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January 31, 1910

HOW JUSTICE ROSS
MADE HIS FORTUNE.

DONOR OF MONEY TO MA-
HONEY CHILDREN WAS
ONCE A LAMPLIGHTER.

Formed Partnership With
John Mahoney Twenty-
Five Years Ago.

Justice Michael Ross, of Kansas City, who in the Wyandotte county, Kansas, probate court Saturday gave the children of his dead partner, John Maloney, $50,000, was born in Cincinnati, O., December 19, 1859. His father, Alexander Ross, came to Kansas City in 1866 to aid in the erection of the first gas plant the city had. In June a year later, the family followed him, coming from St. Louis by boat.

"The Missouri was full of boats in those days," said Justice Ross last night, "and was the principal means of navigation between here and St. Louis. Kansas City had a real wharf and it was a busy one."

Two brothers, William J. and James Ross, and a younger sister constituted the children at that time. James was drowned while swimming in the Missouri river in 1872.

"We attended a little frame public school down in the East Bottoms just opposite what was known as Mensing Island," said Justice Ross. "Later we went to Washington school which still stands at Independence avenue and Cherry street. A ward school education was as high as one could go in those days unless he went away, and that was all we received."

After the erection of the gas plant Justice Ross and his brother William secured positions as lamp lighters. It required them to get up at all hours of the night, according to the condition of the weather and the fullness of the moon, both to light and turn out the street lamps. After doing this work at night Justice Ross worked all day on an ice wagon for J. E. Sales. Later on he worked in the old Davis brick yard, which stood about where the Zenith mill now stands in the East Bottoms.

Justice Ross always had in view the day when he would go into business for himself -- be his own boss. With his savings and some help from his mother he started a little grocery and general store on the levee at First and Campbell streets in 1874. After a time his brother, William, was taken into partnership, but remained but a few years. The latter for several terms was a member of the city council.

BOUGHT OTHER STORES.

As the city began to grow away from the river, Justice Ross saw better opportunities and opened a grocery store at 1401-3 East Fifth street, at Lydia avenue, and later another at 1100-2 East Fifth street, at Troost avenue. These two stores were money makers and enabled him later to branch out along other lines.

In September, 1888, Justice Ross was married to Miss Bessie Egan. All of their children, seven boys and four girls, are living, the oldest daughter being away at school near Cincinnati, and the oldest boy at St. Mary's, Kas. Six of the nine children at home attend the Woodland school.

"I knew John Mahoney from the day he came here with the C. & A. railroad," Justice Ross said. "He was doing small jobs of grading in those days and his mother went with him over the country. They used to trade with us at the little store on the levee and when in town Mahoney and his mother stopped at our home."

It was almost twenty-five years ago that Mahoney and Ross went into partnership and the latter has been a silent partner ever since, Mahoney seeing to most of the details and looking after the work. Justice Ross also had other interests, such as tree planting, and planted the trees around the finest residences and along many of the prettiest boulevards. In speaking of some of the work done by himself and Mr. Mahoney, the justice said:

"We built all of the Southwest boulevard, also Fifteenth street, doing the grading work. Roanoke boulevard is another piece of our work, as was the ill-fated Cliff drive, where poor John and his wife met such a tragic fate. We did lots of work on the country roads in Jackson county and built almost all of the roads in Wyandotte county, besides many of the brick-paved streets.

LARGE CONTRACT WORK.

"We also did much work away from here, such as government work on the levee at New Orleans, county roads in Southern Indiana and railroad grading in Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado. Mahoney was a man who made friends wherever he went. I just received a letter from Indiana asking if he and McGuire were the same men who were there asking for all particulars."

As Justice Ross's business ventures thrived he found it impossible to give the time required to his two grocery stores, and a few years ago he disposed of them. Previous to that, however, he had established the Missouri Carriage and Wagon works at 308-10 Broadway, which he still operates.

For many years he has been buying property and erecting modern flats thereon. He does not build flats to sell, but he keeps them for what they bring in. When Admiral boulevard was cut through at Virginia avenue, Justice Ross owned a big row of old flats immediately in the right of way. They are brick and their moving back was the biggest job of that kind ever done in this city. He made them modern and is erecting more flats near them.

The prettiest and most costly structure erected by Justice Ross is a flat building at Benton boulevard and St. John avenue, on a promontory overlooking the entire city. He owns forty or more pieces of improved property in the city.

In the fall of 1898 Michael Ross ran for justice of the peace on the Democratic ticket and was elected. Since then he has held the office for three terms, twelve years, winning each time with ease. He said last night, however, that he would not seek the office again. He intends to build a big home in the southern part of the city and he and Mrs. Ross will devote their time to their children. He now lives at 626 Troost avenue.

"John Mahoney almost decided to go to Jacksonville, Fla., with our party," said the Justice. "The ground was frozen and he could not work. But he was such a home-loving man he hated to leave his family, even for a day. I had a premonition when I left that something would happen. When I got the wire the first thing I thought of was his automobile. We did not get the particulars, however, until we got a paper at Memphis, and did not get full particulars and learn that McGuire was killed and the others hurt until we got The Journal at Paola, Kas.

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October 20, 1909

YELLS SAVE HIS VALUABLES.

Burglar Flees After Commanding
Real Estate Man to Keep Quiet.

A beam of light from an electric torch shining in his eyes awoke E. A. Norris of 3427 Campbell street, real estate dealer and formerly county assessor, from a dreamless sleep early yesterday morning.

Sitting up in bed, Norris looked down the barrel of a big revolver, backed by a rough command to "lay down and keep quiet."

A series of yells on the part of Norris for the police were sucessful in putting the intruder to flight before he had a chance to make away with anything of value.

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October 13, 1909

BIG PARADE HELD IN
HONOR OF COLUMBUS.

ITALIAN SOCIETIES COMMEM-
ORATE DISCOVERY.

Replica of Santa Maria, With "In-
dians" Aboard, a Feature --
Music and Speeches at
City Garden.

Columbus day, commemorating the discovery of America on October 12, 1492, was celebrated in Kansas City yesterday for the first time. A bill making October 12 a legal holiday passed the last legislature.

As the great "Christopher Colombo" was an Italian, born in Genoa, Italy, the Italians of Kansas City took the lead yesterday in celebrating the day. Ever since July 4 last the representative Italians of the city have been working on a monster parade, and yesterday the people viewed the result of their labors. The parade formed at the Holy Rosary church, Fifth and Campbell streets, and was headed by a line of carriages. In the first were Mayor Crittenden, Justice Michael Ross and Michael E. Casey, the state senator who drew up the bill making October 12 a holiday. Judge Harry G. Kyle, W. H. Baehr, city treasurer, and other city officials were in the other carriages with representative Italian citizens. Following these were members of many Italian lodges and societies.

SANTA MARIA IN PARADE.

The most attractive feature of the parade was a replica of the Santa Maria, the boat on which Columbus sailed to America. On board were sailors and "Indians." Frank Bascone, dressed to represent Columbus, stood in the boat, telescope in hand, apparently searching for land. Four bands were in the line of march.

After forming at Fifth and Campbell the parade went south to Sixth street, east on Sixth to Gillis, north on Gillis to Fifth and west to Walnut street, thus traversing the very heart of the Italian quarter known as "Little Italy." Crowds lined both sides of the street through the entire North End.

The line of march was continued down Walnut street to Sixteenth, on that street to Grand avenue and thence to the City garden, about Nineteenth and Grand, where the real celebration was held. Mayor Crittenden, Senator Casey and Judge Kyle made speeches in English, the best they could do. Speeches in Italian were made by Professor G. G. Langueri, Rev. Father John Marchello and Rev. Maxdano, minister of the Italian Evangelist church.

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September 30, 1909

TWO WEDDINGS, ONE GOLDEN.

Daughter Married on Fiftieth An-
niversary of Parents.

A double wedding, one of them a golden one, took place at the home of Miss Alice Francis at 1410 Campbell street last night at half past 7 o'clock. At the same time her sister, Miss Jeanette Francis, was married to Norman H. Korte, agent for the Illinois Central at Paris, Ill, her mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Franois of Clinton, Ill, were presented with their golden wedding gifts, and Rev. J. L. Thompson blessed their union of fifty years.

Mr. Francis is 77 years of age and his wife 68. Half a century ago yesterday they were married at Clinton, Ill.

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August 4, 1909

GIFT OF $50,000 TO
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE.

Thomas H. Swope Offers $25,000
in Cash and Ground on Camp-
bell Near Sixteenth Street
for New Building.

Thomas H. Swope, already Kansas City's manifold benefactor, has given $50,000 to Franklin institute, half in land, half in cash. Unless the donor should extend the time limit the gift will be forfeited November 1 if an additional $50,000 is not raised by that date.

A noon meeting of the directorate of the institute was held yesterday and the members decided to supplement the donation by $5,000 or $10,000 to be raised among their own number. No city-wide campaign for funds will be made, but a quiet effort will be put forth to obtain the money from friends of the social settlement.

Little apprehension that the required amount cannot be raised is entertained.

Henry f. Holt of the architectural firm of Howe & Holt, is one of the directors of the institute. He will set about at once planning the building which the Swope gift makes possible. The site donated lies on the west side of Campbell street between Sixteenth and Seventeenth. Its dimensions are 105 x 142 feet.

Established six years ago, Franklin institute has grown amid adverse conditions. It is now located at Nineteenth and McGee streets, in a two-story frame house which is rented from month to month. In spite of the obstacles which had to be overcome, the work of the settlement has attracted the substantial attention of many Kansas Cityans interested and informed on matters of charity.

For some time Mr. Swope has entertained a strong interest in the results of institutional work, and after acquainting himself with the philanthropic activity of Franklin institute made known his intention to help it to the extent of $50,000. His gift was made with absolutely no solicitation on part of friends of the institute.

Ralph P. Swofford is president of the institute, and J. T. Chafin is head resident. The other officers are Henry D. Faxon, vice president; Fletcher Cowherd, treasurer, and Herbert V. Jones, secretary.

The directorate is made up of William Cheek, Henry F. Holt., R. H. McCord, Rabbi Harry H. Mayer, Howard F. Lee, Benjamin B. Lee, H. J. Diffenbaugh, W. J. Berkowitz, George T. Vance, I. D. Hook, D. L. James and E. L. McClure.

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August 1, 1909

MISS HENRIETTA TILL WEDS.

Eloped to St. Joseph With Edmond
Kuenster Last Monday.

Last Monday morning Miss Henrietta Till, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Till, 4404 Campbell street, started for Lake Crystal, Minn., to spend the remainder of the summer. She was expected to arrive there Tuesday morning, and in due time there arrived in Kansas City the expected telegram from Lake Crystal:

"Arrived safely. -- Henrietta."

Yesterday afternoon there came a second telegram, this one to The Journal, dated St. Joseph, saying that Miss Till had been married by Father O'Donnell of the Holy Rosary church in St. Joseph Monday to Edmond Kuenster, a clerk in the Kansas City Bell telephone office. Kuenster had been paying attentions to Miss Till for a year, and it was understood there would be a wedding in the fall.

Asked if there had been opposition to his daughter marrying Kuenster, Mr. Till said there had been on his part, which probably accounted for the elopement.

The first the Till family knew of the marriage was Thursday afternoon when Kuenster called up the Till residence and said he was talking from St. Joseph, where relatives of his mother live. The new Mrs. Kuenster confirmed the report.

After that came news from another source that on Monday afternoon Kuenster and Miss Till, accompanied by a member of one of the Tootle firms in St. Joseph, went to the acting bishop of St. Joseph for a dispensation to allow the runaways to be married there. This was granted and the pastor of the Holy Rosary church performed the ceremony.

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July 16, 1909

HACKMEN FIGHT AT FUNERAL.

Harry Vaughan Sustains Fracture of
Skull and Recovery Doubtful.

Harry Vaughan, 17 years old, a hack driver living at 818 East Fourteenth street, Kansas City, Mo., and employed by the Wood Bryant and E. Landis Livery Company, Fifteenth and Campbell streets, was probably fatally injured yesterday during a quarrel with Tom Harper, a driver employed by the J. W. Snoddy Livery Company. Vaughan was struck on the head with a rock and his skull fractured at the base of the brain. He was removed to the South Side hospital where the attending physicians said his recovery was doubtful. Harper escaped after striking Vaughan and at a late hour last night had not been captured.

The two men with their carriages had been engaged to attend the funeral of Mrs. W. I. Davis in Rosedale. While services were being held at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues and the carriages were in line ready to take up the funeral procession, the two men had an altercation. Harper, it is alleged, threw a brick, striking Vaughan in the head and while the latter was still staggering Harper lifted a large rock with both hands and struck his victim again. He then ran and the last seen of him he was making his way toward Argentine. The injured boy was given emergency treatment by Dr. O. M. Longnecker and Dr. B. T. Sharp.

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July 12, 1909

3 DEAD AS RESULT
OF BOMB EXPLOSION.

FIREWORKS DISPLAY NEAR A
CHURCH ENDS FATALLY.

Italians of Holy Rosary Congrega-
tion Were Celebrating St. John's
Day -- Two Negroes Are
Instantly Killed.

The upright figure is sketched from a duplicate of the iron pipe which was also to have been fired. The upper figure is a sketch of the piece which killed the woman and the lower figure is a sketch of the piece which was hurled through the house at 511 Campbell street.


Amidst a throng of 700 persons who gathered at Fifth and Campbell streets last night to watch the celebration of St. John's day, a bomb exploded, instantly killing Clarance Harrington, a negro of 511 Lydia avenue, and Anna Fields, a negro woman of 568 Harrison street; and so seriously wounding Tony Grassiffe, an Italian living at 311 East Third street, that he died at 10:45 o'clock.

The bomb was one used in the pyrotechnical display being held under the direction of the Holy Order of St. John, an organization of the Holy Rosary Roman Catholic church, Fifth and Campbell streets. Tony Grassiffe, one of the victims, was the master of ceremonies and for almost an hour he had been lighting bombs, rockets and Roman candles, while the crowd gathered denser in the street.

Grassiffe finally planted the huge cast iron pipe, loaded with dynamite and a bomb, in the center of a low corner lot. He had been warned to completely cover the bomb with dirt, and to plant it deep. Ignorance or carelessness caused him to leave the bomb in its two feet of iron pipe standing uncovered in the lot. He lighted the fuse and before he could gain his feet the explosion occurred.

NEGROES INSTANTLY KILLED.

Grassiffe's left leg at the knee was completely severed by the bursting projectile. A huge piece of the iron was hurled westward and struck the negro woman full on the right side of her face, tearing it away, and leaving only a small portion of the skull. Another, and smaller piece, struck Harrington in the center of his forehead, crushing his skull and tearing part of it away. The two negroes dropped in their tracks, dead. The woman lay across the sidewalk grasping a palm leaf fan in her hand. The man fell close by her side.

Sergeant D. J. Whalen was standing within three feet of the woman when she fell. He was struck in the chest by a piece of mortar, but was uninjured. Officer Lee Clarry was standing still closer to the negro, and escaped without a scratch.

PENETRATES HOUSE WALL.

One piece of the iron pipe was hurled northward with a force which caused it to penetrate the wall of a house, seventy-five feet distant, and continue its course within, plunging through a two-inch door and spending its force against the other wall of the building.

Seated at a window, not three feet from the point where the projectile entered the wall, was Tony Gafucci. He was thrown from his chair, and lay on the floor of his room, momentarily stunned. The house number is 511 Campbell street.

Instantly after the sound of the explosion, the great crowd surged forward to where the dead bodies were lying. The police officers held them back, and themselves ascertained the condition of the negroes. Seeing that both were dead, the officers hastened to aid Grassiffe, whom they heard groaning and crying for help. They picked the injured man up from the hollow and carried him into a nearby drug store.

The police ambulance was hastily called, and Dr. E. D. Twyman accompanied it to the scene of the explosion. As he alighted at the spot where the negroes were lying on the sidewalk, and stooped down to make examinations, the uncontrollable crowd of negroes and Italians surged forward closer still, knocking over the surgeon.

COULDN'T SAVE ITALIAN.

When Dr. Twyman reached Grassiffe he found the injured man to be in a dangerous condition. Nothing could be done to stop the terrible flow of blood from the severed limb. The surgeon ordered a record drive to the emergency hospital, where every effort was made to save the life of the injured man. He was kept alive until 10:45 o'clock, by means of artificial respiration and then died.

By some means Grassiffe's wife gained entrance to the hospital and, gazing upon the form of her husband, became hysterical. It was necessary for Dr. H. T. Morton to administer an opiate to quiet the woman, who was shrieking strange Italian chants at the top of her voice, pausing now and then to cross herself and mutter a hurried prayer.

The coroner was notified of the deaths and ordered the negroes bodies taken to Moore's undertaking establishment, 1033 Independence avenue.

The celebration last night was held in spite of the constant warnings given out by Father Charles Delbecchi, in charge of the Holy Rosary church. He had just left his church, where he had warned once more of the dangers of fireworks.

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July 5, 1909

QUIET FOURTH, BUT
MANY ACCIDENTS.

TWO KANSAS CITYS HAVE LONG
LIST OF CASUALTIES.

Big Demand for Tetanus Anti-Toxin
at Emergency Hospital -- Four
Boys Hurt in One Explosion.

It was one of the quietest Fourths of July the two Kansas City's ever experienced. But the real test will come today. Many minor accidents were reported yesterday, and there were a number of applications to Dr. W. L. Gist of the emergency hospital for injections of tetanus anti-toxin to ward off the possibility of lockjaw from injuries.

Victim No. 1 to ask for aid at the dispensary was Willie Parrish, 9 years old, 1230 Drury avenue. Willie was playing with a friend named Clarence Cott, who was handling a pistol. It was accidentally discharged and a piece of the gun wad entered the palm of Willie's left hand.

A blank cartridge which S. Stern, 10 years old, 571 Campbell street, accidentally discharged, injured his right hand. He went to the emergency hospital and Dr. Gist cauterized the wound and gave him an injection of tetanus anti-toxin.

CHILD MAY LOSE EYE.

William Meyer, 14 years old, 2108 West Prospect avenue, was wounded yesterday afternoon while playing with a 22-caliber pistol. A wad struck him on the left hand, which was dressed in the emergency hospital. The surgeon made use of 1,5000 units of the anti-toxin which Dr. W. S. Wheeler secured to prevent tetanus infection.

Powder burns, suffered when his brother, John, snapped a toy pistol containing a blank cartridge, probably will cost Charles Grube, aged 6 years, 838 South Pyle street, Armourdale, the sight of his right eye.

Only a few boys and no grown-ups were arrested yesterday for noisy celebration of the Fourth. One boy was taken in at Central police station during the forenoon for exploding a cannon cracker on West Fifth street. His father appeared in a few minutes. Only $4 was necessary too get this juvenile lawbreaker from behind the bars. Police station Nos. 9, 5, 4 and 6 also made an arrest apiece, all the boys being released on minimum bonds.

Thomas Rogers, a negro 14 years old, applied at the emergency hospital last night for treatment, saying he feared he was suffering from lockjaw. Thomas shot himself in the hand with a toy pistol July 2. A piece of the cap was imbedded in the skin. One thousand five hundred units of anti-toxin was administered, and the boy sent home. He was instructed to keep his hand in hot water during the night.

Probably the most serious accident in Kansas City, Kas., was the injury sustained by S. A. Brophy, a street car conductor, living at 332 North Tenth street. The wadding from a blank cartridge entered his left thigh on the inside of the leg and caused a wound which Dr. W. R. Palmer, the attending physician, said last night might prove serious. Brophy was talking to a fellow street car conductor, L. J. Clark, when the latter pointed a gun at him and pulled the trigger.

BOY MAY LOSE HAND.

Roy Irvine, 5 years old, was injured by a piece of tin which flew from a torpedo and buried itself in the third finger of his left hand. He was treated at the home of his father, R. W. Irvine, 727 Central avenue.

Herman Fielder, 11 years old, was shot through the palm of his left hand by the wadding from a blank cartridge. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis, and removed to his home, 940 Ohio avenue. Charles Orr, 931 Tenney avenue, held a firecracker in his left hand while it exploded and may lose the index finger of his left hand as a result. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis. Mrs. M. Westerman, 318 North Tenth street, fell and dislocated her left shoulder while attempting to get away from a bunch of firecrackers which had been thrown near her. Mrs. Westerman is 62 years old, and was suffering great pain last night. She was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis.

Nathan Spicer, a merchant at 40 North James street, shot himself through the palm of the right hand while explaining the mechanism of a revolver to a prospective customer. He was attended by Dr. C. H. Brown, assistant police surgeon. James Whipple, 20 North James street, was struck by a flying particle during an explosion near his home and was burned on the left hand.

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June 21, 1909

HARRY STEMPLMAN MARRIES.

Banquet and Ball Follows Ceremony
at Colonial Hall.

Mr. Harry Stemplman of Kansas City and Miss Annie Eisberg were married last night at Colonial hall.

The bride was attended by members of her immediate family and the groom by his youngest brother, they all standing under the improvised canopy which Jewish customs prescribe, while Rabbi Isidore Koplowitz read and chanted the marriage ceremony.

The the wedding cup was passed and the banquet begun . Despite the heat of the evening seventy-five couples swung out upon the floor of the Colonial hall and danced.

The groom is the son of Ben Stemplman and had lived at 1717 Campbell street. He and his bride will make the Savoy hotel their home for the immediate present.

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March 25, 1909

KILLS HIS FRIEND
IN JEALOUS RAGE.

JOSEPH FLANAGAN TOO ATTEN-
TIVE TO MRS. LEON BRADY.

Husband, Returning From Office,
Finds Attentions Being Forced
on His Wife -- Fires
Three Shots.

Opening the door of his room to find his wife struggling to free herself from the grasp of another man, Leon Brady of 1014 East Fifteenth street, a mechanical draftsman in the employ of the board of education, shot and fatally wounded Josehp Flanagan, a land promoter of El Hito, N. M. The shooting occurred at 1:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon in the hallway of the boarding house at 1014 East Fifteenth streeet, where both Flanagan and the Brady family lived.

Upon arriving at his office at 1526 Campbell street shortly after lunch yesterday afternoon, Brady "felt that something was wrong at home." He went immediately to the East Fifteenth street boarding house and found the door of his room locked and his wife inside. His wife responded to his knock.

"After I had been in the room a few moments, my wife went out and down to the second floor. I shut the door and waited for her to return. In about five minutes I heard her cough. I listened and she coughed again. Then I went to the door and waited. I could not hear anything at first, but in a moment I heard someone whispering and it seemed excited. Then I heard my wife say: 'No! No! No!' in a half frightened, half sobbing tone.

RELOADED HIS REVOLVER.

"I cannot explain my action and I cannot tell how I feel about it now. I saw my wife struggle and I knew the man. I was white with rage and I could not control myself. It was that kind of a situation about which little is remembered and nothing is clear."

Brady rushed to the bureau and grabbed his revolver. Throwing the door open he saw Flanagan and his wife. Then he fired.

Flanagan fell at the first shot. Mrs. Brady uttered a cry and her husband fired twice again at his victim. Flanagan then arose and groped his way to his own room, while Brady went back and put two more cartridges in his revolver. Mrs. Brady, at her husband's request, went to the telephone and notified the police.

Flanagan was taken to the general hospital, where he died two hours later. In his statement to Assistant Prosecutor Garrett, he said he realized he was about to die and had given up all hope. He declared that his relations with Mrs. Brady had never been otherwise than friendly.

At the Walnut street police station where Brady surrendered he stated that Flanagan had persistently attempted to force his attention upon Mrs. Brady. "Flanagan was under the influence of liquor a week ago and he came to our room in that condition. He called my wife by her first name, Rose, and this impression of intimacy with my wife angered me," he said.

"Last Sunday I went out to my father's house at 3115 Benton boulevard, and took Billy, my year-old son, with me. While there someone called me on the telephone, and a woman's voice said, 'You had better come home and see what is doing.' I immediately returned to the boarding house.

BRADY CAN'T EXPLAIN.

"My wife told me when I arrived at the house that Flanagan had come to her room after I left and said to her, 'You are expecting someone.' She told me she was offended by his talk and manner, and asked him why he had taken advantage of my absence to come and see her. He told her that I need not know about it, and my wife told him that she would tell me. Flanagan was angry at that, and said to her, 'I'll fix you if you do. I'll do you dirt.' "

According to the statements of both men, they were out walking together the two evenings before the shooting took place. Both say that on no occasion had Mrs. Brady ever been mentioned by them.

Yesterday at noon when Brady came to lunch he found Flanagan already at the table and sat down with him. They talked during the meal and afterward Brady carried a lunch up to his wife, who is ill and confined to her room.

In an ante-mortem statement Flanagan said Mrs. Brady came out of the room in to the passageway, and following her, Brady appeared and shot him without saying a word. "I fell after the first shot," said he, "and then he fired twice more. I said, 'Oh Brady, Brady, Brady! Why have you done this?' His wife said nothing; simply stood there.

"We had always been good friends and he had never spoken to me about her. She told me to look out for him two days ago. I did not know anything was wrong or that he had anything against me until his wife told me. I ate lunch with him today and and boarded at the same house with them. I have known both of them about four months."

THE BRADY ROMANCE.

Brady is a graduate of the engineering department of Columbia university in New York and is the son of J. H. Brady, chief engineer of the board of education of Kansas City. He was yesterday elected president of the National Association of Heating and Sanitary Engineers in New York. Young Brady is said by his classmates to have been exceptionally bright and stood high with his teachers and others.

Leaving school he went to Mexico as a mining engineer. While riding on the cowcatcher of one of the small locomotives employed about the mines, the engine struck a burro standing in the tracks. The animal fell on Brady and the force of the impact broke his leg in two places. The injured man was taken to the house of the mine superintendent and nursed back to health by the daughter of the household. During the days when he lay helpless on his bed, he and the girl formed a friendship that gradually ripened into love and they were married three years ago. Since that time a son has been born. The son is a little more than a year old and at the boarding house on East Fifteenth street was the universal favorite.

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December 30, 1908

ITALIANS WILL HOLD A
MASS MEETING SUNDAY.

To Raise Money for Relief of Stricken
People -- Many Have Rela-
tives in Sicily.


Local Little Italy, which might more specifically be called Lesser Sicily, since most of its residents come from that stricken island, received the news of the earthquake that killed scores of thousands with an expectant stoicism that utterly belies what books say about the volatile Italian nature. It was expectant, in that the Sicilians and Calabrians of Kansas City are bravely awaiting the horrible details which only days can bring forth. Accounts at best are but meager and the fate of the members of their families cannot be known for a fortnight.

They are not wringing their hands in anguish. Instead, they are occupied with a demonstration much more to the purpose.

"We must get together and raise some money for them," said Dr. L. Laurenzana of 522 East Fifth street, last night. With that he stepped to the telephone and called up the Italian consul, Pietro Isnardi. A business-like conversation in Italian ensued.

MASS MEETING CALLED.

"A mass meeting of all Italians in Kansas City will be held at the hall adjoining the Church of the Holy Rosary at Missouri avenue and Campbell street, Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock," said the doctor as he turned away from the telephone. "We raised nearly $400 for the earthquake sufferers in Calabria, three years ago, and we ought to do better than that this time."

Dr. Laurenzana has a cousin, Anello Alfano by name, who is a railroad contractor at Pizzo on the Calabrian toe of the Italian boot, only four miles and a half from Reggio, where so many thousands were killed Monday.

Walter Randazzo of 104 East Fifth street, too, has a cousin, Cologero Randazzo, who held a government position at Messina, where 12,000 people are said to have lost their lives.

"I came from Palermo," said Mr.Randazzo, "and, as I understand it, the western part of the island, where the city is located, was not badly affected by the quake. Palermo is a long way from Messina. You leave there on the train at night and don't reach Messina until the next morning."

MANY OF THEM HERE.

S. J. Tremonte, proprietor of the Italian Castle cafe at Fifth and Oak streets, comes from Gibbellins, a town of about 15,000 inhabitants, lying forty-four miles from Palermo. His parents and brothers still live there, but he is not apprehensive, as they are not in the affected district.

Pietro Berbiglia, who operates the Milano restaurant at 7 East Eighth street, has been in this country for ten years, and comes from Piggioreallia in Trapani province, not far from Palermo. He served in the Italian army and in 1898 was stationed at Catania, which is almost at the very foot of Mount Aetna, and which with Messina and Reggio suffered perhaps more heavily thatn any of the other cities.

"Catania is a beautiful place," he said last night, "and carries on a large shipping trade with Malta and other points on the Mediterranean. It has about 150,000 inhabitants and the Universita di Catania, with many students, is located there. It has a long and beautiful street which I think is more magnificent than anything even in Rome, called the Corso Garibaldi, running for about four miles along the seashore from Catania proper to Porto Garibaldi. There is also a large garden or park called the Villa Stema d'Italia, that is one of the prettiest in Italy."

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November 26, 1908

CRIPPLE BESTED BURGLARS.

Fired Upon Intruders as He Lay
Propped in His Bed.

Robbers who attempted to enter the second story flat at 1426 Campbell street, where J. F. Benge and his wife live, last night, were fired upon by the husband. Mr. Benge is a cripple, and is confined to his bed with sickness besides. Mrs. Benge left the house about 9:30, leaving the door only partly closed. Mr. Benge heard the men coming up the stairs and called out. They paused momentarily and then continued their ascent. He grasped his revolver and waited. A tall man entered the room, while a smaller one waited outside, covering his face with a black cloth.

"Throw up your hands and lie down," commanded one of them.

Instead, Mr. Benge raised one hand and fired. The ball passed harmlessly over the head of the foremost intruder. The men fled out the back way. The affair was reported to the police. Neither of the men was recognized.

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November 16, 1908

DRUNKEN MAN IS STRANGLED.

Henry Bernard Found Dead in an
Unfinished Building Near Thirty-
Third and Oak Streets.

Boys playing in a building in the course of construction at 3312 Oak street about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon found the body of a man lying in a corner of the building, the head wedged against a wall and the neck pressed against a joist. Death had come apparently from strangulation induced by the position of the man's head. A crowd collected and the body was identified as that of Henry Bernard, 50 years old, a stonemason living at 3228 Summit street.

By the man's side was found a pint bottle with dregs of whisky in it. Bernard had been released from the Walnut street police station yesterday morning at 6 o'clock. The question arises, where did he get the whisky?

Bernard had been locked up for safekeeping. When he was released he had nothing of the sort about him. About noon he appeared at the house of William Gepford, a building contractor, his employer, and received from him $10 which was due him for work done last week. Several times in the next few hours he was seen loafing around the drug store of R. S. McCurdy, at Twenty-third and Oak streets, and was talking to Ray Wells, 3120 Campbell street, and others. About 2 o'clock he appeared to be in an unsettled state of mind and was seen to walk towards the new building of which only the side walls and part of the floors are finished. It is thought that he lay down in a stupor and was strangled by the beam pressing against his throat.

Nominally, the saloons were closed yesterday. Besides, there are no saloons in the neighborhood of Thirty-third and Oak streets. Bernard was not seen to leave the neighborhood from the time he received the money from his employer until the time he was found dead. R. S. McCurdy, the druggist who keeps the drug store at Thirty-third and Oak streets, and the only one in the vicinity, said last night that he had sold whisky to Bernard on prescription, but denied that he had sold any to him that day. He added that neither he nor either of his clerks, Louis Woods and D. Self, had seen Bernard in the store that day.

Bernard leaves a wife and nine children. The body was removed to Lindday's undertaking rooms in Westport and the coroner was notified. He will hold an autopsy this morning at 9 o'clock in the undertaking rooms.

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August 17, 1908

ONE STREET'S SUICIDE MANIA.

Three Women Living on Campbell
Street Take Poison.

Carbolic acid and laudanum were the poisons taken as a means of committing suicide by three women living on Campbell street yesterday afternoon and last night. The first case to call out the ambulance and physician was that of Maggie Adams, a negress, 537 Campbell street, who had taken part of 10 cents' worth of carbolic acid. She had been drinking liquor all afternoon and was not in a dangerous condition when Dr. George E. Pipkin arrived. She was not taken to the hospital. Dr. Pipkin said he found but one reason for the woman taking the acid, which was that she had become tired of walking up the long flight of stairs leading from the street to her home.

Call No. 2 occurred about 7 o'clock and proved to be Mrs. Lena Wheeler of 928 Campbell street, who had taken laudanum. She was also treated by Dr. Pipkin and allowed to remain at her home.

At 8 o'clock the hospital received another poisoning case message and Dr. Julius Frischer responded. It was also on Campbell street at No. 532 and proved to be a negress named Pearl Redding. She was extremely nervous while drinking the acid and her face was seared with it. She was taken to the hospital and treated. During the rest of the night the doctors were prepared to handle any other cases of poisoning that might come in.

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July 24, 1908

POLICE PROHIBIT THE
POPULAR BARN DANCE.

As It's Presented in North End Halls
It Shocks Moral Guardians.
"Cut It Out," They Say.

Whew! The police object to the popular barn dance and have put the ban on it in Kansas City. They do not consider it up to the moral standard of what should take place in a well regulated ball room. The officers who tightened the lid on the barn dance refused to say what their private opinion of the dance was after having watched an exhibition given for their personal benefit.
Acting under orders from Captain Walter Whitsett, two plain clothes men, Ben Goode and John McCall, went to a hall in Campbell street last Wednesday evening and informed the members of a dancing party there that they would not be allowed to dance the barn dance. The merry young people strenuously objected to police interference, and the officers were the recipients of all kinds of dire threats.
A party of the young people pleaded that the dance was "perfectly" proper and "lovely," and went through one turn of the hall to show the officers really what the barn dance was. The hard-hearted officers, however, remembered that stern duty called to them and refused to allow the pleading of the pretty young misses to sidetrack them from their duty.
Not to be outdone by the big captain in regulating the social events and amusements of the city, Sergeant Patrick Clark, also commanding the North End social pink teas, sent Sergeant E. McNamara to the hall and had the lights turned out. The people residing in the vicinity of the hall complained to the police that they were unable to sleep whenever the hall was used for dances. The music was too loud for the sleepers and the shrill laughs and giggles of the young ladies got on the nerves of the men who were compelled to stay at home with their wives and take care of the fretful babies.
Whether the hall will be opened for dancing in the future the police refused to say, but they were confident that the barn dance would not be danced there again.

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June 8, 1908

MONEY IN BANK; STARVED.

End Comes to Woman Who Existed
on Crackers and Water.

After having lived on "crackers and water and the power of God" for a week, Miss Kate Thuey, found in a precarious condition in her room at 722 Campbell street, Saturday afternoon, died at the general hospital yesterday afternoon at 1 o'clock. Miss Thuey was in a dying condition when taken into the hospital and she steadily grew worse. Dr. G. B. Thompson, coroner, pronounced her death due to starvation and kidney trouble. In her stomach there was found a quantity of undigested crackers and nothing more.

Miss Thuey has two sisters living in this city, Mrs. John Owens, 2601 Independence avenue, and Mrs. Lucy Mahoney of Twenty-fifth street and Prospect avenue. These sisters had lost trace of her some years ago. At that time she began to appear dissatisfied with her home life and would have nothing to do with her family. After she let home she kept in communication with her sisters and family for a few months only . Mrs. Owens said she had done everything to find out her sister's whereabouts but was unable to.

The first they heard of her for five years was the account of her demented condition in yesterday's Journal. Mrs. Owens told the coroner that at all times her sister and herself had been anxious to help Miss Thuey, but that she consistently refused to accept any aid. It was said that she is supposed to have about $3,000 in a bank in Kansas city, that sum being her share of her father's estate. This has not been ascertained as a fact; the abject state of poverty in which the woman was found by the police would not substantiate the theory.

The sisters of Miss Thuey put forward the theory that in her demented state the woman had become a miser and was hording away her meager earnings.

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June 7, 1908

AGED WOMAN FOUND
STARVING BY POLICE.

CRACKERS AND WATER HER
SOLE DIET FOR DAYS.

Feebly Resists Being Taken From
Bare Room and Begs for Her
Slender Larder -- Taken to
General Hospital.

While investigation curious noises, which came from the rear of 722 Campbell street yesterday afternoon George Brooks and James Malloy, policemen, discovered an old woman wrapped tightly in two torn and soiled sheets, lying on the floor of the room. It was from this woman, Miss Kate Thuey, that the sounds came, which had attracted the attention of neighbors for the past week.

As the police entered the room they heard the woman repeat over and over: "Crackers and water and the power of God." Too weak to rise, the woman had placed a box of crackers and a large can of water withing her reach. Crackers and water with the power of God were all that had sustained her and kept body and soul together for the past week, according to her statement.

The police aided her to her feet, and the old sheets dropped away displaying the emaciated form. In her demented condition caused from long sickness and privation, the woman tried weakly to fight the police away from her, saying that she wanted to be alone. She was too weak and her struggles so exhausted her that she fell to the floor again.

Seeing her pitiful condition, the officers called the ambulance from the Walnut street police station and she was taken to the general hospital. When the officers had placed her on the stretcher to take her to the ambulance, the demented woman pleaded urgently for her box of crackers and can of water.

The officers tried to explain that they were going to take her to a place where she could have plenty of substantial food and drink. Nothing would satisfy her, however, until the officers had brought her musty crackers and a pail stale water to her. Guarding them closely she said nothing more, even after being taken to the hospital.

When the hospital authorities questioned her she would say nothing except to repeat over and over again her raving of "crackers and water and the power of God."

The neighbors at 722 Campbell street said last night that the old woman had always kept to herself and did not care to make friends or receive help from any of them. Every morning it had been her custom to leave her dingy little room in the rear of the flat and go out, apparently to work. In the evening she would return and nothing more was seen of her until next morning.

Last Sunday evening she was seen to come home and from that time until yesterday she was lost trace of. The neighbors tried to get in her room, fearing that she had come to some harm, but the door was locked. Yesterday they heard the noises coming from her room which sounded like groans, and so they notified police.

The hospital physicians say that Miss Thuey is in a dangerous condition due to the lack of food. Whether her demented state was caused by her privation or not, they are unable to tell. Good food and absolute rest, they say, are all that can possible effect a cure in her case.

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April 14, 1908

BURNED CHILDREN WITH ACID.

Boys Rubbed It on Their Faces, Caus-
ing Them Much Pain.

Four boys, living in the neighborhood of Fourteenth and Campbell streets, last night took a bottle of carbolic acid and a medicine syringe and spread terror among the girls and smaller children of that section. An alarm reached No. 4 police station and Patrolman T. M. Scott captured one of the boys, Tony Hanson, 1320 Campbell street. His is 11 years old and his companions were about the same age. The names of the others said to have taken part were Chester Cheney, 910 East Fourteenth street; Harry Wintermute, 912 East Fourteenth street and Chester Northfleet, 914 East Fourteenth street.

The boys claimed they secured the bottle in or behind a barn and that they did not know what it contained. Many children were burned by the acid. While one boy used the medicine syringe the others, it is said, would saturate pieces of rag and rub the necks and faces of children they could catch. Ugly burns and much pain followed. Lieutenant Hammil in charge of No. 4 police station did not want to place boys so young in the holdover, so he merely left their names, addresses and other information for Captain Flahive to act upon as he chooses today. Some of the children who were most burned are Florence David, 1431 Campbell street; Winnie Austin, 914 East Fourteenth street, and Edna Barnes, 1425 Campbell street.

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April 10, 1908

KYLE FINES WIFE
BEATERS HEAVILY.

TWO MUST SPEND YEAR EACH IN
THE WORKHOUSE.

A Pickpocket and the Assailant of a
Little Girl Are Fined $500 Each,
Also -- Lecture to Heavy-
Handed Husband.

Judge Kyle celebrated re-election yesterday by assessing four $500 fines, two of them being against wife beaters, one a pickpocket and the fourth a man who had attempted to assault a little girl. It was the judge's first day on the bench since election.

W. D. Russell, 2223 Campbell street, was fined $500 for beating his wife and putting her, with a 3-weeks-old baby in her arms, out of the house. Mrs. Russell's mother was also put out.

When Patrolman Noland was called he tried to effect a compromise. He told Mrs. Russell to go back into the house and see what Russell would do. Russell had gone to bed intoxicated, the officer said, and immediately began to curse and abuse his wife when she awakened him.

Mrs. A. Burgis of the Associated Charities said that Mrs. Russell had supported herself and baby, and husband, too, for a long time by making bed quilts, having made and sold twenty of them. When Russell insisted that he had paid the rent Mrs. Burgis said: "Not much you didn't. We paid part and your wife the rest." Russell is a big, strapping man and his wife a small woman. She was too weak and sickly to appear in court, but the officer and Mrs. Burgis did the work. His fine was $500.

The next wife beater to meet his fate was Fred Scraper of 313 East Eighteenth street. He was arrested by Patrolman McCarthy after he had raised a disturbance at his home. Mrs. Scraper and her little daughter both testified against Scraper.

"My wife irritates me," Scraper said. "The other night I went home with the earache and the toothache. Any man might slap a woman at such times."

"There is no excuse on earth great enough to cause a husband to lay even his hand upon his wife in anger. Your fine is $500," said Judge Kyle. Scraper was fined $15 on March 10 for disturbing the peace at home and given a stay conditioned on good behavior. He has been in police court many times for the same offense. He is an upholsterer's solicitor.

When Philip Packard was arraigned on a technical charge of vagrancy Sergeant James W. Hogan testified that on election night in a crowd in front of a newspaper office he had caught Packard in the act of picking a man's pocket. Bertillon records show that Packard had served a term in the penitentiary at Pontiac, Ill., and many workhouse sentences. He did not deny it. On December 21 last, under the name of Milton Steele, Packard was sent to the workhouse for attempting to pick a man's pocket in a pool hall. He was released April 1. Judge Kyle assessed $500 against Packard.

A man giving the name of J. H. McCleary, a news agent, was the last victim. He was charged with disturbing the peace. George W. Banfield, a contractor of Twenty-ninth and Flora, told how his little girl had been insulted by McCleary. Some little girls were hunting four-leaf clovers in old Troost park. When McCleary placed his hands on Mr. Banfield's daughter the girls ran and screamed. Banfield chased McCleary several blocks, caught him and turned him over to the police. McCleary was fined $500.

All four of the men fined $500 rode to the workhouse, no attempts being made to get them out on appeal bonds. The fine means one year in the workhouse.

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January 30, 1908

BABY LOST NEAR HOME.

Lela Weldon Enjoyed Her Ride to the
Police Station.

A little girl, almost a baby, pushing an empty go-cart up and down Holmes, Charlotte, and Campbell streets in the vicinity of Fifth street late yesterday afternoon attracted some attention. The little one seemed to be in search of some place, but she kept steadily on, asking no questions.

After two hours of tiresome walking the tot pulled up at a grocery store at Fifth and Holmes streets and announced that she had "lost her mamma and home." She was given a cracker box to rest upon while the police were notified. The tired little one was carried to police headquarters and place in charge of Mrs. Joan Moran, matron.

About 7 o'clock the child's mother, Mrs. J. J. Pearson, 740 Locust street, called for her. She said the baby's name is Lela Neeley Weldon.

"I sent her about a block away for the baby buggy," the mother said, "and when she came out of the house she turned the wrong way. Then she got lost and began to wander about trying to find her home."

It was said by persons who saw little Lela that she was often within a half block of her home. She has lived here but six weeks, coming here with her parents from St. Louis. Most children howl like the Indians when taken in charge by the police, but Lela said she like the ride to the station on the "treet tar."

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January 17, 1907

LIVE WIRE CREATES A FURORE.

Endangers Lives as It Swings in
Street at Eighth and McGee.

Fast running under a circuit breaker caused a break in the trolley wire at Eighth and McGee streets last night. This was followed by a brilliant electrical display as the fallen wire touched the trucks, and a heavy roar which almost deafened those who were passing in the street at that time.

A policeman who was walking on Grand avenue near Ninth street hurried in the direction of the flashes, thinking that a bomb had been thrown at the post office building. Persons as far away as Eighth and Campbell streets saw the electrical display and heard the reports which the wire made as it swung back and forth over the tracks. Persons walking on Eighth street near the break at the time flagged the cars, and also passersby who started to walk across the street.

The wire was broken by the trolley pole of an eastbound Independence avenue car, which passed under the circuit breaker so rapidly that it jerked the wire from its hangings. The car passed on with undiminished speed, the crew not seeming to realize that a death-trap had been left behind unguarded. A Metropolitan division superintendent was summoned and soon captured the live wire, allowing the blockaded cars to drift under the gap and continue on their way.

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January 9, 1908

OPERATION TO SAVE
A YOUTH'S MIND

PART OF CLYDE TURNER'S SKULL
IS CUT AWAY.

Butted His Head Agasint the Wall
When a Child and Was
Becoming Viciously
Insane. May Be
Cured.

Clyde Turner, a 15-year-old lad, a ward of the children's court, a portion of whose skull was removed Tuesday afternoon with the idea that he might, by the operation, grow up to be a good and bright boy, was reported last night by the Post Graduate hospital, Independence avenue and Campbell street, where the operation was performed, as doing well.

Clyde's case is the first of the sort in the history of the Kansas City children's court, and the second or third in the court history of the United States. Some years ago a lad in Philadelphia was trephined to cure bad habits, and there was a somewhat similar, but not exactly parallel, case in Omaha recently. Six months ago the Kansas City children's court removed Dewey Marcuvitz's tonsils to mend his ways, but the operation was only partially successful.

PRESSED DOWN BRAIN.

The lad who now lies on a cot at the Post Graduate hospital with a piece of his skull the size of a teacup taken away, has had an unfortunate life. His parents died when he was a month old and he was adopted by George Pack, an employe of the Kansas City Bold and Nut Compnay of Sheffield, who lives at Hocker and Sea streets in Independence. The baby Clyde had a habit of butting his head against the wall whenever he was vexed. Efforts were made to break him of this, but he was not cured until he had flattened the crown of his head.

He grew up "simple," and when 12 years old was sent to the Missouri colony for the feeble-minded in Marshall, Mo. He seemed to improve there, and was released about a year ago. He did not get along very well with his foster parents, although they treated him as they would their own son. Two weeks ago, according to the story told by Mrs. Pack in the children's court, a week ago last Monday, Clyde made an attack on her husband's mother with a butcher knife, and as he is a big, strong boy, might have killed her, had it not been for interference. The lad was confined in the detention home from that time until Tuesday morning, when he was taken to the hospital.


Dr. E. G. Blair, assisted by Dr. John Punton, performed the operation. The portion of his skull, which was flattened, was sawed out and thrown away. The brain, which had been pressed down, rose to fill the cavity. The lad will remain in the hospital until nature grows a cartilage across the aperture.

When the boy awoke yesterday morning he seemed very happy. He was a sour-faced, frightened lad when he came to the place. His eyes wore that pathetic, timid, hunted expression of those who are not mentally normal. But when he awoke his eyes were bright. He smiled and said: "I feel awful good!"

THE BOY CONSENTED.

Judge H. L. McCune of the children's court said last evening in regard to the case:

"It was a question of the court's permitting the lad to become permanently insane, for his spells rising out of the sullenness into passionate outbreaks such as he made on his foster father's mother, were growing more and more frequent, or having him operated upon with a slight chance of death but a much larger chance of recovery and development into a bright and useful man. The doctors told me there was absolutely no chance for the boy to recover without the operation. The court received the consent of his foster parents and of the boy himself.

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January 8, 1907

MANY OBJECT TO PLAYGROUNDS.

Some Say They're to Be Too Near
Railroad Yards.

Many property owners east of Main Street, north of Independence avenue and west of Highland are contemplating a petition to the board of park commissioners to protest against two sites said to have been chosen as playgrounds. A committee selected for the purpose reported Monday that it would recommend two sites, one bounded by Tracy and Lydia avenues, Second and Third streets, and another bounded by Gilliss, Campbell, Third and Fifth streets. The former is said to have been selected for a playground for negroes.

Many of the residents in the districts adjacent are complaining as they say both sites are too close to the railroad tracks. They claim that boys will be constantly tempted to "hop trains."

Property owners in the space bounded by and Forest avenues, Missouri avenue and Pacific street are the biggest objectors. A petition probably will be started in that neighborhood today.

"Twice this block has been selected by a committee," said a property owner in that block yesterday. "At least that was published and it gave rise to the report that our property was to be condemned for park or playground purposed. Many of us had sales consumated, even to the point of a deposit being made. No one would buy our property with the condemnation proceedings staring them in the face."

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November 25, 1907

ROB A PREACHER

HOME OF REV. E. R. WOODRUFF
VISITED BY BURGLAR.
STOLE COMMUNION SERVICE

ALSO A LOT OF THE FAMILY SILVERWARE.

While the Rector Was Attending a
Birthday Party Loot to the
Value of $1,777 Was
Carried Away.

The home of the Rev. E. B. Woodruff, rector of St. George's Church Episcopalian, Thirty-second and Troost, was entered by a burglar Saturday night while the pastor and his family attended a birthday supper party. The Rev. Mr. Woodruff lives at 3228 Campbell street. He worked in his study until nearly 6 o'clock on yesterday's sermon, "Gather in the Fragments that Remain." Then the family left for the home of J. H. Cunningham, 4118 Wabash avenue.

Soon after the family departed from the house the burglar entered. He at once turned the rectors study into a clearing house for family plate and church communion service. He first filled the rector's empty cigar case with some of the rector's choice stogies and then he arranged the silverware, along with the cigars, that he might select what he wished. The burglar selected the plate with care, casting away a dozen silver spoons.


SUIT CASE FULL OF BOOTY.

Then the burglar gathered in the fragments that remained and packed them away in the rector's suit case. The suit case would not hold over $1,000 worth of silverware, and a red laundry bag was selected to behold the balance. The entire value of the ware he selected was valued about $1,777. With $83.20 in money which he found in the study the burglar went downstairs.

It was past midnight when the rector and his family came home. The screen door was ajar and this Rev. Woodruff at once detected that a "jimmie" had been used on his front door. While the rector lighted the house his wife hurried to an upstairs closet where the silver chest was kept. The chest was missing, and Mrs. Woodruff then ran into her husband's study. There she found the chest and saw the rejected spoons along the floor. She called and Rev. Woodruff hurried to her. Hardly had he reached his study when he heard tapping below, and realized that his entrapped burglar was just making his escape from the house.


THE SERMON GOES ON.

"I just don't see how I can preach on the subject selected," said the rector after the robbery. He did, nevertheless, taking his text from the gospel of St. John, sixth chapter, twelfth verse.

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September 25, 1907

DISLIKES IDEAL LIFE.

Alta Reaves, at 18, Deserts
Her Aunt's Home.
Alta Reaves, Missing 18-year-old.
ALTA REAVES.
Disappearance of Girl 18 Years Old Causing
an Aunt Much Distress.
Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 21, 1907
My Dear Aunt Marcia: By the time you get this I will be clear away from Kansas City. I suppose you will be surprised, but I have been thinking for some time and have come to the conclusion that I simply cannot live up to your ideal of life. I know that I have caused you a great deal of trouble and have decided not to be a cause for more. I thank you very, very much for all that you have done for me and I can probably never repay you for it; but some day I will show you that I do appreciate what you have done for me.

Please don't worry about me, for you have heard that "God helps those who help themselves," and I am not only going to try, but I am going to do it. I don't feel at all afraid of anything.

I hate to leave you, Aunt Bitha, and all the folks, but I have decided that if I am ever going to do anything, now is the time. If you want to do any more for me, just pray for me.

Again thanking you for all your kindness to me I am,

Your loving niece -- ALTA. P. S. -- I would have told you that I was going and where, but I knew that you would not let me go.
When Miss Marcia Jennings, a public stenographer at 302 R. A. Long building, reached her home 608 East Thirtieth street, late Saturday evening she found the foregoing letter awaiting her. It was from her niece, Alta Reaves, and was typewritten on the paper of the Western Pump and Manufacturing Company, Ninth and Wyandotte streets, where she worked until that day. She was 18 years old July 26. She comes of one of the best families in Clay county. Her father died when she was 2 years old and her mother when she was 8. Since that time she has been reared by two aunts, Mrs. C. H. Scott, of Excelsior Springs, Mo., and Miss Marcia Jennings, of this city. Four years ago she came here and since then has been continually with Miss Jennings, who sent her to school and later educated her as a stenographer.


DISAPPEARANCE A MYSTERY.

"I can assign no reason on earth for Alta's leaving in this manner," said Miss Jennings yesterday. "She has only recently attained her majority but has never yet kept company with young men. I am confident, however, that someone is behind this resolve of hers and that she had help in leaving."

About 4:30 Saturday afternoon Miss Alta called up her aunt and asked if she had to get anything for supper. She was told to take home some meat. She made a purchase and arrived at home about 5 o'clock. The meat was found in the ice box. She was last seen about 5:30, when she returned a book to a neighbor, but said nothing about leaving.

"The girl had no suitcase," said the aunt, "but she packed clothing for the trip that I know it would take two to carry. She must have left by the rear entrance, as had she gone any other way she would surely have been seen. She is a very strong-minded girl and may have come to the conclusion that she could do better alone, I feel sure that someone has induced her to run away. Furthermore, I do not believe that she is out of this city. She didn't have money enough to get very far."


THREATENED TO LEAVE BEFORE.

When Miss Jennings returned home on Labor day she found that Miss Alta had packed her trunk and ordered an expressman to remove it to 1023 Campbell street, where she had engaged a room. It was her intention then to live there and take her meals in restaurants down-town. The aunt frustrated her plans and thought that the girl had become reconciled to live with her. She was to have taken a new and better position yesterday.

After finding the girl gone, Miss Jennings called the police and asked their assistance in locating the missing girl. Miss Alta is said to be an exceptionally attractive girl, 18 years old, 5 feet, 3 inches tall and weighing 130 pounds. She is a decided blonde, ans light blue eyes and naturally rosy cheeks. When last seen she wore a white shirtwaist, with a tan skirt, which hangs a little below her shoetops. A large white hat trimmed with cream roses topped off her toilet.

Miss Jennings is greatly worried over the girl's disappearance and her relatives in Clay county are nearly distracted over it. The police are doing all they can to locate the girl.

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September 24, 1907

WOMAN SUES A PRIEST

ASKS $50,000 FROM FATHER ED-
WARD P. FITZGERALD.

He is Assistant Pastor of St. Mary's
Church, Independence, and Com-
plaintant Is Mrs. Beatrice M.
Sotomayor.

Edward P. Fitzgerald, assistant pastor of St. Mary's Catholic church in Independence, was sued for $50,000 damages yesterday in the circuit court at Kansas City by Mrs. Beatrice M. Sotomayor, a Spanish woman. She has charge of the nurses' quarters at the University hospital, 1005 Campbell street. Mrs. Sotomayor alleges that the priest slapped her on the evening of June 9, 1907, at the parish house in Independence. Both Mrs. Sotomayor and the priest last night refused to be interviewed.

Mrs. Sotomayor, in her petition, says that ever since she came to Kansas City seven years ago, she has been a frequent visitor at the convent conducted by the Sisters of Mercy adjoining St. Mary's church and the parish house in Independence, and that she has always been on friendly terms with the sisters.

Some old quarrel, about which both the priest and Mrs. Sotomayor refuse to talk, came up for discussion at the convent on the evening of June 9, and the sister urged Mrs. Sotomayor, so she asserts in her petition, to go the the priest and apologize. The petition then goes on to recite that after she knocked at the door of the parish house, Father Fitzgerald invited her into the house, shut the door and told her that the only way she would be forgiven was to permit him to throw over her a white sheet, put a bell around her neck and lead her into the church where a large congregation was assembled and be shown to the church."

She refused to do this, the petition cites, but offered to go before the sisters and ask forgiveness. Then, asserts the woman, "he became angry and commanded her to go down upon her knees before him." This, she says, she refused to do, and then, she alleges, he struck her on both cheeks with his hand.

Mrs. Sotomayor was born in Spain, but has lived most of her life in Mexico. She came to Kansas City seven years ago and for a time gave private lessons in Spanish. For the past four years she has been at the University hospital, in charge of the nurses' quarters. She is a little woman, not over five feet three inches in height, with jet black hair and eyes. She talks with a Spanish accent. She appears to be about 40 years of age.

"I have not read the allegations made by Mrs. Sotomayor in the suit she has brought against me, and at this time I prefer to make no statement," said Rev. Edward Fitzgerald. He has been pastor of St. Mary's church for three months. The priest makes his home at that of the vicar general, Rev. Father Thomas Fitzgerald, but they are not related.

Vicar General Fitzgerald said that personally he knew nothing of the assaults charged by the woman, whom he was disposed to believe was not responsible for all she says or does.

"I form this impression," said the vicar general, "from her peculiar actions of the past. She was a persistent visitor at the convent and seemed to be very much attached to one of the sisters. Mrs. Sotomayor had an apparently uncontrollable passion for visiting the convent during the class hours, and her presence had a demoralizing influence on the studies of the pupils. The annoyance eventually became intolerable, and orders were given that the woman should abandon her visits. If to enforce this order any violence was resorted to I am not aware of it, and I am disposed to believe that Mrs. Sotomayor is exaggerating the whole affair.

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September 23, 1907

DR. GEORGE HALLEY INJURED.

Also Miss Genevieve Turk, Who Was
Driving With Family.

Dr. George Halley, of 3540 Campbell street, was thrown from his carriage yesterday afternoon while driving down the steep hill of the extension to Spring Valley boulevard, sustaining a severely sprained ankle and numerous cuts and bruises on the head and shoulders. In the carriage with him were Mrs. Halley, their 12-year-old daughter, Eleanor, their 10-year-old niece, Dorothy Williamson, and Miss Genevieve M. Turk, a teacher in the Linwood school. Miss Turk's left wrist was broken. The other occupants of the carriage escaped unhurt.

Dr. Halley and Miss Turk were riding in the front seat of the carriage. In the rear were Mrs. Halley and the two little girls. In turning north from Valentine road and starting down the hill, the carriage ran against the horse. The animal took fright and overturned the vehicle, throwing it down the embankment on the west side of the road. Mrs. Halley and her niece succeeded in jumping out but the rest of the occupants went over with the carriage.

Dr. Halley has been in bad health for about a year.

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July 30, 1907

"UNLOADED GUN" AGAIN.

One Messenger Boy Shoots Another
in the Leg.

The gun that was believed to be unloaded got another victim last night. Ralph Roff and Kinsey Anderberg were in a restaurant at 205 West Eighth street, when Anderberg spied a 22 caliber target rifle that the cook had to kill rats.

"Is it loaded?" asked the boy.

"Naw," replied the cook, turning a pair of eggs.

Anderberg pulled the triger. Roff was taken to the emergency hospital with a bullet in his left leg. He lives at 1827 Cambpell street.

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March 26, 1907

BY GLANCING SHOT.

BULLET INTENDED FOR A NEGRO
REBOUNDS FROM A RIB.
INNOCENT BYSTANDER MAY DIE.

SERIOUSLY WOUNDED BEFORE
MISSILE HAD SPENT FORCE.
Intended Victim Almost Unharmed, While
Man Who Stood Near Has Only
Slight Chance for Recover --
Because Dishes Were
Not Washed.

A bullet fired by Andrew Johnson, a negro, last night at 814 Independence avenue, pierced the side of Edward Maymon, another negro, and struck Morris Hieth, a white man, in the abdomen. Hieth may die. The shooting took place in the general store off Jacob Louis, Hieth's brother-in-law. Hieth was taken at once to the emergency hospital, where Dr. W. A. Shelton made an examination and discovered that the bullet had penetrated the intestines. The injured man was later operated upon by Dr. St. Elmo Sanders at the General hospital. Maymon went to his home, 548 Campbell street, after being treated and said he didn't intend to lose a day's work.

Maymon runs a rooming house at 548 Campbell street. Johnson and his wife room there. Maymon has several roomers and only one kitchen, which each person is supposed to clean up after it has been used.

"When Johnson and his wife go t through using it tonight," said Maymon, "they left all the utensils dirty. I spoke to him about it and told him the place must be left clean. He got mad, one word led to another and he left, saying he would 'get' me.

"In a few minutes I went up on Independence avenue to get an officer and met Johnson. I knew from the way he acted that he had a pistol, so, when I got close enough to him, I knocked him down twice. Just then a wagon drove between us or I would have taken his weapon away. In front of Louis' store he shot at me, but the bullet went wild. I ran into the store and he started up the street, but came back, walked into the store and shot me. I felt the bullet pierce my side and heard a man behind me say, 'Gott im Himmel. I'm shot.' I left and went home."

H. M. Green, 631 Campbell street, was a witness to the street fight preceding the shooting and also the shooting. He said had the wagon not separated the men Maymon would have bested Johnson and there would have been no casualties.

Jack Spillane, a former police officer, was on Independence avenue near the scene. He saw Johnson, revolver in hand, as he ran out of Louis' store east to Campbell street and north on Campbell street. Spillane chased Johnson for two blocks and fired two shots at him, but neither is believed to have taken effect. Johnson ran through a saloon at Fifth and Campbell streets and disappeared.

Jacob Louis, owner of the store at 814 Independence avenue, is a brother-in-law of the injured man. Hieth is a laborer, works for the Santa Fe railway and has eight children. He has been here only eight months, coming from Russia. Hieth and his family live over the store in which he was shot.

"Heith was standing on the east side of the door facing south when the negro ran in after a shot had been fired," said Mr. Louis. "We thought it was all over when the other man returned. He entered the door with his revolver drawn and when within ten feet of his victim, shot at him. Hieth was standing a little behind and to one side of the negro who was shot. He dropped to the floor and said: 'Gott im Himmel. I'm shot.' and immediately became unconscious. The negro, Maymon, walked out as if nothing was the matter."

The bullet pierced Maymon's left side, striking the tenth rib and making only a superficial would. The holes where the bullet entered and came out are about three inches apart. The same bullet then glanced off and struck Hieth. Probing failed to locate the bullet.

George Martin, a negro who rooms at Maymon's house, heard the first quarrel in the yard and heard Johnson say he was going after a revolver. "He was gone about twenty minutes," said Martin. "I think he must have gone down town or some place else after the gun. When he came back he had it and said he was going to kill Maymon. He went into the house looking for him and I advised him to go to bed but he seemed bent on murder."

Johnson is a tall, brown skinned negro. He wore a black soft hat and a light overcoat when he disappeared after the shooting. Up to a late hour last night he had not been captured.

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