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January 21, 1910

BOY SUSPECTS GIVEN
FREEDOM.

NO EVIDENCE FOUND AGAINST
LOUIS DYE, RALPH CLYNE
AND HARRY SHAY.

Those Filing Charges and
Making Identifications
Fail to Appear.

Three boys, Louis Dye, Ralph Clyne and Harry M. Shay, accused of highway robbery, were dismissed from the charge by Justice James B. Shoemaker yesterday afternoon, completely vindicated. His action, Justice Shoemaker said afterwards, was warranted by the fact that they had not been sufficiently identified as the robbers, that their good character was obvious and that there was a want of prosecution, none of the the complaining witnesses nor any of the numerous persons alleged to have been robbed being present in the court room when the case was called.

A chance resemblance alleged to exist between the innocent youths and the boy bandits who committed innumerable depredations, including a murder, a month and a half ago, has followed the former since their apprehension in the Peck dry goods store December 7. Interrogated by police and county prosecutors, and an attempt made to personally assault one of them in the office of Captain Walter Whitsett at Central station by Thomas Spangler, whose father was killed by robbers in his saloon at Twentieth street and Grand avenue, the boys have had an unenviable six weeks.

Although Clyne, Dye and Shay worked in the same store in the capacity of elevator operators, they were scarcely acquainted before their arrest. They met often in the course of a day's work but it was only as other employes of a large commercial institution that hires hundreds of people meet. Now they are friends. Adversity and a common cause have brought them together.

The boys were arrested at the Peck store, at the insistence of Miss Stella Sweet, 529 Brooklyn avenue, and Mrs. L. F. Flaugh, 629 Brooklyn avenue, at 5:30 o'clock, December 7. Captain Walter Whitsett and Patrolmen E. M. Smith and E. L. Masson were the arresting officers.

While getting on the elevator to shop on the third floor the women, both of whom had been held up and robbed a week before, said they thought Clyne and Shay were trying to conceal their faces from them.

In the office of Captain Whitsett, the next day, the several persons previously robbed by the boy bandits were allowed to examine the boys in the presence of Captain Whitsett, Thomas R. Marks and Thomas Higgs, deputy county prosecutor. They were: Joseph Shannon, Miss Sweet, Mrs. Flaugh, W. S. McCain, Edward Smith, Albert Ackerman, Thomas Spangler and Edward McCreary.

When the case was called for trial before Justice Shoemaker yesterday afternoon Smith was out of town. He had left an assurance that he positively would not swear that the boys were guilty of robbing him. McCreary was not at the trial when his name was called, and it had reached the ears of the court likewise that he would not, under oath, associate the boys with the crime he had formerly charged against them.

Assistant Prosecutor Higgs asked for a continuance of the case until he could procure further evidence, but this was overruled. the boys were dismissed for want of prosecution.

"The police and the county had no case against them," said Justice Shoemaker. "This is another instance of someone acting prematurely. From all evidence to the contrary, these young men are as guiltless as anyone here in the courtroom."

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January 13, 1910

SOLDIER DICK AND
GIRL ARE PARTED.

"WAIT 'TIL I'M 21" HE SAYS,
"I'LL BE TRUE," GIVES
CHESSIE.

"Mooning" Around Third
and Main When Arrested
by Policeman.
Parted Sweethearts Chessie Nave and Richard Wiliford.
CHESSIE NAVE AND RICHARD WILIFORD.

Chessie Nave is 16, and Richard Wiliford is 20, but they each felt a great deal older and more responsible than when they arrived in Kansas City yesterday morning on an early train, with a wish and a determination to get married. they didn't feel so old nor so responsible last night. This is the way of it:

Last Tuesday the young people ran away together from Lexington, Mo., where the young man is a student in Wentworth Military academy. The girl is just a girl. they were accompanied on their matrimonial excursion by two friends, Grace Nave, a cousin of Miss Chessie, and Calvin Cook of Bartlesville, also a student in the military academy. The plan of the eloping kittens was to get a marriage license in Kansas City, Kas., where officials dealing in Cupid's paper are generally supposed to be gentle and kind. They missed the direction and went "mooning around the vicinity of Third and Main streets at an early hour yesterday morning. There a policeman found them.

The police had been notified that the young people were headed toward Kansas City with some kind of a prank in veiw, and the policeman saw them and happened to remember. He nailed them.
HIS FATHER ARRIVES.

Joel Wiliford, Woodford, Ok., father of Richard, had also been notified of his son's unceremonious leave in company with a little girl in skirts. The old gentleman hopped a train and got to Kansas City about as soon as the elopers. He dropped into central police station about the time that Richard and Chessie, Grace and Calvin were making a botch of trying to argue the police into the belief that while the resemblance was probably great, it was not absolute.

Papa Wiliford tried moral persuasion on his son. Nothing doing. Son was obdurate. What's the use of trying to make a soldier of a fellow, anyway, if you expect him to give up his girl at a mere parental command Richard said a soldier should never surrender. And he further declared he wouldn't. So into the dungeon cell went he, like any real, spicy, belted and buckled Don Juan of old. His good friend Calvin went along with him, but not from choice.

As for the girls, they saw life as it is from the matron's room Thus stood the matter all day. Richard would not desert the principles of academic soldiering, and Chessie vowed she would be as true as "Beautiful Bessie, the Banana Girl, or, "He Kissed Me Once and I Can't Forget." Then came Nash Ruby, brother-in-law of Chessie. He came From Lexington. He looked real fierce.

HERDED BEFORE CAPTAIN.

Forth from the dungeon cell marched Soldier Richard, and friend Calvin. Down from the matron's melancholy boudoir minced Chessie and Grace. They were herded into the office of Captain Walter Whitsett, where more moral suasion was rubbed on.

Richard, during the afternoon, had agreed with his father upon a compromise, bu which he was to return to school and finish his education. Later he took it all back. And w hen he saw Chessie he said:

"I'm going to marry you, Chessie, even if I never become a great general."

"That's where you're wrong," mildly said Papa Wiliford.

Then Chessie put in her word. But it didn't move anybody at all. Unless it was Nash Ruby, Brother-in-Law Nash. "You'll come along home with me, miss," said he. Chessie subsided. But when it came to parting, Richard uttered his defiance. "I'll be 21 before long," said he, "and then we can marry."

"I'll be true to you," sobbed Chessie.

Brother-in-law Nash led her away to catch a train for Lexington. this morning Richard will go to Woodford, Ok., with pa. Friend Calvin went home last night. That's all, except it is said Chessie made a face at her future father-in-law.

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January 11, 1910

HELD AS SUSPECTS
IN HEIRESS CASE.

KANSAS CITY POLICE THOUGHT
THEY HAD FOUND MISS-
ING COUPLE.

Arrested as They Disem-
barked From Train From
Excelsior Springs.
Marie  Horton, Suspected of Being Henrietta Von Etten.
MARIE HORTON, ALIAS HENRIETTA VON ETTEN.
Reed's Companion and for a While Believed to Be Roberta De Janon.

While the Kansas City police were arresting a man and a woman suspected of being Ferdinand Cohen and Roberta De Janon, respectively waiter and heiress, ho eloped from Philadelphia more than one week ago, the real Cohen and De Janon were being taken into custody in Chicago.

The Kansas City suspects were arrested by plain clothes officers from Central station as they alighted from a train from Excelsior Springs at the Union depot yesterday afternoon. Information leading to the arrest was given to Captain Walter Whitsett of the Central police district by R. E. Mackey of the Pickwick apartments at Excelsior Springs by long distance telephone. Patrtolmen John Torpey and T. H. Gillespie were awaiting them at the depot.

They were taken to police headquarters and examined by Captain Walter Whitsett. The man gave his name as H. J. Reed, and address as Chicago. He said he had been for some time in the gas fixture business with offices in the Holland building in that city. On his person was found $1,200 in currency, and letters addressed to H. J. Reed and H. J. Ross. He said he was not married to the woman in whose company he was arrested. He said he had known her for eight years. He refused to make any other statement.

H. J. Reed, of Chicago or Salt Lake City.
H. J. REED.
Arrested Under Suspicion That He Might Be Ferdinand Cohen.

Men from the Pinkerton detective agency who have been working on the De Janon elopement case declare that Reed resembles the missing waiter, Ferdinand Cohen, in almost every respect, and asked that he be held until information could be secured from their Philadelphia office.

WOMAN TALKED FREELY.

Reed's companion, although visibly worried over the fact that she was detained, was willing to talk. She said she was Marie Horton of Detroit, Mick., but after cross-questioning declared taht her real name is Henriette von Etten. According to her story she was born in Vienna, Austria, and was married in that country to a man who was at one time connected with the foreign embassy at Washington, D. C. She left her husband and went to the Pacific coast eight years ago, where she met Reed, who, she stated, was at that time conducting a place in Seattle, Wash. She says Reed is suing his Seattle wife for divorce. In March, 1909, she went to Detroit, where she conducted a rooming house. She came to Kansas City two weeks ago and met Reed. They lived in a hotel on Baltimore avenue until they went to Excelsior Springs. They intended going on to Salt Lake City.

Two big trunks, a dress suit case, a valise and a handbag were brought from the baggage room at the Union depot by the police officers. The contents were emptied and examined, but no further indenifying evidence was obtained.

Pinkerton men and the police were soon convinced the woman is not Roberta De Janon. The eloping girl is only 17 years old, while the woman at present in custody appears to be 25. Marie Horton has several false teeth, while Miss De Janon has none.

SHORT STAY IN EXCELSIOR.

The man and woman had spent Thursday night at the Elms hotel. They registered as H. J. Reed and wife of Chicago, and rented rooms Friday in the Pickwick apartments, saying they would remain a month. They kept close to their room during their stay. Considerable wine was delivered to the rooms. The woman was in Kansas City Saturday.

They gave no reason for leaving here hurriedly. When asked by another guests of the apartments to show credentials as to who he was the man exhibted papers from Salt Lake City and Tacoma, Wash., but had nothing to show he was from Chicago.

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December 15, 1909

ONE WIFE AT HOME,
ANOTHER AT HOTEL?

WED NO. 1 27 YEARS AGO; NO. 2
DEC. 7, 1909, THE CHARGE.

Prosecutor and Police Say Benjamin
Franklin Hughes, Held for In-
vestigation, Admits It --
Wife No. 2's Story.
Benjamin F. Hughes, Alleged Bigamist.
BENJAMIN F. HUGHES.
(From a sketch at police headquarters last night.)

That he married one woman, with whom he makes his home, twenty-seven years ago, and another, who, until Sunday lived as his wife at the Hotel Kupper, on December 7, 1909, is said by Captain Walter Whitsett of the police department and Norman Woodson, an assistant prosecuting attorney, to have been admitted by Benjamin Franklin Hughes, 124 North Hardesty avenue, in a statement secured from him in the matron's room at police headquarters last night.

Hughes was arrested yesterday on complaint of Valerie W. Wiler, who lives with her mother, Mrs. Cora Westover, and her sister, Clarice Wiler, at 1622 Madison street. To Lieutenant Robert Smith at police headquarters Miss Wiler represented that she had been married to Hughes, who has a wife and family at the Hardesty avenue address, by Probate Judge Van B. Prather in Kansas City, Kas. The ceremony, she said, was performed Tuesday, December 7.

Miss Wiler was under the impression that Hughes had left the city when she notified the police. It was later determined that he was home with Mrs. Hughes. Officer Oliver A. Linsay made the arrest. The man was held in the matron's room last night and will remain there until an investigation is made of the charges against him at 9 o'clock this morning.

HAS THREE CHILDREN.

Benjamin Hughes is 52 years old, and has lived in Kansas City two years, coming here, Mrs. Hughes said last night, from Glasgow, Mo. He is said to come of an excellent family and has dabbled in politics.

The details of Hughes's statement were not given out last night. It was announced by the prosecutor and Captain Whitsett, however, that he broke down and admitted marrying the Wiler woman in Kansas City, Kas., Tuesday a week ago, giving as his reason that pressure had been brought to bear upon him to unite with the girl.

According to the statement he was married to Mrs. Hughes in Osborn, Mo., April 16, 1882. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. James E. Hughes, pastor of the Baptist church there. Three children, two boys and a girl, were born to them. The oldest son, aged 20, is a clerk in the First National bank. The other son is 16 years old, the girl 11. Few clouds, he declared, darkened his married life until he met the Wiler woman last April. Mrs. Hughes had been congenial, a good, Christian woman whom all respected.

STORY OF NO. 2.

Valerie Wiler last night said she had first met Hughes when she was in the inmate of a home ofr girls at Chillicothe, Mo., under the care of Mrs. E. Carter. She believed the man was a state officer inspecting such public institutions. he seemed to like her at first sight, and came to see her often. Finally he induced her to become his wife.

Leaving Chillicothe, she stated, they went directly to Kansas City, Kas., where she gave her age as 17 years, while Hughes gave his as 45. She produced a certificate on which both names were signed together with that of Judge Van Prather who officiated at the wedding.

After the marriage, she said, the went to the Hotel Kupper where her supposed husband registered ans Frank Hughes and wife. They stayed at the Kupper several days.

"I discovered my mistake last Sunday morning when I was visiting my mother," said Miss Wiler. "She was aware of the attentions paid me by Mr. Hughes and told me that he had a wife and family on Hardesty avenue. I decided to find out if he had deceived me at once.

"Mother, my sister Clarice and I went to the Hughes home about 6 o'clock Sunday evening. We were allowed to enter unannounced, and found the man whom I had supposed to be my husband there surrounded by his family. He was very much frightened, got up quickly, and asked if he could see me alone for a few minutes. I would not listen. It did not take me very long to tell him that what I had to say was to be to his wife as well as to him.

BEGS NO. 1's FORGIVENESS.

"I said to Mrs. Hughes: 'Madame, I have married this man and have the certificate to prove it. We were married last Tuesday.' Then I threw myself at her feet and begged her forgiveness, telling her it was not my fault, that i knew nothing of any former marriage when I allowed him to lead me into matrimony. She forgave me then and told her husband that he was worse than I was. Later she seemed to take it all back, and when I went again to the ho use with my mother and sister tonight she treated me coldly. She even ordered me out of the house. I guess she is a perfect Christian woman. Anyway I loved her at first sight, and feel deeply sorry for her.

When Hughes was courting me he offered me many inducements to become his wife. He said he had been a member of the legislature and owned property in town and a farm near Cameron, Mo., worth in all about$75,000. He admitted that he had been married once, but added that his wife died eight years ago. 'I never loved her as I love you and we will be a very happy couple if you will have me,' he said once.

MRS. HUGHES DISCONSOLATE.

"Sunday night when we confronted him before his wife in his own home, he asked to speak with me aside. I refused, and he seemed very much annoyed. Finally he managed to get close enough to my ear to whisper, 'If you will make up with me, honey, we will get out of this town and go to Mexico.' I do not remember replying. The way he treated his wife did not suit me, although he was kindness itself to me from the first."

At the Hughes home last night Mrs. Hughes would not be interviewed about her husband. She was nearly distracted over his arrest, she said. Occasionally as she spoke she hesitated, wrung her ands and repeated passages from the Bible.

"This woman he married is a very wicked woman," she cried out once. "She drew my husband way to her through her evil ways. Lord have mercy on them both and me. My poor children."

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December 8, 1909

BOYS IDENTIFIED AS
SPANGLER'S SLAYERS.

ROBBERS' VICTIMS RECOGNIZE
TRIO, ONE A BRIDEGROOM.

Elevator Operators, Ages 17, 19 and
21, in Downtown Dry Goods
Store, Are Arrested -- Youngest
Weeps, Others Indifferent.
Louis Dye, Ralph Clyne and Harry Shay, Suspects in the Spangler Murder.
LOUIS M. DYE, RALPH A. CLYNE AND HARRY SHAY,
Three Suspects Held by Police for Spangler Murder and Recent Holdups.
(Sketched at Police Headquarters Last Night.)

Working on the "boy bandit" theory, the police yesterday evening arrested three youths, two of whom were identified as having shot and killed M. A. Spangler and wounded Sam Spangler, his son, in their saloon at Twentieth street and Grand avenue on the morning of November 23. Their names are Louis Dye, 21 years old; Ralph Clyne, 19, and Harry Shay, 17. All are employed as elevator operators in a down town dry goods store. Dye is a bridegroom.

The arrest was made at 5:30 o'clock by Captain Walter Whitsett and Plain Clothes Officers E. M. Smith and E. L. Maston.

VICTIMS VISIT STORE.

The officers visited the store in company with several recent victims of holdups and rode in the elevators with the boys as they were at work. They were arrested and taken to police headquarters. Albert Ackerman, 502 1/2 Wyandotte street, the man who was in the Spangler saloon at the time of the shooting, was summoned and in Captain Whitsett's office identified Dye and Clyne as the two who shot up the saloon.

"That's the fellow that had the gun," Ackerman stated, pointing at Dye. "The other fellow was with him. Of course they are dressed differently now, but there is no mistaking their faces."

Four others who have been robbed recently visited police headquarters in the evening and in every case identified the boys.

DRUGGIST IDENTIFIES.

W. S. McCann, a druggist, living at 1405 East Tenth street, identified Dye and Clyne as the two men who attempted to rob his store at Twenty-seventh street and Agnes avenue on the night of November 25. He said they went in the store, and that Clyne pointed a revolver at his head while Dye attempted to rob the cash register. When he showed fight they fired four shots at him and ran. He thinks that Harry Shay is the man that was left outside as a look out.

Miss Stella Sweet, 529 Brooklyn avenue, and Mrs. C. L. Flaugh, 629 Brooklyn avenue, who were held up Thanksgiving night on the steps of the Admiral Boulevard Congregational church, identified all three of the boys as the robbers.

Edward C. Smith of the Smith-McCord-Townsend Dry Goods Company declared that the three boys had robbed him on Thirty-sixth street, between Locust and Cherry streets, on the night of December 3. They took a pocket book containing a Country Club bond for $100. At that time they had handkerchiefs tied over their faces, but Smith was sure that he recognized them.

SPANGLER TO SEE TRIO.

Captain Whitsett made no attempt to cross-examine the boys last night, but ordered them locked up until this morning when they will be confronted by further witnesses, the chief of whom will be Sam Spangler, who was discharged from the general hospital yesterday. The prosecutor's office was notified and representatives will be on hand today to take their statements.

"I am sure that we have got the right men this time," stated Captain Whitsett. "They answer the description of the gang that have been doing all the robbing lately, and I am sure that it was they that held up Joseph B. Shannon last week."

None of the boys would make any statement except that they were strangers in town, only having been working for a week. During the identification process both Dye and Clyne showed indifference, while the younger boy, Shay, broke down and cried.

Dye lives at 1921 Oakland, Shay at 1242 Broadway and Clyne at 1710 East Thirteenth street. Dye was married three weeks ago, shortly before the Spangler murder.

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December 3, 1909

CALLED ON THE POLICE TO
ARBITRATE LOVE AFFAIR.

John Kenyon of McLouth, Kas.,
Wasn't Sure of His Ground, So
Asked Advice.

Meets an Unromantic Police Sergeant.

The intervention of the police spoiled a runaway marriage yesterday. John Kenyon, a farmer of McLouth, Kas., 84 years old, walked into police headquarters yesterday morning and, producing a letter from his fiancee, Mrs. Ada Cross of Frankfort, Ind., sought the advice of Chief of Police Frank Snow as to his matrimonial affairs. The chief refused to arbitrate and advised John to return to the farm.

Kenyon left headquarters, but a few hours later returned and this time called on the desk sergeant to referee. The sergeant, a big unromantic man, thought that Kenyon was a fit charge for the police matron and after depositing his valuables, some $20 in cash and a bank book showing a healthy balance, in the office safe, Kenyon was escorted upstairs.

Kenyon went to bed, but was not permitted to rest long in peace. Mrs. Ada Cross, in company with several real estate dealers, soon appeared on the scene. They wished to pay the old man a visit and informed Captain Whitsett that Kenyon was negotiation for the purpose of a rooming house on Twelfth street opposite the Hotel Washington. The captain then took a hand in the administration of the old man's finances. Mrs. Cross, on being questioned, admitted that she was engaged to be married to Kenyon and that he had promised to indorse her note for $2,500 for the purchase of the property. She stated that if it had not been for the intervention of Walter Kenyon, the old man's son, who made a trip from McLouth for the purpose of breaking up the marriage, the couple would have appeared before a justice of the peace Sunday.

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November 22, 1909

WOUNDED MAN WON'T
TELL WHO SHOT HIM.

HARRY BONNELL MAY CARRY
HIS SECRET TO DEATH.

Revolver Found in Room of Former
Wild West Show Rider; Wom-
an May Prove an Impor-
tant Witness.
Harvey Bonnell, Rooming House Shooting Victim.
HARVEY BONNELL.

Lying on the floor in a dingy rooming house at 509 East Sixth street, with a bullet wound in his breast, Harvey Bonnell was found yesterday afternoon.

Although he knew that he was in a dangerous condition, Bonnell refused to tell how he received the wound. At the general hospital, where he was rushed in the police ambulance, he refused to talk to Norman Woodson, an assistant prosecuting attorney, who attempted to get a dying statement.

"I'm not going to tell how it happened," he declared. "Perhaps I'll die, but I'm not going to give anyone away."

He then turned over and then refused to utter another word.

When the police arrived at the scene Sadie Gear, proprietress of the rooming house, was seen going upstairs. She was agitated and declared that she was not in the room at the time. At police headquarters she maintained the story.

Sergeant Robert Smith sent several officers to the building, where everyone was questioned closely. Mrs. Gear was brought to the station with several roomers.

Patrolman Gurney Shaw, after a long search, found the pistol in a room on the third floor, which was occupied by Lee Rarick, formerly a rough rider with Miller Bros.' Wild West show.


ADMITS HEARING SHOT.

Though Rarick denied at first that he knew anything about the affair, he admitted that he heard a shot, and a few minutes later, Harry Gordon, one of the roomers, had brought the revolver to his room.

Mrs. Sadie Gear.
SADIE GEAR,
Considered an Important Witness by Police.

"I loaned it to Mrs. Gear a week ago," he said. "because I didn't want to keep it up here in my room. I'm sure I don't know who did it.

Gordon would make no statement to the police. Mrs. Gear was in a defiant mood when she faced Captain Whitsett. She asserted that she had frequently quarreled with Bonnell, who abused her.

"But I don't know a thing about the shooting today," she declared, "I got up for a moment and went out and then I heard the shooting. I went upstairs, and then they told me that Bonnell had been shot. Yes, that's the same revolver that was given me to keep by one of my roomers."

Captain Whitsett asserted last night that he expected the mystery would be cleared up quickly.

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November 21, 1909

BOY JUMPS OFF CAR;
KILLED BY AUTO.

NOT THE HOPPING KIND, JUST
PLAYING, COMPANION SAYS.

Edgar Palin, Aged 12, Dies in Hos-
pital From Injuries Received in
Alighting in Path of Machine
Giving Children Ride.
Edgar Palin, 12-year-old Killed by Automobile.
EDGAR PALIN,
Twelve-Year-Old Boy Who Leaped from Street Car Fender and Was Mortally Injured by Automobile.

As Edgar Palin, 12 years old, 2802 East Sixth street, jumped from the back fender of an eastbound Independence avenue car yesterday afternoon at Prospect avenue, he was run over and fatally injured by a motor car driven by E. T. Curtis, 3338 Wyandotte street. He died at 7 o'clock last night at the German hospital, without recovering consciousness.

With Allen Compton, 400 Wabash avenue, the boy had been playing all afternoon. About 3 o'clock the two lads started northward on Wabash avenue, and at Independence avenue both noticed an approaching street car.

"Let's catch the fender," called Edgar, as he waited along the curbing. The car was moving at moderate speed and the boy ran behind, and caught hold of the fender. His companion, 10 years old, ran behind on the sidewalk. At Prospect avenue Edgar, without looking around, jumped from the fender directly in front of an approaching auto, barely fifteen feet behind him. Curtis attempted to dodge the boy. The left fender of the auto struck the child and he was sent tumbling on the pavement. He was picked up by Curtis. Several children were in the auto. With Curtis was Herman Smith, of 3606 Olive street, whose father owned the car. In a nearby drug store it was found the boy had been injured seriously.

GIVING CHILDREN RIDE.

"I was driving at about fifteen miles an hour," Curtis said. "The auto belonged to young Smith's father and I was running it because I had the most experience. A party of school children were with us. We were taking them for a ride around the block. I noticed the child on the fender and did not have the least idea that he was going to run in my path. I swerved to one side, but the machine skidded and the fender of the auto struck him in the back. I realized at once that he had received a fearful blow."

After the child was given emergency treatment in the drug store by two neighboring physicians, he was taken to his home in the motor car, and after being attended by Dr. Max Goldman, was removed to the German hospital. Dr. Goldman found that the boy's spine was broken and that his skull was probably fractured.

Allen Compton, his playmate, was in a condition bordering on hysterics last night. The two had been gathering old papers during the forenoon and had just been to the paper mill, where they had received a few pennies with which they intended to buy Christmas presents.

"Edgar wasn't no car hopper," Allen said last night, in defense of his friend. "He was just running behind and holding on to the fender. Edgar wasn't that kind."

With Judge J. E. Guinotte, a friend of the family, young Curtis went to police headquarters last night and made a statement to Captain Walter Whitsett. After consulting Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, it was decided not to hold him. He promised to come to the prosecutor's office Monday and make a complete statement. He said that he had been running a car for eight years. He is the son of W. E. Curtis, a live stock commission man.

The injured boy was the son of W. M. Palin, a real estate dealer in the Commerce building. The body will be taken to Gridley, Kas., for burial.

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September 28, 1909

SHOT A NEIGHBOR, THEN
ACTED GOOD SAMARITAN.

German Woman Gardner Attempted
to Frighten Victor Marten With
Gun That Wasn't Loaded.
Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, Who Shot Gardener.
MRS. MARY WILSDORF.

After emptying the contents of a shotgun into the left thigh of Victor Marten, a gardener, Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, 46 years old, wife of a gardener at Seventy-seventh street and Walrond avenue, yesterday afternoon got on a Marlborough street car and came to the city and gave herself up to Chief of Police Frank F. Snow.

Before leaving her home she gave the wounded man a glass of water and left him lying on the ground near her house in charge of her husband, Carl Wilsdorf, who was later arrested by Mounted Patrolman E. B. Chiles.

Mrs. Wildorf and Marten are neighbors, each owning a ten acre tract of land.

From the facts elicited from the woman through Dr. George Ringle, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, who acted as interpreter for the police, the shooting followed a quarrel, about Marten's horses getting into the truck garden of the Wilsdorf's.

She said the horses frequently trampled the vegetables. One of them wandered over from the Marten field yesterday to the Wildorf land and was locked up in the barn.

When Marten went to the Wilsdorf house to get his horse he was asked to pay a small amount of money for alleged damages. A dispute arose and Mrs. Wilsdorf said that Marten held aloft a potato digger and threatened to kill her.

She said she then ran into the house and got her husband's shotgun, and returned to the yard. When within five feet of Marten the gun was discharged and the contents of one barrel entered the left thigh of Marten. He fell to the ground and asked for a drink of water which was given to him by Mrs. Wilsdorf.

Her husband told her she had better go to town and give herself up to the police, which advice she took. when she first entered police headquarters she was a little excited, and, not being able to speak good English, was misunderstood. The patrolman she met believed her to say a man shot her in the leg, so he directed her to the Emergency hospital. At the hospital Dr. Ringle took her in charge, and, learning that she was the person who did the shooting, took her back to the police station. She was turned over to Chief Snow.

Mrs. Wilsdorf informed the police that the man was still lying in the yard at her home and needed medical attention. Dr. George Todd, 4638 Troost avenue, attended to the man's injuries. Dr. Todd called an ambulance from Freeman & Marshall's and had the man taken to the University hospital.

The woman told Captain Whitsett that she had never before handled a shotgun and did not know exactly how to use it. The one she got in the house was broken at the breech and as she was running with it toward Marten she was trying to replace it. Suddenly the gun snapped into place and was discharged. She said she really did not think it was loaded, but was only trying to scare Marten. She was locked up in the matron's room.

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September 25, 1909

CATTLEMAN KILLS
PARTER IN HOTEL.

SEXTON BAR TRAGEDY FOL-
LOWS QUARREL OVER RANCH.

Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., Puts
Three Bullets Into Brain of
Edward Hayes of Paw-
huska, Ok.
Eugene Hayes, Kansas Cattleman Accused of Murder.
EUGENE HAYES.
Kansas Cattleman Who Killed Edward
Hayes, His Partner, in the Barroom
of the Sexton Hotel Last Night.

Following a quarrel concerning the affairs of their 40,000 acre ranch in Osage county, Oklahoma, Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., a cattleman reputed to be worth half a million dollars, shot and killed his partner, Edward Hayes of Pawhuksa, Ok., in the bar of the Hotel Sexton at 7:45 o'clock last night.

Edward Hayes was shot three times, almost in the center of the forehead. He died instantly Eugene Hayes, who is held at police headquarters, says he shot in self defense.

The shooting was witnessed by Edward Lewis, and Lewis Weisenbacher, bartenders; Lee Russell, a millionaire cattleman from Ft. Worth and Lee Rogers, a Kansas City real estate dealer who is an ex-cowman.

L. C. Thompson, another Kansas City real estate man and former cattle raiser, was in the crowd, but says he did not see the shooting.

The five men entered the hotel together about 7:30 o'clock last night, and sat around a table in the front end of the saloon. About fifteen minutes later Eugene and Edward Hayes went to a table in the rear and against the wall opposite the bar.

THREE BULLETS INTO BRAIN.

Before dinner was served they began quarrelling about business affairs, but the conversation was not overheard by anyone unless it was Lee Russell, who is said to have been standing near the small table at which the partners were sitting.

Suddenly Eugene Hayes, who was facing north, leaped from his chair and running around the end of the table began firing. The first shot struck Edward Hayes in the forehead. Two more were effective, almost in the same spot.

Edward Hayes fell back in his chair, dead, and Eugene, taken in charge by a friend, walked towards the front door after placing his pistol, an automatic gun, in his hip pocket. As he rounded the glass screen at the end of the bar Patrolman Arthur Kennard arrested him.

Edward Lewis, the bartender who saw the shooting, said Edward Hayes reached towards his hip pocket first. As he did so, Lewis said, Eugene got up and pulled his pistol, and began firing as he stepped toward Edward. Edward Hayes did not succeed in getting his revolver out of his pocket. The coroner removed it, and took charge of it until an inquest is held. It was a Luger rapid fire gun, the magazine holding seven cartridges.

"I BEAT YOU TO IT."

"I beat you to it," the witness declared Eugene Hayes said as he put away his revolver.

Inspector E. P. Boyle sent Detectives Ralph Trueman and Denver D. Mitchell to the hotel as soon as he was informed of the killing. Detectives Keshlear and McGraw followed.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was notified, and after viewing the body had it removed to Stewart's undertaking rooms, where he performed a post mortem.

Immediately after the shooting the hotel management called Dr. A. L. Porter, who lifted the dead man out of the chair and laid him on the floor.

Eugene Hayes was taken to police headquarters by Patrolman Kennard. He gave the patrolman his pistol while on the street car.

When taken before Lieutenant James Morris to be booked for investigation Hayes was recognized by Patrolman "Jack" McCauley, who asked him what he was arrested for.

"Just killed my partner, Ed Hayes, up at the Sexton hotel.

"What for?" asked Lieutenant Morris.

QUARREL OVER RANCH AFFAIRS.

"Well, he was going to kill me if I didn't. I had to do it. That's all."

To Captain Walter Whitsett, and Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, Hayes made no attempt to conceal anything except details of the shooting. He refused to say anything more until he could see John Hayes, former chief of police.

"He's a relative of mine, you know," he kept saying during the conversation. "I'm a ranch owner in Oklahoma," began Hayes. "I'm a pretty well known man, and John Hayes, who was formerly chief of police, is a cousin of mine, and he comes down to the Territory and hunts on my place. This man Ed Hayes is no kin of mine. I simply took him into a partnership wit me and he owes me $5,000. He didn't pay anything into the place.

At police headquarters last night the police took off of Eugene Hayes a diamond ring which is valued at $1,000. Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky took possession of a gold watch, a gold pen, $5.50 in money, and a a revolver taken from Edward Hayes. He wore a Knights of Pythias watch charm.

Ex-Chief John Hayes denied last night that he was any relative of the prisoner. "He is not even distantly related," Hayes said. "I have known him for years and have hunted on his place down in Oklahoma. I don't know why he should claim to be some relative of mine."

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August 13, 1909

JAMES MORAN SHOT
BY JACK O'DONNELL.

POLITICS SAID TO HAVE CAUSED
THE QUARREL.

After Shooting, O'Donnell Disap-
peared, but Later Surrendered
to Police -- Moran Not Dan-
gerously Wounded.

Enmity said to have grown out of a factional fight in the Democratic party in the Second ward last night culminated in a quarrel between Jack O'Donnell, a cigarmaker, who lives at the Century hotel, and James Moran, formerly proprietor of a saloon in the Washington hotel, in which Moran was shot in the neck and painfully injured by O'Donnell. The shooting occurred in the Century hotel about 8:30 o'clock.

Moran with several friends was standing at the bar in the hotel saloon when O'Donnell and Joseph Donnegan, manager of the Century theater, entered the place.

Moran and O'Donnell began quarreling and Harry Friedburg, who was with the Moran party, endeavored to quiet them. He told O'Donnell that there would be trouble if he stayed int he saloon and that it was best that he leave. O'Donnell went into the lobby of the hotel and was followed by Moran, who again started to upbraid O'Donnell. According to witnesses Moran threatened O'Donnell.

BULLET LODGED IN NECK.

"I'll just get you before you have a chance to do anything to me," is the reply credited to O'Donnell, who drew a revolver and fired at Moran, who had turned and was running from the lobby. As Moran dodged into the bargershop from the lobby, O'Donnell, who was following, fired a second and third time. One bullet struck the fleeing man in the back between the shoulders and ranged upwards and to the left, lodgining in the neck. One bullet lodged in the wall and the third went through the door.

Moran ran out of the barger shop and fell on the sidewalk in front. He was carried into the hotel and Dr. J. D. Griffith was summoned. O'Donnell was caught by Friedberg and John Campbell. A police ambulance with Dr. H. T. Morton from the emergency hospital removed the injured man to St. Joseph's hospital. H is wound is not dangerous and he will be out of the hospital in a few days.

COULDN'T LOCATE O'DONNELL.

The police were notified but when they arrived on the scene O'Donnell had disappeared and they were unable to locate him. Inspector of Detectives E. P. Doyle detailed Detectives Kinney and Jennings on the case. After going to the hotel the men went to the hospital to see Moran, who refused to tell anyone who s hot him. The detectives telephoned the inspector that they could not find O'Donnell, but that Joseph Donnegan informed them that O'Donnell would give himself up the first thing int he morning.

Another officer was informed that O'Donnell was in the Century hotel and would give himself up in the morning. His reason for delaying was said to be because Captain Walter Whitsett disliked him and would place him in the holdover without a chance of securing bond. When Captain Whitsett heard that O'Donnell was at the hotel he instructed Lieutenant M. E. Ryan to send Sergeant Robert Greely to arrest him.

FOLLOWED ANOTHER FIGHT.

The quarrel last night followed one in the afternoon during which O'Donnell struck Moran in the mouth and further bruised the ex-saloonkeeper. This fight occurred in Wisman's saloon, Twelfth and Oak streets. Bert Striegel, a deputy constable named Caulfield, Joseph Donnegan and Moran were in the saloon when Jack O'Donnell came in. The men had a drink together and then Moran, it is claimed,, accused O'Donnell of throwing down politically Michael O'Hearn. Other charges were made by Moran and finally, it is said, he called Edward O'Donnell, a policeman and brother of Jack, a name which Jack resented. The men engaged in a fight. Wisman separated them and put the crowd out, as he said he would not allow a fight in his place.

SURRENDERED TO POLICE.

It was midnight before the police could locate O'Donnell and then he voluntarily gave himself up. He rode by himself in a carriage to police headquarters and surrendered to Lieutenant M. E. Ryan. He was not asked about the shooting by the officers in charge and was placed in the matron's room. He did not mention the shooting nor offer any explanation for it.

The trouble between the men, it is alleged, grew out of the fact that O'Donnell and Donnegan were out of the town on the last election day and Moran and his friends accused the two of being faithless to O'Hearn. The breach between the men was widened more by O'Donnell's brother arresting a barber on election day.

The shooting scrape of last night is not the first in which O'Donnell has figured. He was shot in the back by J. D. Cosby, proprietor of the Cosby hotel, following a fight in the hotel. At the same time J. P. Hayes, who was with O'Donnell, was shot twice in the back. The shooting was in February, 1908.

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June 29, 1909

JOSHES NEW COP AND
IS PROMPTLY PINCHED.

AUDITOR'S PAYMASTER SAID
"OH, YOU KID."

A Jewish policeman, the first Kansas City ever had, arrested an Irishman last night for disturbing the officer's peace.

Max Joffy, formerly a porter in James Pendergast's saloon and later a janitor at the city hall under Mayor Henry M. Beardsley, was appointed a probationary patrolman on the police force yesterday morning along with forty-three other men.

Proudly wearing his new star and swinging a white ash club he entered the drug store of Morton Burger at Independence avenue and Cherry street yesterday afternoon. Frank O. Donnely, paymaster in the city auditor's office, was in the drug store. Knowing Joffy for years he was amused at the Jewish policeman's outfit and burst out laughing.

"Holy St. Patrick, look at the new cop," laughed Donnely, making a grimace, "Oh, you kid!"


Joffy's new found dignity was touched. He placed his hand on Donnelly's back and said:

"I'll teach you to talk that way to an officer. Come on down to the station."

Donnelly rose from the fountain, where he was drinking an ice cream soda, with a glass holder in his hand. Joffy drew his revolver, afterwards found to be unloaded, and with the tags still upon it. Donnelly's Irish spirit ebbed and he submitted. He was taken to the central police station where he was booked for disturbing the peace. He afterward gave bond.

"I know nothing of the merits of the case against Donnelly," said Captain Walter Whitsett last night, "but I do know that a police officer's peace cannot be disturbed, according to the law as it is interpreted by the courts."

Donnelly is a rising young Democratic politician in the Sixth ward. He has been paymaster in the city auditor's office for three years. He lives with his family at 632 Troost avenue.

"I couldn't resist the temptation to have a little fun at Joffy's expense," he said. "I have known the man for five years and had never seen him take offense at a well meant joke before. This is the first time I was ever arrested in my life."

STRANGE NAMES IN LIST.

The list of forty-three officers appointed by the board yesterday bears only one Irish name -- that of Daniel R. McGuire, who was made a jailer. There are such cognomens as Obrecht, Zinn, Mertz, Baer, Niemier and Siegfried. They were given clubs, stars and revolvers yesterday afternoon and will be assigned for duty today.

Joffy was not on duty at the time his first arrest was made. He is the first policeman of Jewish descent to be appointed in the city, according to men who have been on the force for many years.

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June 17, 1909

ATTEMPTS MURDER TO
CONCEAL RECORD OF
POLICE PROBE.

THUG STRIKES DOWN MISS A. LEE
OWEN IN HER OFFICE IN
DWIGHT BUILDING.

WON'T STOP
INVESTIGATION.

MAYOR OFFERS A REWARD.

Young Woman Was Alone in Her
Office When Murderous Assailant
Tried to Crush Her Skull With a
Black Jack -- Commissioner Marks
Orders Men Who May Be Attacked
to Shoot to Kill -- Governor Had-
ley May Offer Reward Today.
Girl Struck Down by Unknown Assailants.
UNKNOWN THUG STRIKES DOWN POLICE BOARD'S GIRL STENOGRAPHER; STEALS RECORD OF INVESTIGATION.

Struck on the left temple with a "black jack" by an unknown thug, Miss Anna Lee Owen, a public stenographer who has been taking the evidence in the investigation held by the police commissioners, was knocked unconscious while at work in her office, 605 Dwight building, last night and a part of her stenographic notes stolen. She was taken to the University hospital immediately after being found by Hugh E. Martin. She is said to be in critical condition. Her skull probably is fractured.

Mayor Crittenden personally offers a reward of $100 for the arrest of her assailant.

The attack upon Miss Owen was made some time between 6:30 and 7:15 o'clock, while she was alone in her office. She regained consciousness before being removed to the hospital, but was not able to furnish a description of her assailant.


STRUCK FROM BEHIND.

Miss Owen's office is separated from the hall by a reception room. When Mr. Martin left the office at 6:30, she was at work on the notes. The hall door was closed and also the door leading from the reception room into her office. Mr. Martin returned to his office at 7:15. Opening the door into Miss Owen's office, he found her huddled on the floor. Believing she had fainted from overwork, he lifted her head and was startled by her groaning as if injured.

Liquor which was kept in another office in the suite was secured by Martin and he rubbed the young woman's head with it. She partially revived and exclaimed, "Mother, they have taken my notes." Dr. Eugene Carbaugh was summoned to attend Miss Owen, and Commissioner Thomas R. Marks was notified. He informed the police and then took personal charge of the case.

Cowardly Assault by a Brutal Thug With a Black Jack.
A BLACK JACK, SUCH AS WAS PROBABLY USED IN THE COWARDLY ASSAULT ON MISS OWEN.

Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle carried Miss Owen down stairs in the elevator and placing her in an automobile assisted Dr. Carbaugh in supporting her during the drive to the hospital.

From what little Miss Owen could tell last night she was working over her typewriter when she heard a step behind her chair. Knowing that the men who had offices in the suite had gone home, she looked up to see who it was. She had not heard the outer doors opened. Just as she secured a glance of the figure of a man, she was struck down.

IMPORTANT EVIDENCE GONE.

The stenographic notes and transcripts which she had made during the trials and investigations before the police commissioners were always carefully guarded by Miss Owen, who was afraid an attempt would be made to steal them. The notes were securely locked up in the office vault each night. When an investigation was made after she regained consciousness it was found that a large part of her notes were missing.

Just what notes were secured is not known. It was said that the evidence given late yesterday afternoon in the trial of the case against the conduct of the saloon conducted by James Redmond, 1205 Walnut street, were not secured. But it is believed that a large part of the testimony in the other investigations was lost.

ENTIRE FORCE AT WORK.

Through the inability of Miss Owen to assist the police by furnishing a description of her assailant, and also the failure of the police to elicit any information from the elevator operators was impossible to secure a clue to work on. No one could be found last night who had seen or noticed any stranger loitering in the halls or around the office in the Dwight building.

When Commissioner Marks arrived he ordered that the police make every possible effort to capture the thug, and until midnight he was actively engaged in directing the police in their work. The police were not notified of the assault until 8 o'clock, and inspector Boyle dispatched e very officer in the headquarters at the time to the scene. He and Captain Whitsett followed and were closeted with the commissioner for some time. Every detective in the city was called in and placed at work upon the case. The the substations were notified, and in all over 150 police officers were engaged in searching the city.

GIRL AND MARKS SHADOWED.

After the assault last night Commissioner Marks informed the police that he had been followed and shadowed by two men since he began his activity in the police shakeup. Not only has Mr. Marks been trailed, but Miss Owen has been dogged by two men to and from her work in the city. She was not positive of this surveillance, according to Mr. Marks, until Tuesday evening after the adjournment of the police board.

Intuitively feeling that she was being followed, Miss Owen boarded a Twelfth street car and transferred to a Northeast car. Arriving at Budd park she left the car and entered the park. All of this time the suspected man was in close proximity. At the park he disappeared for a time but was on hand when she again got on a car to ride into the city. She went to the Dwight building after leaving the car and while on the sixth floor saw the man in the hall. She then went to the office of Mr. Marks and informed him of what she had done.

GIRL FREQUENTLY ANNOYED.

Telling her to hold a handkerchief to her mouth if she saw the man on the street, Mr. Marks went down and walked around. He found a man on the street who appeared to fit the description of the man who had bothered Miss Owen, but she denied he was the one. The police were not notified at any time previous to the assault that either Miss Owen or the commissioner were being shadowed.

On another occasion it is said Miss Owen was frightened by men who followed her about the streets and went to the Coates house for the night, instead of returning to her home. While there, it was said, she received a telephone message from some man who refused to give his name. The purport of the telephone message was that there was a man in an adjoining room who intended her harm.

The mother of Miss Owen, who visited her daughter at the University hospital last night in answer to questions, said that her daughter had never mentioned to anyone at home that she was annoyed by anyone or that she had ever been followed.

On orders received from Mr. Marks, the hospital authorities refused to allow anyone to see Miss Owen. Strict orders were issued to not allow anyone but the nurse, her physicians and mother to visit the young woman. A special nurse was secured for her and the police commissioner's orders included a special diet for Miss Owen.

Several hours after the assault Dr. A. H. Cordler was called in consultation and the patient was pronounced to be in a very critical condition.

BY AN IMPORTED THUG.

The Dwight building was thoroughly searched by the police. Every street car in the city, and especially those leading into the suburbs, was being ridden by a police officer all night long. The outgoing trains were watched, although the police believed that the man would endeavor to leave the city by street car.

Inspector Boyle said last night that it was his opinion that the attack upon Miss Owen, and the theft of the stenographic notes, was done by an imported thug. If it was accomplished by home talent the inspector expressed the opinion that it was done on the spur of the moment to cover, if possible, damaging testimony given during the recent investigation. If the thug was imported for the purpose, St. Louis is probably the city, Inspector Boyle said, and his belief is also that of Captain Whitsett and Chief of Police Frank Snow.

Two men who have already figured in the police investigation and the saloon trials were ordered arrested and locked up of investigation. The theory of the police is that while these two men did not do the work they could give valuable information as to who did. But the men had not been found at 1 o'clock this morning. Captain Whitsett said he believed that the man would be arrested before twenty-four hours had passed. Acting Chief Snow said the man would be in custody by morning and inspector Boyle was positive he could not escape arrest.

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June 14, 1909

CONFISCATE 22 CASES OF
BEER AT GALLAGHER'S.

POLICE ARREST 22 IN NORTH
END SUNDAY RAID.

Eight Women Beside Mrs. Gallagher,
Who, With Husband, Is Charged
With Selling Liquor With-
out a License.

Charged with selling liquor without a license, Jack Gallagher, ex-patrolman and former North End saloonkeeper, was arrested and locked up in the holdover at Central police station yesterday in default of $500 cash bond. He was arrested in a raid made by Captain Walter Whitsett on the Star hotel, Oak street and Independence avenue, at 11:30 o'clock yesterday morning.

Since Gallagher's saloon licenses were taken away from him by the board of police commissioners after he assaulted Albert King, a reporter for The Journal, he has been conducting a rooming house in the Star hotel.

Yesterday the lid in the North End was on extremely tight. Gallagher had twenty-two cases of bottled beer in a room in the hotel.

One of the numerous enemies Gallagher had made by his bullying attitude went to police headquarters about 11:00 and reported to Captain Whitsett that Gallagher was violating the excise laws. Calling Sergeant Edward McNamara and ten patrolmen, Captain Whitsett headed the squad in making the raid. Arriving at the Star hotel building, the police found the door leading to the rear stairway locked and barred. Entrance to the hotel was made by the front door.

TWENTY-NINE AND 22 CASES.

The captain and sergeant led the patrolmen in a rush up the stairway. Scattering out the patrolmen searched every room for evidence. Men and women, the police claim, were found drinking beer in several rooms. While searching the house the police discovered one room which was locked. Gallagher said he did not have the key. The prisoners were sent to the station in a patrol wagon which made three trips to take the twenty-nine persons placed under arrest.

When the locked room was entered twenty-two cases of bottled beer were found and sent to headquarters where they are held as evidence. Among the persons arrested were eight women besides Jack Gallagher's wife, who at midnight was released on a cash bond of $500.

All of those arrested said they lived at the hotel. Mrs. Gallagher denied that all of the women lived there, but said only two or three of them were roomers.

When the raid was made, Gallagher threatened to place charges against the police. Their jobs were to be had, according to him, and he told them he would get them. Until he was locked in the holdover Gallagher continued his swaggering tactics. He refused to discuss his arrest.

BEER FOR OWN USE.

Gallagher's wife informed the police that they had a government license, which expired in July. She denied that the police found anyone drinking beer, or that any beer had been sold. Before she was aware that the police had confiscated the beer, she said no evidence had been secured. When asked what they were doing with so many cases in the hotel, she said it was for their private use. Mrs. Gallagher said the police and newspapers were endeavoring to bankrupt them, but that they had plenty left. The habitues were released on $11 bond.

Jack Gallagher has had a varied experience in the North End, having been at various times a policeman, ward politician and saloonkeeper. Following numerous arrests for disturbing the peace, he was finally compelled to serve a term in the workhouse for an assault upon a newspaper man.

The officers participating in the raid under Captain Walter Whitsett were Sergeant Edward McNamara and Patrolmen George Hightower, Daniel Jones, P. J. Murphy, Vincent Maturo, Charles Walters, Walter Doman, Thomas Eads, Thomas Maddigan, Frank Rooth and Patrick Dalton.

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June 4, 1909

ENGHNELL ASKS FOR GUNS.

Released Member of Adam God's
Band Says He Needs Money.

To get money to buy clothes and something to eat, Willialm Enghnell, one of the Adam God band of fanatics, applied at police headquarters yesterday for the weapons which were taken from him at the time of the riot last December. since he was released by the prosecuting attorney he has been told he ought to recover the guns.

Chief Frank F. Snow and Captain Walter Whitsett gave him no satisfaction. They stated that enough trouble had been caused by the revolvers.

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May 23, 1909

THE WILL OF GOD IF
I AM HANGED: SHARP

LEADER OF RELIGIOUS FANATICS
DODGES RESPONSIBILITY.

Conflicting Testimony as to Who
Started the City Hall Riot
Brings Protest From
the Defendant.

SHARP TRIAL'S SECOND DAY: Defense still fails to indicate any trace of an insanity plea and continues to question along self-defense lines.
Sharp interrupts and contradicts Captain Whitsett, while latter testifies.
Patrick Clark, captain of police, tells of his fight, barehanded, with Sharp, who had both revolver and knife.
Testimony as to fight on river admitted only sparingly by Judge Latshaw.
Sharp gives out statement to effect that evidence which gets at the cause of the riot is being excluded. Also ridicules introduction of his overcoat as evidence, as not proving anything.

"If they sentence me to hang it will be the will of God."

With these words James Sharp was led back to his cell in the county jail after the second day of his trial on the charge of killing Michael Mullane, a patrolman, in the city hall riot. It was the first time during yesterday that he had mentioned religious matters.

The day closed with the evidence of the state two-thirds finished and with no more traces of an insanity defense than were shown on Friday. A. E. Martin, of counsel for Sharp, stated that he had not announced any defense and that his purpose would be to break down the testimony of the state's witnesses. All of his cross-questioning, however, as told in The Journal yesterday, was directed towards showing that the band of fanatics under Sharp's leadership did not provoke the riot, but that it was started by officers. Self-defense is the logical name for such a theory of the case. The state is expected to finish its testimony by Monday evening.

Police officers gave the greater part of the testimony yesterday. Of them, Captian Walter Whitsett was on the stand the longest time. Whitsett gave his age as 41, his service in the police department as twenty years and his residence as 2631 Gillham road. On the afternoon of the riot he was at his desk in the city hall as captain commanding the headquarters precinct.

CHILDREN WERE SHOOTING.

"I heard the shooting," testified Whitsett, "took my revolver out of my desk and ran to the street. I met Captain Clark, who had been wounded, on the stairs. When I got to the middle of the street I saw Mullane standing with a club in one hand and a revolver in the other. There was a man in front of him with a revolver. The women of the band also were near at the time. There was a man with a long beard standing on the opposite corner firing in the direction of Mullane."

"Who was this man?" asked Prosecutor Conkling.

"That's him right there," said the witness, indicating Sharp.

"What happened then?"

"I fired three or four shots at him and his revolver fell out of his hand. Two or three children came up behind and began to shoot at me. When I got back on the street, after going into the station for another revolver, I saw Mullane staggering toward headquarters and helped him in. Later we searched for Sharp but could not find him. We immediately sent his description to every officer in the city and notified the surrounding towns.

"On the evening of December 10 we got word from Olathe that Sharp was under arrest there. I went there that evening with Inspector Charles Ryan."

Court adjourned at noon with Whitsett still on the stand. In the afternoon he resumed his story of the trip to Olathe. He found Sharp there in the office of Sheriff Steed. Sharp's beard and hair had been cut and he was wounded in both hands. There was a hole through his hat.

"I talked to Sharp in the presence of Mr. Steed, Inspector Ryan and Hugh Moore, a newspaper man Sharp told us--"

Mr. Martin for the defense here objected to Whitsett's telling of Sharp's statement.

"If a written statement was taken that is the best evidence," said Martin.

The statement was shown to Captain Whitsett and identified by him. Weapons used in the city hall riot then were introduced in evidence. First there was Sharp's .45 caliber Colt revolver, the handle scarred by a shot. Sharp told Whitsett the weapon was shot out of his hand. Then there was a .45 caliber colt which Louis Pratt had carried.

"I was told by Sharp that Pratt had bought his weapon in Kansas City," said Whitsett, but Sharp spoke out sharply in court to the witness:

"I didn't say that. Why do you want to tell such stuff as that?"

"I don't know. He might have bought it up the river," responded Whitsett.

EXHIBITED THE WEAPONS.

Then was shown the 38-caliber Colt, which Sharp said his wife brought in her bosom from the houseboat. Lena Pratt's 32-caliber pistol was then exhibited and identified, and the knife, with its four-inch blade.

"What was the purpose of all these weapons, as Sharp told it to you?" asked Mr. Conkling.

"He said it was to resist any officer who might interfere with his preaching. He said he also had two rifles and a shotgun and another revolver, the latter used by Lulu Pratt."

The overcoat worn by Sharp the day of the riot was then shown to the jury, as were the remnants of Sharp's beard.

"Don't see why they want to show the coat," said Sharp to W. S. Gabriel, assistant prosecutor. It doesn't prove anything."

On cross-examination, Captain Whitsett was asked about happenings at the river, following the street fight, but the state objected successfully to most of the questions. Just after an objection had been sustained, Sharp spoke up and said:

"Your honor, can I have a word? This man wants to tell what happened there, and he is cut off. Now ---"

"Make your objection through your attorneys, Mr. Sharp," answered Judge Latshaw.

BARBER TESTIFIES.

Inspector Charles Ryan followed Captain Whitsett on the stand. He recounted substantially the same details of the shooting and the trip to Olathe.

George Robinson, 2905 Wyandotte street, a barber at 952 Mulberry street, was the next witness, and told how Sharp came into his shop sat in the chair of Chester Ramsey and had his hair and whiskers cut off.

"He didn't take his hands out of his pockets. He said: 'My hands were frosted up North, where I've been fishing. I want this job done in a hurry. I want to meet a friend and have to get on a train.'

"When the job was done, Ramsey took a purse out of Sharp's pocket and took 40 cents out of it. Then Sharp went away."

The defense objected to the testimony of Robinson on the plea that the state had given no notification that he would be called as a witness. The objection was overruled. Robinson was not cross-examined, but will be recalled by the defense to give further testimony.

Then came William Thiry, a farmer who lives near Monticello, Kas. "On the evening of December 9 Sharp came to my house," said Thiry. "My son opened the door and then I went out on the porch. Sharp was standing there. He said, 'Brother, I want to tell you my circumstances. Wait till I sit down,' and he sat down on the edge of the porch. 'I'm paralyzed, brother,' he resumed. 'I lay down over there on a strawstack and tried to die, but the laws of nature were against me.'

"He kept his hands in his overcoat pockets and asked for food and a night's lodging. 'I am no ordinary bum,' said he. 'I have money to pay for my keep over night.' I consulted with my wife and we decided we could not keep him, but we took him and fed him. I telephoned Mr. Beaver, my brother-in-law, who lives a quarter of a mile from me and Mr. Beaver said he could keep him. While I was telephoning, Sharp came into the ho use and listened to the conversation.

"At supper he spoke of being a peddler and that his partner had turned him down because he was paralyzed in his hands. He said he wanted to get back to town to a good hospital. It was 8 o'clock when he left my house. I fed him myself. He didn't take his hands from his pockets."

"I am willing to acknowledge anything this man says," remarked Sharp. "He treated me alright while I was there."

The defense fought the introduction of this testimony on the same theory it had advanced in the case of Robinson. It objected further to Thiry's relating some of the conversation. Mr. Conkling insisted it was relevant as combating a defense of insanity, if such was to be the defense.

"We have never announced what our defense would be," said Martin.

"You have done so repeatedly in open court while applying for continuances in this case," said Mr. Conkling.

Court was adjourned after the defense had secured permission to bring a number of witnesses from Lebanon, Mo.

OTHER WITNESSES.

In the course of the morning session Captain Clark, who lost an eye in the riot, gave his testimony. He lives at 538 Tracy avenue, and has been on the police force for twenty-one years. He was sergeant in immediate charge of headquarters station the afternoon of the riot. Testimony was also taken from Howard B. McAfee, business manager of Park college at Parkville, Mo., who was making a purchase on the Fourth street side of the city market when he heard children singing on Main street and went toward the gathering. He saw Dalbow come from the station and shake hands with Sharp. Then someone behind Sharp fired. He saw Mullane trying to get away from the women, who seemed to be pursuing him. then he saw Sharp and Clark in their encounter. He helped Clark into the station and when he looked again Sharp was gone.

Preceding Mr. McAfee, there testified Job H. Lyon, a traveling evangelist. Just before the riot he had a talk in the Workingman's Mission with Pratt. Sharp and Creighton, the last named in charge of the place. Being warned against antagonizing the police, Lyon said Sharp waved his hand and said: "I am God. If any policeman attempts to interfere with me, I'll kill him."

The witness said Sharp made similar statements while brandishing his revolver in the direction of the city hall. Pratt and Sharp, said Lyon, pointed revolvers at Dalbow when he approached. Sharp, said the witness, fired the first shot.

After Sharp had been brought to jail here, Lyon, who often holds Sunday meetings for the prisoners, accused the fanatic of falsehood in regard to the story he told the Mulberry street barber. He asked Sharp to attend the jail services and Sharp said he himself was god, and, of course, would not come. Then Lyon told him that God did not prevaricate and Sharp refused to have anything more to do with the evangelist.

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April 14, 1909

BERT BRANNON DISCHARGED.

Justice Says State Had No Case
Against Ex-Deputy Marshal.

"Not guilty," was the verdict rendered by Theodore Remley, justice of the peace, yesterday morning at the conclusion of the preliminary hearing of Bert Brannon, ex-deputy marshal. Brannon was arrested on April 6 by Detectives J. H. Farrell and Denver Mitchell, and charged with receiving and concealing stolen property.

One diamond pawned by Bert Brannon to Edward Costello, a saloonkeeper, was the "property" the police claimed had been stolen from L. V. Reichenbach on April 3.

Reichenbach and Henry Metzger, who had sold the diamond to Reichenbach, testified that the stone was identical with the one Reichenbach lost. Captain Walter Whitsett was not allowed to testify as to the conversation he had with Costello previous to the arrest of Brannon and left the court room in an indignant mood.

Brannon testified that he purchased the diamond from a pawnbroker, S. R. Alisky, 540 Main street, for $65 on March 29. It was bought "on time," he said. The diamond, Brannon said, was pawned to Costello on the same day for $35. Costello, the pawnbroker, and his clerk corroborated Brannon's testimony, and the pawnbroker produced his receipt book with Brannon's signature in it as evidence.

Judge Remley said the evidence produced by the state was not sufficient and he discharged Brannon. A "bum steer" on a horse race Brannon said was the cause of the "little inconvenience" which he suffered for one night in the city holdover.

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April 8, 1909

GOING TO GET EVEN,
BERT BRANNON SAYS.

Arraigned on Charge of Receiving
Stolen Property, Former Deputy
County Marshal's Out on Bond.

Bert Brannon, no longer deputy county marshal, entered police headquarters yesterday afternoon shortly after his arraignment on a charge of receiving stolen property and his release on bond, and secured his possessions in custody of the police. He calmly loaded his revolver and placed the deputy marshal's star in his pocket. He talked with several friends in the lobby.

"Did you ever hear of such a joke?" he asked. "Why, I have the receipt in my pocket from the jeweler who sold me the diamond. But I'm going to get even with the man who started this," and he nodded significantly at Captain Walter Whitsett's office. "Some people will wish they had never heard of me."

Brannon was arrested Tuesday evening and kept in the holdover at headquarters until yesterday afternoon, despite the efforts of political friends to secure his release. He was arraigned yesterday afternoon before Justice Theodore Remley on a charge of receiving stolen property, pleaded not guilty and was released on a bond signed by his attorney, T. A. J. Mastin, and Alderman James Pendergast. Brannon's preliminary hearing will be had before Justice Remley this morning at 9 o'clock. The property in question is a diamond stud.

An attorney made an attempt to speak to Brannon yesterday morning while he was held on an "investigation" charge, and was refused permission. He immediately went to the prosecuting attorney and demanded that a warrant be issued for the chief of police and Inspector Ryan, charging a violation of the statutes for holding Brannon "incommunicado" for more than twenty-four hours. The warrant was not issued.

Joel B. Mayes, county marshal, yesterday called in the commission of Brannon, who had been a deputy marshal. Mr. Mayes said he wanted no unpleasant comment on the men connected with his office. The fact that he let out this deputy, he said, should not be construed as meaning that he was convinced of Brannon's guilt or innocence. Mr. Mayes dictated a statement to this effect.

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April 6, 1909

EXIT JONES AND GALLAGHER.

Retiring Commissioners Draw Two
Months' Salary and Say Goodby
to Associates.

A sort of farewell service took place yesterday afternoon at city hall, when Elliott H. Jones and A. E. Gallagher, the retiring board of police commissioners, paid their last visit to police headquarters in an official capacity. Incidentally, it marked the first time in the memory of the oldest policeman that a Democratic board retired in favor of Republicans.

The two men first visited James Vincil, the secretary of the board, who probably will say adieu to his quarters within the next month. Both men drew their salaries which they had allowed to accumulate during the last two months and left office smiling.

"I'll have to loook into the room where we have had so many sessions," said Mr. Gallagher, and the two men paused at the door of the room where the weekly meeting takes place. Mr. Jones did not seem particularly sorry that the last meeting was over.

"Well, goodby, Mr. Vincil," said both men, as they left the secretary's office. "Good luck to you."

The retiring commissiones then paid a visit to Captain Whitsett, Chief Ahern and Captain Frank Snow. They conversed a few minutes at each place and wished all good luck.

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April 4, 1909

MAY GET WHITSETT'S JOB.

Rumored Captain Casey Will Go to
Headquarters Station.

It was common talk among the politicians at the city hall yesterday that in case the new board of police commissioners made a general shift of all officers now in command of their different outside stations Captain John J. Casey, who is now at No. 6 station, would be shifted to headquarters in the place of Captain Walter Whitsett. A few days ago Thomas A. Marks is reported to have said that there would be a general change as soon as the new board took control.

Captain Casey is considered the most likely candidate for the important place at headquarters, owing to the fact that his brother, Senator Michael Casey, was active in lining up the Democratic senate in favor of the confirmation of Marks and Middlebrook. Casey is considered to be one of the most efficient officers in the department.

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