas Infantry, being rapidly promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, in which capacity he served for fifteen months.

He was later made lieutenant and then captain of the Ninth Kansas Cavalry, and in May, 1865, was promoted to the rank of major, which title clung to him until death. At the close of the war Major Hadley was elected sheriff of Johnson county and served until 1870, when he was made clerk of the district court. He was also head of the extensive flouring mills at De Soto. In 1877 Major Hadley represented his district in the state assembly as senator, being re-elected in 1879.

He was one of the largest land owners in Johnson county. Mrs. Hadley died in 1875.

EXECUTIVE OFFICES CLOSED.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., June 21. -- Acting Governor Humphreys said tonight that as a mark of respect to the governor whose father, Major John M. Hadley, died at De Soto, Kas., this afternoon, the governor's office and those departments in the state house grounds which come under the appointment of the governor would be closed tomorrow. This, he said, was as far as he would go, and that he was governed by the governor's wish in the matter, having talked with him by telephone.

No formal proclamation will be issued, however, as Major Hadley was not a resident of the state.

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June 2, 1909

GROVE OF FAME FOR SWOPE.

Park Board Member Suggests Crit-
tenden Peace Oak as Nucleus.

The peace oak grove planted in Swope park east of the shelter house a year or so ago by the late Ex-Governor T. T. Crittenden, is to serve as the nucleus of a grove of fame in the big park. The idea was suggested at yesterday's meeting of the park board by J. W. Wagner, a member of the board. Mr. Wagner regretted that the city had not been sufficiently far-sighted years ago to ask men of fame visiting Kansas City to plant a tree.

"It is not too late to begin it now," said Mr. Wagner, "and our work will be appreciated by future generations."

He recalled that the battle of Westport during the civil war was fought close by where the Crittenden peace oak is planted, and Mr. Wagner gave notice that at the next meeting he is going to invite Judge John F. Philips and Colonel R. T. Van Horn, who took part in the battle, to plant trees.

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May 30, 1909

IN HIS OWN WORDS.

Ex-Governor's Life Sketch, as Writ-
ten by Himself.

Here is a brief sketch of the ex-governor's life, as given by himself in his own words:

"I was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky., on a farm near Shelbyville. My father, Henry Crittenden, died when I was two years old leaving my mother a widow with five sons; three daughters had died in infancy; the oldest son was not over 15 years of age. My mother was remarried after a few years to Colonel Murry of Cloverport, K y., and five children were born of this union.

"My education was begun at a small subscription school at Shelbyville and continued until I was old enough to go to Center college at Danville, from which I was graduated in the class that had in it Judge John of this city, Governor John Young Brown, W. P. C. Breckinridge, Boyd Winchester and other noted men. I studied law in Frankfort in the office of John J. Crittenden and married in Frankfort Miss Carrie W. Jackson. Soon afterwards I removed to Lexington, Mo., where I opened my first law office. I remained there till the war broke out, when I assisted John F. Philips in raising a regiment of Union soldiers that was sworn in at Georgetown, Pettis county, in 1862, for three years. The regiment was mustered out April 7, 1865 two days before Lee's surrender. At the close of the war I removed to Warrensburg, as feeling still ran high at Lexington. I formed a law partnership with Frances M. Cockrell, who returned from the Confederate service at the close of the war. We practiced law successfully until I was elected to congress in 1872, but the partnership was not dissolved. It continued until General Cockrell was elected United States senator. I remained in congress until 1878 when I refused to be a candidate for re-election. I was nominated for governor over John S. Marmaduke, who became my successor and John A. Hockaday, who had been attorney general under my predecessor.

TEMPESTUOUS ADMINISTRATION.

"The four years of my administration are known to all the older citizens of the state. Phil E. Chappel of this city was state treasurer during my administration,and no state ever had a more honest, faithful or intelligent official.

"My administration was perhaps the most tempestuous in the state's history. We had so many questions of great importance to settle, which agitated every part of the state. One was the great lawsuit with the Hannibal & St. Joseph railroad; as governor I advertised the road for sale. The state won on every point we raised. My efforts to break up the James gang, the most noted band of outlaws ever known in the United States, are familiar to all.

LIFE IN MEXICO.

"After I left Jefferson City I came to Kansas City, in 1885 and resumed the practice of law. I had been out of law office so often in my life and been out of practice so long that I had lost almost all connection with the law and had got behind in my knowledge of the books. I had virtually lost my disposition to return to practice. But the law is a jealous mistress and will not favor any man who deserts it on all occasions.

"I was given the post of consul general to Mexico by President Cleveland in 1893 and absented myself from my own country for four years. My life in Mexico was very pleasant. There were many charms about such a life then and there are more now. I returned to Kansas City and have been here ever since, living a quiet and pleasant life with my family and friends in one of the greatest young cities in the world."

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May 30, 1909

DEATH CLAIMS FORMER
MISSOURI GOVERNOR.

THOMAS T. CRITTENDEN SUC-
CUMBS AT AGE OF 77.

Twice a Member of Congress and a
Consul General, The Governor
Saw State Through Most
Strenuous Period.

EX-GOV. T. T. CRITTENDEN, SR.

Twice a member of congress, once the governor of his state, at another time consul general to Mexico and for the last eight years referee in bankruptcy, Thomas T. Crittenden died at dawn yesterday morning. Thursday afternoon the ex-governor sustained a stroke of apoplexy. While watching a ball game he fell unconscious from his seat and did not regain his mental faculties. Death came at 5:30 yesterday. Interment is to be made tomorrow afternoon in Forest Hill cemetery, after services at the family residence, 3230 Flora avenue.

With the former governor at the time of his death were all surviving members of the family save one, that one now traveling in Japan. The grief stricken family is Mrs. Crittenden, Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., mayor of Kansas City; H. Houston Crittenden, and W. J. Crittenden. It is the latter who was unable to be at his distinguished father's side till the last.

SOLDIER OF RENOWN.

With Governor Crittenden there died a man of parts, and all those parts true facts. He was a soldier of renown, having fought and won battles which turned form this state the tide of slavery. He was a courageous man, having, in the face of the enemy, been appointed to succeed a dismissed brigade commander because his senior had hesitated about making a charge which the division commander knew Crittenden was eager to make. He was a statesman, as his record in the congress of the United States and in Jefferson City shows. He was a man of commerce, as his most excellent direction of international commerce while consul general to Mexico bear out. He was a man of letters, widely read and collecting a magnificent library. He was a judge in equity, as is shown by the last eight years of his public service, and always, he was a gentleman.

Handsome of face, his bearing was striking. The last moment he was on his feet, with the weight of seventy-seven years on his shoulders and those added to by the infirmities of four years in the saddle during the civil war, he was straight as an arrow. Governor Crittenden had the bearing of a courtier. He was gracious always, charming his familiars and captivating his casual acquaintances. He spoke softly, chose his words and ever was anxious to do something for someone else. Never a moneymaker, he lived to see three splendid sons grow up to take care of that part of his affairs. Fond of public places, high ones, the old governor's happiness at seeing one of his sons become mayor of this city was taken by himself as an honor.

A LIFELONG DEMOCRAT.

"Is this governor Crittenden?" would be asked.

"The mayor is my son," he would reply. The old governor enjoyed living all things in life.

He was a most thoughtful man. Obscurity found him delving. Great charities might take care of themselves, he would say, but little ones were hopeless, so he did little ones. Born in Shelby county, Ky., 77 years ago, he was born and bred a Democrat, and lived and died one, but he was a rampant Union man and helped raise a Union regiment with which he kept in the field throughout the war. He was of the Washington type, if history is to be believed.

Governor Crittenden believed in the dignity of the occasion. The men who fought under him and who yet live say he was almost a martinet within the regiment and at the same time a father to the men. As governor he lived up to his high office. When Madam Patti first visited Missouri someone proposed a ceremonial visit. Patti said it was like going to Windsor Castle. And yet this same man undertook to break up the James gang, summarily granted a pardon to a malefactor who had been the agent of destruction and paternally took the hand of a surviving member of the gang, Frank James. Nor did the kindly man ever lose sight of the objects of his official stoicism, for one of his constant correspondents and visitors was this same Frank James.

HE NEVER FORGOT.

No situation was too perplexing for Governor Crittenden. He was governor when Missouri was in the transition stage. The war had not long been over. Democrats, he being one, were fighting to capture everything. The James boys were turned highwaymen and their names were associated with the contemporaneous history of the state. They lowered its level and defied capture. Missouri had had one governor who confessed inability to cope with the situation. Probably profiting by his experience in the war, Governor Crittenden made overtures to Bob Ford, a member of the James gang, and through that means encompassed the destruction of the band. Ford killed Jesse, and Frank, the second brother, surrendered. What in other states would have meant a feud for a generation was dismissed by the clever work of Governor Crittenden as soon as it was over.

No one was forgotten by Governor Crittenden. Had Dickens known him he would have gone into literature with other notable characters. As early as 1870 there was a man came to Kansas City to make some political speeches for the governor. Two years ago that man's dead body was found in squalor. The first hand to get into a purse to buy a grave and a casket was the hand of the old governor. He got not a little of his pleasure out of his personal acts of charity to his personal acquaintances.

It was a pleasure to know the old governor. He was always affable and sunny. He was comforting in sorrow and refreshing always. In his long life he was always busy, and yet he did no great things. He was a monument to the man who has not done great things in that he showed how really much an ordinary man can do with credit to himself and yet keep within the orbit of the ordinary man.

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May 29, 1909

PIONEER CONDUCTOR DIES.

A. B. Shepherd Ran Out of Topeka
in 1870 on Santa Fe.

A. B. Shepherd, one of the three conductors who were with the Santa Fe railroad when it started out of Topeka in 1870, and one of the oldest passenger conductors working out of the Union depot, died yesterday morning at his home, 1216 Washington street, at the age of 67 years. For several years Mr. Shepherd has had a night run on the Missouri Pacific line from Kansas City to Coffeyville, Kas.

Born and reared in Wellsville, O., Mr. Shepherd enlisted in the One Hundred and First Ohio volunteers at the outbreak of the civil war. At its close he was discharged with the rank of sergeant. Immediately he became a brakeman on the Cleveland & Pittsburg railway and had been in the railway business since, working out of Kansas City for thirty years.

Mr. Shepherd was a member of the Order of Railway Conductors. A widow and two sons, Charles, who lives in Armourdale, and Wilbur B., who lives at the Washington street address, survive.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home. Rev. Dr. George Reynolds, pastor of the Second Presbyterian church, will officiate. Burial will be in Forest Hill cemetery.

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May 28, 1909

GOVERNOR CRITTENDEN
STRICKEN BY APOPLEXY.

FALLS FROM SEAT WHILE
WATCHING BALL GAME.

Age and General Ill Health Believed
by Doctors to Render Recovery
Problematical -- Has Not Re-
gained Consciousness.

As the result of a stroke of apoplexy which came upon him yesterday afternoon while watching a baseball game at Association park, former Governor Thomas T. Crittenden is lying at the point of death at his home, 3220 Flora avenue, with physicians in constant attendance.

Slight hope is entertained for Mr. Crittenden's recovery. His age and general ill health are said to be factors against his rallying. Though Mr. Crittenden had not regained consciousness up to a late hour last night, it was ascertained by the attending physicians, Ned O. Lewis and J. C. Rogers, that Mr. Crittenden's entire left side is completely paralyzed. The left side of his face is badly bruised where he struck the benches in front of him when he fell forward at the ball park.

Mr. Crittenden had been sitting in the grandstand near the third base line during the first of the two games which were played between Kansas City and St. Paul. Other spectators who were sitting near him said that he had not displayed any unusual excitement over the game and had been sitting rather quietly.

It was the beginning of the second inning of the second game when Mr. Crittenden was seen suddenly to fall forward and outward into the aisle.

CONDITION IS CRITICAL.

Thinking that Mr. Crittenden had but fainted, his immediate neighbors rushed to pick him up and placed him on the bench, where they attempted to revive him. Dr. Stanley Newhouse, the park physician, was hastily called from the press box, where he had been watching the game. He gave Mr. Crittenden prompt attention, but was unable to revive him.

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., was summoned from the city hall. He was driven to the park in an automobile, and suggested that he drive his father home in the motor car. Dr. Newhouse advised an ambulance, and one from the Walnut street police station was summoned. Then Mr. Crittenden was taken to his home.

After a long consultation with Dr. Lewis and an examination of Mr. Crittenden, Dr. Rogers stated that while the patient was in a precarious condition and that he was critically ill, there was a little hope for his recovery.

"It all depends upon the size of the hemorrhage on the brain," said Dr. Rogers. "It appears that the hemorrhage is from a ruptured small blood vessel, but we do not know whether or not the flow had been stopped completely. Governor Crittenden has been in poor health for several months. That taken into consideration with the fact that this is the second attack, does not argue well for a speedy recovery."

Dr. Newhouse, who first attended Mr. Crittenden, is not so sanguine as Dr. Rogers. Dr. Lewis remained with his patient all night, and did not make a statement.

HIS SECOND SEIZURE.

Eighteen years ago, while Mr. Crittenden was a practicing lawyer, he had his first stroke of apoplexy. No ill effects resulted from the first stroke, other than to make him more susceptible to the second.

Mr. Crittenden has long been a baseball enthusiast and there have been few games this season, according to his son, that he has missed. It has been his chief recreation, and though his family feared for him to go alone to the games on account of his age and declining health, Mr. Crittenden persisted in doing so. Mayor Crittenden said last night that his family had feared some untoward incident as a probable result of his innocent recreation.

Dr. Newhouse stated last night that he believed the attack was caused from an overwrought nervous condition. He said that it occurred at a lull in the game and excitement, and was the result of a reaction upon the nerves, even though Mr. Crittenden had not appeared excited.

Mr. Crittenden in 77 years of age. He was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky. His father was Henry Crittenden, a farmer, and the former governor was one of eight children. He received his education at Center college, Danville, Ky. Among his classmates were Judge John F. Philips of this city, who was by his bedside last night; W. P. C. Breckenridge, John Young Brown, and other noted men.

LAWYER AND SOLDIER.

Mr. Crittenden studied law at Frankfort. Soon after his marriage to Miss Carrie W. Jackson he moved to Lexington, Mo., where he first practiced law. There he remained until the civil war when he and Judge Philips raised a regiment of federal sondiers, and were engaged in the war for three years. Many of his battles were fought in Jackson county.

At the close of the war Mr. Crittenden formed a partnership with Francis M. Cockrell, afterward United States senator. During that time Mr. Crittenden was sent to congress from Missouri.

In 1878 Mr. Crittenden became governor of Missouri, and the four years of his administration were stormy ones. At the close of his term he moved to Kansas city, where, with the exception of four years, he has resided since. That exception is during the time he acted as consul general to Mexico under President Cleveland.

Mr. Crittenden has three sons, H. H., Mayor Thomas T., both of Kansas City, and William J. Crittenden of Pittsburg, Pa., now in Japan.

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May 11, 1909

OLD SOLDIER OF 65
WINS YOUTHFUL BRIDE.

HIS PROPOSAL FOLLOWED SOON
AFTER FIRST MEETING.

"My Reasons for Marrying Are Not
for Publication," Said Veteran
Porter's Young Wife -- Plan
a Fine Honeymoon.

CARRIE CLEMENTS.
27-Year-Old Bride of 67-Year-Old Civil War Veteran.

December and June were mated last night at the Hotel Moore, Ninth and Central streets, when Henry C. Porter, 65 years old, was married to Miss Carrie Clements, 27 years of age. Porter, who lost his right leg at the battle of Gettysburg, supported himself on his crutches and took the hand of his diminutive bride in his while she promised to "love, honor and obey him until death did them part."

In celebration of the occasion the old soldier wore a "boiled shirt" with a stiff collar and necktie, for the first time in thirty years.

"I've been too busy out in Colorado and New Mexico to wear city clothes," he said. "But when a man marries there are a good many changes that come into his life and it isn't too much to ask him to wear these things then."

"Ours was a short courtship but a stirring one," continued Porter, his blue eyes twinkling. "I had seen her long before I made her acquaintance and was struck by her daintiness and prettiness. I made up my mind to win her. We boarded at the same house in Pueblo and two months ago I proposed and she accepted me. It's just like other love stories except that I was in a hurry and she couldn't resist me."

BRIDE A NEW YORKER.

Miss Clements is a brunette, four feet five inches tall. She was born in Caldwell, Warren county, N. Y., and her parents and only sister live there yet. Three years ago she went to Pueblo, and was employed in a department store when the veteran met her.

"Why should a young woman like you marry an old man like Mr. Porter?" she was asked.

"That is the only question I will not answer," she replied. "I have my reasons, but they are not for publication."

Henry C. Porter enlisted in the Ninety-fifth New York volunteers at the outbreak of the civil war. He was in many battles and was orderly to General Reynolds at the battle of Gettysburg. He was a few feet behind that general when he was killed, and the next day was mowed down himself in the charge on Missionary Ridge. For several months he lay in the hospital with a lame leg, and afterwards joined a Nebraska cavalry regiment.

After the surrender at Appomatox, and the review of the troops at Washington, he found time to have his leg amputated, and then started to earn his living by his trade as a miller. He had learned this business at the age of 14 years, and at the time of his retirement several years ago had worked at it for forty years.

GROOM IS WELL-TO-DO.

Porter moved to Colorado twenty-two years ago, and has worked in Denver, Leadville, Telluride, Cripple Creek, Pueblo and Albequerque, N. M. After his retirement he lived comfortably on his pension and the income from his property. He is fairly well-to-do.

The honeymoon trip which the oddly assorted pair will take is one to be envied. Miss Clements left Pueblo for this city several days ago and took rooms at the Buck hotel. Yesterday Mr. Porter arrived, and they were married last night. Today or tomorrow they will leave for St. Louis, and after resting a few days, proceed to Chicago. Thence they will travel by easy stages to Washington. Their next stopping place will be Baltimore, and they will take ship for San Francisco at New York. Later they will make a trip through Yellowstone Park, and will then go back to Pueblo or Denver, and begin housekeeping.

"I want to be back home in time to attend the national G. A. R. convention which will be held in Salt Lake City September 7," said the soldier, saluting and marching away in a brand new pair of crutches bought for the glad occasion.

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April 23, 1909

CROSSED THE PLAINS
TOGETHER IN 1858.

FORMER COMRADES MEET FOR
FIRST TIME SINCE.

George W. Friend and Ferd Smith
Fought on Opposite Sides in War
and Both Were in Battle
of Lexington.

Curiosity on the part of a young man who desired to witness the meeting of two old soldiers of the same war, but who fought under different flags, last night brought together two men who crossed the plains in company in 1858, but who had not heard of each other since. George W. Friend of Anderson, Mo., and Ferd Smith of 3339 Morrill avenue were the principals in the meeting.

It was in 1858 that the men joined the same train of freighters from Kansas City to Fort Union, N. M., and drove teams of oxen and fought Indians on the plains for ninety days. On the return of the freighters to Kansas City they were disbanded and them men went back to their farms. They lost track of each other until last night.

MEET AT HOSPITAL.

An operation being necessary to save the life of his son, George W. Friend came to Kansas City several days ago and took his son to Wesley hospital. About the same time a nephew of Ferd Smith became ill and went to the hospital. The nephew met Mr. Friend and last night when his uncle called to see him the nephew introduced the old men.

"Smith, Smith. You are not the Smith from Lafayette county, are you?" Mr. Friend asked.

"Yes, I joined the Confederate army at Lexington," Smith replied.

"A man named Smith crossed the plains with me in '58," Friend remarked.

"That's me," Ex-Freighter Smith answered.

"What, are you 'Pudd' Smith?" Friend asked, and when he was told that the old soldier was the same man who crossed the plains with him, he led the way to two chairs on the veranda where there was a great talk-fest.

During the conversation the friends discovered that they were both engaged in the battle at Lexington,, one fighting for the Confederacy and the other on the side of the Union.

TRIED TO KILL EACH OTHER.

"I did my best to kill you, Friend," Smith informed his friend.

"Same here, Pete," was the rejoinder made by Friend.

The old soldiers have arranged to see each other every day while Friend is in town. The first t rip across the plains made by Friend was for Anderson & Hays of Westport, in 1857, and he freighted to Fort Union. Thereafter he crossed the plains twelve times, most of his trips being to Fort Union, although he made one to Santa Fe and another to Denver.

Mr. Friend is 71 years old and his friend of the plains is 72 years old.

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