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February 10, 1910

KLING AT MERCY
OF COMMISSION.

Fans Fear Supreme Body in
Baseball Will Make an
Example of Him.

Will the national commission establish a precedent in organized baseball by rendering a decision unfavorable to Johnny Kling, local billiard man and Cub holdout now on the blacklist, who has applied for readmission to the fold? This is a question that is bothering the fans and judging from talk in baseball circles, the one-time Cub star is certain to encounter rough sledding before he lands back in good standing minus the black mark which now bedecks his name in the records of the court ruled over by Garry Herrmann.

The fat that the national commission is without opposition in the world of baseball at the present time makes it appear certain that it will make use of its authority when the time comes to pass upon the Kling case. Up to this year there existed on the Pacific coast the "outlaw" league, which seriously hampered the work of the commission, and a practice of granting concessions to players who had kicked the traces was followed by those in charge of the affairs of organized baseball.

This was exemplified in the case of Hal Chase, who committed a most flagrant offense by jumping from the New York Americans to the California League, only to be restored to good standing a short time after, none the worse for his rash act. This was done with the one hope of eventually wearing down the opposition to the national agreement and finally proved effectual, as last fall the "outlaws" were taken into the fold, leaving the jurisdiction of the great national game under one tribunal, the national commission.

COMPARE CASE WITH OTHERS.

"Since Kling sent in his request to Garry Herrmann for a consideration of his case with the purpose of seeking the good graces of the high tribunal, stories have sprung up regarding the Chase and Mike Kelley incidents in which the commission fought a losing battle. Chase was out on a charge of contract jumping in the middle of the 1908 season, when he left the Highlanders to play with the California outlaw league. Mike Kelley was in the same boat as Kling at the present time, and his restoration was due more to an error of the St. Louis club than anything else. Kelley refused to report to the St. Louis American in 1905, and as a result was kept out of organized baseball for two seasons, returning when the Mound City club failed to place his name on the reserve list through oversight, practically relinquishing claim to him.

In the face of these two verdicts, principally, it has been stated that the commission is hardly liable to turn around and refuse concessions to Kling that were granted to the others. Conditions have changed since then, however, and apparently this has been overlooked, as the national agreement is now absolute and its power, and for this reason the commission will no longer be forced to take a conciliatory attitude towards violators of the rules that govern baseball.

COMMISSION'S POWER ABSOLUTE.

In the event of Kling being turned down in his request for reinstatement, it will be the first case of this nature in which the commission has won out, due to the fact that opposition to organized ball is a thing of the past, and the trio now headed by Garry Herrman are in a position to govern, absolutely without the wayward players having "outlaw" leagues to fall back upon.

The fate of Kling will probably be known February 23. Mystery surrounds the purpose of the gathering, as Herrmann failed to state anything in detail, but it is taken to mean that the application of Kling will be the principal business to come up for disposal.

The date of the meeting is four days before the departure of the Club squad on their spring training trip to New Orleans and in the event of the commission giving out a decision of the case Kling would know his fate in time to prepare to accompany his old teammates, provided the act of the commission is favorable. There is a possibility, however, of the supreme court of baseball acting upon the case and then withholding their final decision until near the opening of the season.

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January 27, 1910

TEACHER ALSO BALL PLAYER.

Banquet for Dr. Gill, Candidate for
White Sox Berth.

Twenty-one members of the Kansas City chapter, Delta Sigma Delta, the members being students at the Kansas City dental college, gave a banquet last night to Dr. Warren Gill, a faculty member, at the Sexton hotel. In a short time Dr. Gill will leave for California to begin practice with the Chicago White Sox, in which team he is a candidate for first baseman. Dr. Gill is well known in baseball. He was first baseman for Minneapolis last season.

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January 25, 1910

RHEINSTROMS HERE TODAY.
Cincinnati Heir and Music Hall Bride
on the Way to the Coast.

CINCINNATI, Jan. 24. -- Harry A. Rheinstrom and his bride, who was Miss Edna Loftus, an English music hall beauty, will spend Tuesday in Kansas city. They left Cincinnati this morning and spent today in Chicago. They say they are making a "stop-by-the-wayside" trip to Los Angeles and that they are going to see all of the country they can before they reach there. This is the reason given by Rheinstrom for lingering in many cities on the way to the Southwest. The family affairs of the young millionaire have been adjusted amicably and his mother is said to have asked that he take his music hall bride to Los Angeles and live there.

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January 18, 1910

IN WAY, MAJOR'S
WIFE GETS DECREE.

Told She Hindered His Army
Progress, Returns From
Islands for Divorce.

When Mrs. Ruby B. Rutherford returned to the Philippines after a visit with her mother at Columbia, Mo., her husband, who is a major in the army, met her at the boat and frankly told her he was sorry she came back to hinder his progress as an ambitions officer. Mrs. Rutherford lost no time in returning to "the States." Yesterday a divorce was granted her by Judge Seehorn in the circuit court.

Mrs. Rutherford lives at the Brunswick hotel, at Eleventh street and Broadway. She introduced as character witness her brother, C. P. Bowling, cashier of the Exchange bank of Columbia, and Judge James E. Goodrich of the circuit court. Her daughter, Dorothy, aged 9 years, was not in court.

CALLS HIM INSOLENT.

The Rutherfords had domestic trouble before they went to the islands, and Mrs. Shepherd, wife of a captain, who often visited them at the Presidio, San Francisco, was a witness. Major Rutherford, she said, was insolent.

Mrs. Rutherford said most of her trouble had been at the Presidio, although she said the major stayed out nights after they went to the Philippines and was sorry when she returned to him after visiting at home.

A highball incident when Mrs. Rutherford gave a party at the Presidio was told in court. She said they ran out of whisky. She thought they had had enough, any way.

ANOTHER BOTTLE GOTTEN.

Another officer insisted, Mrs. Rutherford said, in going out for one more bottle. When he returned Mrs. Rutherford had her highball made "light," and Major Rutherford was angry because it wasn't the same strength as the drinks served the guests.

"When I insisted on a light drink," said Mrs. Rutherford, "my husband became angry because I did not drink as fast as he thought I should and he came and pured whisky into my glass until it ran all over me."

Mrs. Rutherford testified that while she liked to have a clean, neat house her husband, in his insolent manner, always made fun of her tidiness.

PUT FEET ON TABLE.

One of his delights, she said, was to finish his meal before his wife and then "rear" back in his chair and put his feet on the table.

When Major Rutherford, the wife testified, told her she was a "drawback," that she hindered his progress in the army and that he was downright sorry to see her back again, she left him, determined to sue for divorce.

Major Rutherford is connected with the medical corps and has an income of $4,000 yearly. They were married at Columbia, Mo., January 10, 1900, and Mrs. Rutherford left him February 14, 1909.

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December 14, 1910

DR. NEAL'S BROTHER HURT.

Physician, Called to West, Quits
Hospital Place at Once.

Dr. J. Park Neal, house surgeon at the general hospital, left last night for Los Angeles, Cal., in answer to a telegram that his brother-in-law, E. C. Briggs of Great Bend, Kas., had sustained a badly fractured leg. Dr. Neal, who has been house surgeon since the new hospital was built, tendered his resignation Tuesday, to take effect January 25. As most of the time between now and that time will be consumed in this trip, yesterday virtually was his last day at the hospital.

The position of house surgeon may be abolished. Most of the surgical work is done by visiting surgeons. Dr. Neal also held the position of assistant superintendent. It is not likely this office will be discontinued.

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January 6, 1910

JEU BING FLEES
FROM TONG WAR.

CHINESE BOY, ESCAPING FROM
FRISCO, SPENDS HOURS IN
KANSAS CITY.

Hides in Union Depot to
Evade Prying Enemies
of His Family.

So that he, at least, might escape the tong war in San Francisco in which an uncle has met death and in which his relatives are all involved, Jeu Bing, a Chinese boy, was spirited from the California city at night and with $500 in gold in his pocket was placed aboard a train for Chicago. His ticket called for a change of trains at Kansas City, and he spent a couple of hours yesterday morning in the Union depot. The boy has letters to several Chinese merchants of Chicago and it will rest with them as to whether he continues East or remains there. A price, it is said, has been placed on Jeu's head by the tong faction said to be responsible for the death of his uncle.

Jeu is 16 years old. He was born in San Francisco's Chiatown and was left motherless when a little child. The boy attended the Presbyterian Sunday school there and acquired the English language rapidly. With his knowledge of the Chinese tongue and his familiarity with the denizens of his section of the city he was frequently called on by the authorities as an interpreter. It was while engaged in some of these cases that he gained the enmity of influential Chinamen who were his father's rivals in business.

MARKED FOR DEATH.

After the earthquake, Jeu was constantly in demand. The authorities wanted information on the mysteries of the Chinese section. They thought that they could get it from Jeu. If they did, it is a secret, for Jeu declares that he knew nothing of the underground passages and the hovels and haunts of the criminal Chinese. After the restoration of Chinatown much of the blame for the activity of the authorities was laid to the Bing family.

Then came the tong wars. How his family were interested in these, Jeu could or would not say. It was sufficient that there was bad feeling, he said, and to make matters worse his uncle was one of those who was stabbed in the back one night. His body was found the next day. There was much excitement in the Chinese quarter. There were other assaults and the other members of the Bing family remained indoors. Two weeks ago a friend notified them that Jeu was one of the Chinamen on whose head a price had been put by one of the tongs.

Friendly Chinamen were called in consultation. The authorities, who were told of the threat, suggested that Jeu secure the names of some of the Chinamen suspected and they would be arrested. He was unable to do this, and at a friendly council it was decided to send Jeu away from the city.

DONNED WOMAN'S DRESS.

This was the hardest part of the programme. It was known that the house was under surveillance, and it was with difficulty that Jeu was spirited out. He was dressed in a woman's walking suit with a heavy veil, and in this costume made his way to the railroad depot, where a detective purchased his ticket. He had a purse containing $500 in gold, the most of which he brought to Kansas City with him.

Arriving here early yesterday morning, Jeu presented a note to Station master Bell. The latter escorted him to Matron Everingham, who made the boy comfortable and kept him out of sight until the time for departure of his train to Chicago. The boy feared that if his presence in the depot became known some Chinamen, enemies of his family, might telegraph to San Francisco and that members of the tong who were sworn to kill him would follow.

Jeu was an entertaining conversationalist and also a good quizzer. He asked hundreds of questions of the "red caps" as to the size of the city, the number of Chinese in the town and also expressed wonder that there was no Chinese quarter and no Chinese servants. He took the names of several who had been kind to him and said that he would send them a little token of his regard when he returned to San Francisco, which he hoped would be soon.

Jeu said that he was a nephew of Lee Bing, the deceased Chinese philanthropist of St. Louis. Over a score of members of the Bing family, he said, came to America about a quarter of a century ago. Many of them are dead, while some live in El Paso, Chicago and New York. The rest all live in San Francisco.

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January 3, 1910

INDEPENDENCE WAS
ONCE THE GATE CITY.

Pioneer Recalls the Days
Before the Railroad
Reached River.

Enchanting is the romance of the Golden West, the story of mountain and plain. Forming the most striking drama in American history, the record, alas, is but fragmentary -- the half has not been told. For, imperfectly have the annals been kept of the vast domain west of the Mississippi river from the time of early settlement to the present. Evidences of marvelous transformation are at hand, fruits of pioneer privations are enjoyed, but the annal of achievement in details has been neglected by historians. Reminiscences of early settlers can now alone supply the deficiency.

To a great extent has the history of Independence, Mo., to do with that of the West. This city was the scene of the initial step in the march of progress. Preparatory to crossing the desert, westward bound caravans procured supplies there. Frontiersmen, explorers and prospectors, returning home, brought to Independence the first news of discovery, for this city was then the greatest trading post in the West.

OUTFITTING POINT.

Prominent among the pioneers was Henry A. Schnepp, who is now a resident of Galesburg, Ill., but is now visiting his brother, David Schnepp, at the latter's home, 413 Whittier place. Mr. Schnepp was conspicuously identified with the early growth of Independence and lived there for fifteen years, leaving during the year 1890.

"In the early fifties Independence was the outfitting point for all the country west of the Missouri river and was the headquarters for frontiersmen," said Mr. Schnepp yesterday afternoon. "The paramount issue was to retain this lucrative trade and active measures were adopted with that end in view. This gave impetus to the construction of the first railroad in the West, which ran from the river to this city. A depot was built at Wayne City and a terminal established at the postoffice. The cars, which ran over wooden rails, were drawn by horses.

"Before the construction of the Hannibal & St. Joe Railway in1856 all transportation was by river. Apropos the recent agitating with regard to navigating the Missouri, it seems to me that as the river was navigable then, it should be now."

GOLD FOUND BY MISSOURIAN.

Mr. Schnepp staged through Iowa when that state was but sparsely settled. When he traveled along the Hawkeye frontier in 1854 the capital of that state was located at Iowa City and the territory west of Des Moines, the present capital, was inhabited almost exclusively by Indians.

"I could never forget the first overland mail route to Salt Lake City. The mail was carried by stage coach and the trip required many days under favorable weather conditions. The route extended from Independence to Westport, thence to Fort Riley, in Kansas; Fort Bridges, in Wyoming, and on to Salt Lake. The charge for carrying each letter was 25 cents, collectable on delivery. Prior to the establishment of the pony express in 1853-4, mail from the West was carried by a boat around Cape Horn."

Mr. Schnepp says that the gold fields of California were discovered by Joseph D. Childs, an uncle of C. C. Childs, an Independence banker. A contractor by profession, Joseph Childs was erecting a mill near Sacramento when workmen excavating a race found gold. This discovery started the rush to California, and Mr. Schnepp was one of the first to go for a fortune. He did not acquire fabulous wealth, but returned home with enough gold that he has not since been called a poor man.

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December 29, 1909

AEROPLANE BOWLS
OVER A CONSTABLE.

OFFICER GETS IN TRACK OF CUR-
TISS AIRSHIP AND PREVENTS
ITS DESTRUCTION.

Grabs Machine and Holds On,
Though Dragged for
Thirty Feet.

The several hundred people who attended the airship exhibition at Overland park yesterday afternoon and were treated to some genuine thrillers, and although Aviator Charles K. Hamilton succeeded in making only two flights in his Curtiss aeroplane, no one could complain because there was not enough excitement.

In his first attempt to fly Hamilton gave a pretty demonstration of the feasibility of the machine for aerial navigation until he tried to land in front of the grandstand. Just as the supporting wheels reached the ground a strong gust of wind caught the planes and despite the fact that the aviator had all the brakes on the machine fairly skidded across the field at a rate of about twenty miles an hour.

SAVES MACHINE; IS HURT.

It seemed inevitable that the aeroplane would crash into the grandstand and accomplish its own complete destruction, but Homer Breyfogle, constable of Johnson county, Kas., was standing near by and before he could get out of the way, the machine struck him and knocked him about fifteen feet. Officer George A. Lyons, a member of the motorcycle squad of the Kansas City police force, rushed to the rescue, but when he grabbed the swiftly moving machine he was hurled into the air and dragged to the ground. However, he "stayed with the ship" and was dragged fully twenty feet before the machine came to a standstill.

With the exception of a few bruises about the limbs, Officer Lyons was uninjured, but Constable Breyfogle sustained a painful cut on his neck and severe bruises on the face. Aviator Hamilton wrenched his foot in an effort to stop the airship.

HARD LUCK AGAIN.

The plane with which Breyfogle collided was so badly damaged that it required an hour to repair it, but at about 5 o'clock Hamilton was again soaring down the field majestically, and for a few seconds it appeared that he was at last to make a record-breaking trip, but after he had t raveled over a mile and was trying to turn for the homeward stretch, the engine suddenly stopped and the machine landed in a snowbank.

"I simply can't conquer that wind," said Hamilton after his last flight. "One can't imagine how strong this wind is until you get a few feet in the air and then it seems to be twice as fierce. It was all I could do just to keep the machine from capsizing just now, because the wind twisted me in every shape in a cyclone fashion. Dangerous business on a day like this, but I always hate to disappoint the crowds, and if there is any flying to be done, I'll do it no matter what kind of weather prevails.

"Aren't there too many trees and hay stacks around here to make aerial travel very safe?" asked a spectator.

HIGH WINDS HIS ENEMY.

"Yes, there isn't hardly enough room on this field, but if the wind would only go down for one day, I'd make some surprising flights. We may get some ideal weather yet. How's that? No, I don't imagine the North Pole district affords any desirable aviation fields. Anyway, we're not going to attempt any emulation of the Dr. Cook stunt. I am heading for sunny California, where I expect to carry off some prizes in the contests to be pulled off next month."

Hamilton will make the usual flights this afternoon at the park, and he promises to avoid any further attempted "assassinations" of police officers.

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December 27, 1909

DREAMS HER STRONG HOBBY.

Mrs. Virginia Gentry, Who Pre-
dicted Steamship Disaster, Is Here.

A woman who says she is the founder of a new sect called the Divine Scientist Healers and predicted the Vallencia disaster in San Francisco in 1906 recently arrived in this city and is living at 1327 Troost avenue. She is Mrs. Virginia Gentry, widow of the late Colonel R. T. Gentry, who commanded a regiment in General Price's army in Missouri and was well known in state politics a score of years ago.

"When my husband died three years ago he left an estate in this vicinity and I am here looking after it," said Mrs. Gentry. "I will probably reside here permanently.

"Most of the talk we hear of people being cured by the laying on of hands is rot. I think Madame Palladino is a faker and I doubt that she can do what she claims she can without pulling wires in one way or another. Maybe that is because her theory of life and things generally differs from mine. My strong hobby is dreams.

"The day before the Vallencia sailed on its fatal cruise I was in San Francisco with my late husband and the captain of the ship was our guest. He told me a dream he had about being stuck in the sand of a desert. Like a flash the inspiration came to me that it was all up with the captain and I told him so. He believed my warning and tried to be excused from the trip."

Mrs. Gentry has the Vallencia flag, an immense piece of woolen bunting. The captain had jokingly promised her that if his ship went down it should be hers and she obtained it from the steamship company by proving that she made the prediction that the good ship would come to grief.

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December 17, 1909

COURTESY SHOWN OLD AGE.

Santa Fe Has Sleeper Opened for
Old Couple's Comfort.

So that J. Bottomly, 90 years old, and his wife, 85 years old, would not have to wait about the Union depot, a sleeping car on which they had berths to California, over the Santa Fe railroad, was backed into the train shed and they were assisted to it an hour before the usual time last evening.

The couple are to spend their last days in Southern California. They have lived in Minneapolis, but recently doctors told their relatives that if the old folks desired to prolong their lives they would have to remove to a balmier climate. They arrived from Minneapolis via the Burlington road about 5 p. m. They were assisted into the depot, but the noise and drafts annoyed them.

Their train was not due to depart until 9:25 p. m., but attaches of the Santa Fe railroad thought of the special sleeper which is attached to the train here and had it backed into the train shed around 8 o'clock. The old couple were transferred to it.

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December 3, 1909

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
IN CONSULAR SERVICE.

LEON GOMEZ NOW COMES TO
KANSAS CITY.

In 24 Years He Has Found no City
That Suits Him Better and
He Would Like to Stay.
Acting Mexican Consular Leon Gomez.
LEON GOMEZ.

Leon Gomez, until recently stationed at Cagilari, Island of Sardinia, is the acting Mexican consul to this city, filling the office of M. E. Diebold, now at St. Louis. Mr. Gomez is commissioned as consul to St. Louis, but he said yesterday that in his twenty-four years of consular service he had found no city that suited him quite so well as Kansas City and that he hopes to be recommissioned here.

"A city of beautiful boulevards and avenues," he said. "What drives in the summer time! Not in Old Mexico or France or Italy is better to be found. If I can so arrange I will spend a few years here so as to give my family a rest. It will be good for them and me. We of the consular service are nomads, senor."

Personally, Mr. Gomez is of striking appearance. He is about 55 years old, short and well built. His iron gray hair is roached straight back from his forehead. The nose is Roman, the chin and cheekbones equally prominent.

In full dress uniform with his left breast covered with badges of high orders, his pictures (face views) might pass for that of General Diaz. This effect is considerable heightened by the heavy, drooping gray mustache and the absence of the chin whiskers which adorned his features up until a few weeks ago.

WOULD FILL A BOOK.

In keeping with his distinguished appearance is the new consul's experience in government affairs. Unlike the great president, who speaks none but his own tongue, Mr. Gomez is fluent in English, French and Italian, as well as Spanish.

A complete record of this Mexican's travels and experiences would fill a book. He was first appointed as consul to San Diego, Cal., from Guadalajara. After seven y ears there he was changed to Tuscon, A. T., for seven months, then to Panama for three years, back to California for three years, to Texas for a short time, to Belize or British Honduras for fourteen years, to Italy for a year and now to this point awaiting a post in St. Louis.

Mr. Gomez's diplomacy and education has made him a favorite wherever he has been stationed and his knowledge of languages, customs and laws of foreign countries seems to have kept him in good standing with the Diaz government. In 1894 he won a place in the international history as secretary of the international commission which established forever and beyond possible dispute of the boundary line between Mexico and the United States by planting a line of stone monuments from El Paso to the California coast.

On the subject of travel the new consul is an interesting talker, his knowledge of the countries where he has beeen stationed by his government being minute, even in statistics.

CONSIDERS IT UNWISE.

"Every people has its virtues," he says. "By the same token ever people has its faults that are peculiar and found nowhere else under the sun. If a man is to judge a country let him go to it and live five years, speak its language, follow its customs, obey its laws, eat, sleep and think with its inhabitants.

"The United States bids fair to be the greatest nation in the world because it is cosmopolitan. The most enterprising and energetic of all nations naturally migrate here because it is new and promising. Mexico -----"

But Mr. Gomez does not talk much about Mexico; it is more diplomatic not to draw comparisons. There are views which Mr. Gomez undoubtedly could express about his own country beside all others on the sphere, but he does not consider it wise apparently, saying instead:

"Mexico is a great country, too. Growing just like everything and destined sometime to be a power with the rest. It is great in territory, population and in national heart. It is rich in natural resources and its capitol has walks and drives rivaling those of Kansas City itself!"

It is commonly asserted that the fashionable parades of the City of Mexico are equal to those of Paris and the most beautiful on the continent, but Mr. Gomez would rather be excused from saying so in the United States.

"Always, everywhere, I say to the young man: 'Go to Mexico to live.' The people are warm in their hospitality toward strangers and there is money to be made. It is a big country. The laws are congenial and friendly to foreigners. The girls are -- ah, beautiful, senor. It is a most agreeable place in which to live and bring up a family. I say all this to them because it is true and because Mexico can stand a population as cosmopolitan as that of the United States."

With Mr. Gomez when he came here to Kansas City were his wife and three children, who have followed him about the map into all sorts of climates and among widely different kinds of people. They say they have enjoyed themselves everywhere they have been but like California the best.

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November 24, 1909

EMIGRANTS WILL MAKE WINE.

Party From France Stop in Kansas
City on Way to California.

From Bordeaux, France, to Southern California is the trip which a party of emigrants, headed by Jan D'Etinge, is making in the hope of finding a country where they will be able to use to advantage their knowledge of the culture of the grape for wine.

The party, consisting of eight adults and four children, stopped in the Union depot a short while last evening while waiting for the Santa Fe connection for California.

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November 12, 1909

JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS
COME TO TOWN TODAY.

COMMERCIAL CLUB ROOMS DEC-
ORATED FOR RECEPTION.

Five Women Members of Party Will
Be Guests of Honor at Country
Club Luncheon -- Omaha
the Next Stop.

Kansas City will be the host today to the Honorary Commissioners of Japan, consisting of forty-three of the leading business men and educators of the Oriental empire, who, together with five Japanese women, are touring the United States. No efforts will be spared to entertain the foreign guests during their stay here, which will be from 9 o'clock in the morning until 11 o'clock at night.

Following the arrival here the party will breakfast in their special train. At 9:30 the men of the party will be met in automobiles by the members of the Commercial Club and the next hour and a half will be spent in a reception in the club rooms. The club rooms have been decorated with palms and ferns, the stars and stripes, the Japanese national flag, the mikado's coat of arms, and the Japanese man-of-war emblem. Judge W. T. Bland, president of the club, will head the receiving line, and in it will be the forty-three Japanese commissioners, the officers off the Commercial Club and all former presidents of the club.

WILL VISIT HIGH SCHOOL.

At 11 o'clock the party will be taken to the Westport high school, where Baron Kanda, head of the school of the nobility in Tokio, will make a short speech. Baron Kanda speaks English fluently and is a graduate of Amherst college. The address will be followed by a drive through Swope park and a stop at the Evanston Golf Club for a buffet luncheon.

After the luncheon the party will be driven through the city, up and down the principal streets, over the boulevards and through the leading parks.

The first place of interest to be visited will be the Bank of Commerce. This will be followed by an inspection of the Burnham-Munger overall factory. A drive to Kansas City, Kas., is next in order, where the party will be shown through the plant of the Kingman-Moore Implement Company. These will be the only places visited during the day.

While the men are being entertained by the members of the Commercial Club the five women in the party, Baroness Shibusawa, Baroness Kanda, Madame Midzuno, Madame Horikoshi and Madame Toki will not be forgotten. A committee composed of the wives of the Commercial Club directors and Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Clendening will entertain them. A visit to the Westport high school, a noon lunch at the Country Club and a tea at the home of Mrs. W. R. Nelson will be the events of the day which have been mapped out for the women.

DINNER AT THE BALTIMORE.

At 6:30 o'clock in the evening a dinner will be served to the men in the banquet room at the Baltimore hotel. At the same time a dinner will be given for the women in the Japanese room of the hotel. At the conclusion of their dinner the women will repair to the banquet room, where the entire party will listen to the addresses by David R. Frances, Senator William Warner, Baron Shibusawa and Baron Kanda. Judge Bland will act as toastmaster.

This will conclude the events of the day. The visitors will be taken back to their train, and will leave for Omaha, from where they will work west to San Francisco, from which port they will sail for Japan, November 30.

LEADING FINANCIER.

The Japanese arrived in Seattle from Japan September 1, and when they leave will have spent eighty-eight days in America, visited fifty-two cities, and traveled more than 11,000 miles. During this time they have visited plants and institutions representing nearly every American industry. Many of Kansas City's leading industries will not be visited, as the party has been to similar ones in other cities.

Baron Elighi Shibusawa, who is the head of the commission, is one of the leading men of Japan, being both a statesman and a financier. His individual efforts have raised the status of business men in this country. In 1873, Baron Shibusawa organized the first national bank in Japan under the capital stock system, and has been connected since with all leading banking institutions in Japan.

One Pullman dynamo car, a baggage car, a Pullman dining car, four ten-compartment sleepers, one twelve-section drawing room car and a six-compartment observation car comprise the equipment of the special train that will bring the Japanese to Kansas City over the Burlington railroad. The train will be in charge of W. A. Lalor, assistant general passenger agent for the Burlington at St. Louis.

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October 16, 1909

HOMESEEKERS WEST BOUND.

Record Breaking Crowd Took Ad-
vantage of Last Day Rates.

Yesterday, the last day of the colonist rates to the Pacific coast, brought out a record breaking crowd of homeseekers. Every train west bound yesterday carried additional coaches and yesterday morning Santa Fe No. 1 for California was made up of three sections. The colonists this year practically have all gone to Southern California. Very few have gone to the Northwest or the central sections in the West.

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October 15, 1909

BUT FEW LANDMARKS LEFT.

A Resident of 20 Years Ago Only
Recognizes Union Depot.

"Kansas City has made wonderful progress since I left here twenty years ago," said C. W. Rogers of Santa Monica, Cal., who with his wife and daughter arrived at the Hotel Kupper yesterday for a visit in the city. "I failed to recognize any part of the city but the old Union depot. As soon as you build your new depot there will not be many landmarks of the Kansas City of a score of years ago.

"We believe that we have one of the most wonderful little cities in the world out on the Pacific coast," continued Mr. Rogers. "We recently completed a concrete pier, the first on the Pacific coast, at a cost of $100,000. The pier is 1,600 feet long and thirty-five feet wide. The floor of the pier is twenty feet above the tide, and we have twenty-five feet of water at the end of the pier. This pier serves two purposes, one for the shipping interests and the other to carry our sewage into the ocean. This sewage, when it is emptied into the sea, is as free from germs as the purest water."

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October 12, 1909

JANITOR WORRY KILLS HIM.

Real Estate Man Falls Dead Upon
Inspecting Apartment House
Employes Had Neglected.

Heart disease made acute by worry over the janitor service in an apartment house on West Thirty-fourth street, for which he was the agent, is said to have caused the death of Dr. Ammon Kuns, a real estate man of 805 East Fourteenth street, who expired suddenly in front of the apartments at 6 o'clock last night.

Dr. Kuns, who seven years ago retired from dentistry in order to handle realty, had been suffering from pulmonary trouble for more than a year. He left his home yesterday morning in good spirit and apparently in excellent health, remarking to his wife that he would go to the flat on Thirty-fourth street before supper and see about hiring a new janitor.

"Everyone leaves the rooms in a worse condition than the last," he said. "It is about the only worry I have."

Mrs. Kuns said last night that she had learned that conditions at the apartments were not even as good as her husband had expected when he arrived there. She believed that his dismay at finding that some of his instructions had been neglected caused the undue excitement that hastened his end.

Mr. Kuns was 57 years old. He was born in Illinois, went to Jewell City, Kas., 27 years ago to practice dentistry, and lived there continuously up to seven years ago when he moved to Los Angeles, Cal. Four years ago he came to Kansas City.

Besides the widow, he is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Stella Mayhue, San Francisco; Mrs. Theodore Conley, Los Angeles; Mrs. O. E. White, of Jewell City, and Miss Helen, living at the home.

Kuns was a member of the Odd Fellows, Masonic and Woodmen of the World, local lodges. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky ordered the body sent to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

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September 18, 1909

MARRIES A MILLIONAIRE.

Miss Florence Oakley Received Stage
Training in Kansas City.

A romance which began over a year ago in the Auditorium theater, Los Angeles, Cal., culminated Thursday at San Rafael, just out of San Francisco, when Miss Florence Oakley, leading woman at the Liberty theater, Oakland, was married to Percival Pryor.

Miss Oakley is a Kansas City girl, and off the stage was known as Miss Florence McKim. Mr. Pryor is the only son of Judge J. H. Pryor, a millionaire of Pasadena, Cal.

While the engagement has been announced for some time, the young couple slipped away form the theater in Oakland in the afternoon and drove to San Rafael in a motor car where they were married. Mr. Pryor is 24 years old and his bride 20.

When Florence McKim, now Mrs. Pryor, was but 10 years old she appeared here in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and made such a hit that she attracted the attention of Miss Georgia Brown, who has a dramatic school. From that time until her first engagement with the Carlton Macy stock company of Cleveland, O., she was a protege of Miss Brown. The young woman had talent and her rise was rapid. While under contract with David Belasco in New York and waiting to be placed, Miss Oakley received an offer of $225 a week from the Blackwood Stock company of Los Angeles to become a leading woman and accepted. It was her guiding star that sent her there, as through that engagement she met, loved, became engaged to and now has married the only son of a millionaire, and "Father" is said to be very fond of her.

"Florence was a dear little girl and a born actress," said Miss Georgia Brown, her instructor, last night.

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August 31, 1909

LEFT EAST FOR FRISCO
CLAD IN A PAPER SUIT.

"Hobo Harry" Started From New
York to Walk 3,850 Miles
for a Prize.

"Hobo Harry," who left Madison Square garden in New York June 21, clothed only in seven old newspapers fastened on with a ball of string, reached Kansas City last night at 9 o'clock en route on foot and also "on the bum" to San Francisco.

"Harry" says he is walking for a prize of $2,500 offered by a company of New York publishers. Certain restrictions, which the pedestrian has found hard to meet, were laid down as additional barriers. He must not put up at a hotel nor sleep on a bed; he must not work to earn money n or can he buy anything to sell for a profit.

About the only source of revenue left to him is his suit of clothes. He sells space on his coat, hat and even trousers to those who want to write their signatures as souvenirs in indelible ink.

His paper suit lasted his just three hours and ten minutes had he walked through New York, New Jersey, Arlington and Newark clad in nothing but this journalistic raiment. At Newark he solicited a suit of duck clothing from an obscure philanthropist and the first of his great obstacles was overcome. At Columbus, O., he "bummed" a tough suit of khaki and already this is covered by more than 100 signatures. The highest price he ever received for "advertising space" on his khaki suit was a $2.50 gold piece, he says.

"Harry: says he doesn't allow himself more than eight hours' rest at a time. To win the prize he must make the journey in 156 walking days, Sundays and rainy days are not counted. He says he has reached Kansas City about twenty days ahead of his schedule, based on the total distance of 3,850 miles, as calculated by Weston.

"I am going to beat Weston's first record of 139 days," he said. "Dan O'Leary made the trip in 102 days in '97 and Weston made it again in 105."

He left Lexington, Mo., at 3 o'clock yesterday morning and covered the distance of forty-eight miles to Kansas City by 9 o'clock at night. He will resume his journey Thursday morning at 4 o'clock.

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July 12, 1909

OUTING FOR BOYS AND GIRLS.

Given Tour of United States and
Europe by Newspaper.

On a tour of the United States and Europe, nine boys and girls about 16 and 17 years old, from Los Angeles, Cal., yesterday passed through Kansas City and were obliged to delay here several hours on account of train service conditions. The party, which was chaperoned by Mrs. Scott Pond-Pope and Miss Catherine Harkness, was at the Coates house. The afternoon was spent in seeing the parks and boulevards.

Four of the girls of the party will go to New York and sail on the steamer Baltic, July 17, for London. They will visit the principal points of interest on the Continent. The rest of the party will spend a day in each of the large Eastern cities, taking in Niagara Falls and a trip up the Hudson river.

Prudence Thompson, Jessie Young, Grace Amestoy and Emma Simpson will go to Europe. Vane McKee, Rufus Brent, Clarance Ballard, Beatrice Morrow and Margaraet Goodell will tour the states. The trip is given the young people under the auspices of a Los Angeles newspaper and is in charge of H. J. Weldon. They left Los Angeles July 1 and expect to return August 28.

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July 19, 1909

WALKED FROM WASHINGTON.

Atwell J. Cross, 69, Dividing Honors
With Edward Payson Weston.

Edward Payson Weston isn't the only aged pedestrian who can break records. Atwell J. Cross, 69 years old, soldier and prospector,arrived in Kansas City yesterday in excellent condition after a little walk from Washington, D. C., whence he started May 6. He walked every foot of the way except a short trip by railway between Springfield and Quincy, Ill., when he was sick, and wished to go to a hospital in Quincy. Cross is on his way to Denver, where he has a mining claim.

He started from the capital with the intention of making twenty-five miles a day, but when he reached Zanesvile, O., he discovered that he had averaged 35 11/13 miles. After that the roads grew worse, and his average slumped. He was put back four days by sickness at Quincy. He expects to leave here today.

Cross, as a boy, was one of the gold seekers who rushed to California in 1849. During the civil war he was first a member of the Nineteenth Maine infantry, but was wounded in the leg at Gettysburg and discharged. He afterward re-enlisted in the Seventeenth Massachusetts infantry, and finished the war with that regiment. All his life he has been a prospector or engaged in some outdoor employment.

Cross supports himself by selling shoe laces in the towns where he stops. He is a single man and has no near relatives living.

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June 3, 1909

SOUTHERN COLLEGE GIRLS
MAKING A TOUR OF WEST.

President of Nashville Institution
Makes Yearly Trip Educa-
tional Feature.

Kansas City underwent an invasion of college girls yesterday. They are from Radnor college, in the suburbs of Nashville, Tenn., and are on a tour through the West, personally conducted by President A. N. Esham, head of the institution, who has made these educational trips a yearly feature of the curriculum.

The special train with 210 girls aboard came in over the Missouri Pacific at 7 o'clock yesterday morning and was here until 10 o'clock when it left for the Pacific coast over the Santa Fe. Three Metropolitan cars were chartered and a trolley trip was taken through Kansas City. thee cars went out Independence avenue and returning, went south over the Troost line to Forty-seventh street, thence back to the Union depot by way of the Rockhill line.

From Kansas City the route lies over the Santa Fe to Los Angeles, thence over the Southern Pacific through San Francisco to Salt Lake, from Salt Lake to Denver over the Denver & Rio Grande and Colorado Midland and from Denver back to Kansas City over the Union Pacific. The return to Nashvilile from Kansas City will be made via the Frisco to Memphis and from there over the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis to Nashvile. The excursionists will be in Kansas City again June 16.

President Eshain gave a check for $12,000 to W. M. Hunt, railroad agent in Nashville, in payment for tickets and sleepers for the excursionists. This was the largest sum ever paid for private passage in Nashville. Only the government has paid more, for the transportation of troops.

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May 29, 1909

HOWARD BACK TO STAY.

Kansas City Capitalist Returns From
Trip to Pacific Coast.

Chris Howard, a Kansas City capitalist and investor, who went to Los Angeles, Seattle and other coast cities over a year ago, has returned.

"Kansas City is the peer of them all," said Mr. Howard yesterday. "This is the place for the poor man, the progressive man and the investor. I'm back to stay, and there a whole lot of Kansas City people who cast their fortunes along the pacific coast country that are wishing they were back here."

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May 22, 1909

PLEADS FOR MELISSA SHARP.

Brother in California Says She Was
Influenced by Husband.

Judge Latshaw has received a letter from A. Z. Roper, 743 Towne avenue, Los Angeles, brother of Mrs. Melissa Sharp. The letter which bears the date of May 15, attempts to excuse Mrs. Sharp for whatever she may have done for the reason that she was wholly under Sharp's influence. As Mrs. Sharp is not now on trial, the letter is interesting only as shedding light on Sharp's character. In part it follows:

"I think, as all of her relatives and friends, that she (Mrs. Sharp) should not be punished as her husband should be, even if they can prove that it was the bullet from her pistol that killed the policeman (Mullane).

"What she has done, I think, in the last few years, she has done under his influence. I fear that she was afraid of him and if it had not been for him she would not have done what she has. James Sharp stole her from her home when he wanted to marry her and I hear from some other that he abused her, shaved her eyebrows off and cut her hair when he got mad at her."

Roper then pleads for leniency for Mrs. Sharp, asks her acquittal or release "on probation."

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May 7, 1909

CHEERING THRONGS
BID WESTON WELCOME.

AGED PEDESTRIAN SET HOT
PACE DURING THE DAY.

Arrived in Kansas City Fresh and
Strong With Admirers Trailing
at Heel -- Proceeds to
Kansas Today.
Edward Payson Weston, the Aged Pedestrian.
EDWARD PAYSON WESTON.

Cheered by thousands of people, Edward Payson Weston, the aged pedestrian, who is enroute from New York to San Francisco, swung briskly into the downtown section of Kansas City yesterday afternoon at 4:15 o'clock and reaching the Coates house at 4:45 completed the day's walk, having made twenty-nine miles from Oak Grove, his stopping place last night, to Kansas City in eight hours and thirty minutes, with ease. He was not travel worn nor weary, and walked the last few miles of the day at a terrific pace.

"It was the greatest day of the trip to date," said Weston, as he waved adieu to the crowd that followed him through the downtown streets to the doors of his hotel. "Never have I been so royally received. And never on any of my jaunts have I traveled such roads and passed through such beautiful country as I did today. I will never forget this day and the kind people of Kansas City."

IN GREAT FORM.

Greatly refreshed by ten hours sleep at Oak Grove, Weston set out from that place yesterday morning at 7:30 o'clock. In the cool, bracing morning air he reeled off the miles in great form, little like he entered Oak Grove the night before, when he was on the verge of collapse as the result of a most trying walk under a broiling sun. The trip to Independence was made without incident. With the exception of a stop for a glass of milk and another to eat some raw eggs, the veteran never broke his stride, and at 1:30 o'clock he entered the public square at Independence. Scores of people cheered him and sought to give him a more demonstrative welcome, but he dodged them and made his way to the Metropolitan hotel, a stopping place in the early days for ox teams en route from the Atlantic to the Pacific over the same route the "hiker" is following.

At the Metropolitan, Weston ate heartily a generous portion of oatmeal. Lying on a cot he talked between bites to newspaper men and Y. M. C. A. athletes who had journeyed to Independence to meet and accompany him to Kansas City. After fifty minutes of eating and resting, he arose, walked backwards down the stairs of the hotel to prevent any jar to his knees, and started rapidly for the city.

CHILDREN CHEERED HIM.

The route out of Independence was down West Maple street. On this thoroughfare is located the Central high school, and as Weston approached the school hundreds of school children were released from their studies to greet him. To the wild cheering of the boys and girls and the handclapping of the many people who lined the curbs of the street, the old man lifted his hat and bowed again and again. The short, stubby stride was broken for the first time, and the walker grasped the hand of George S. Bryant, principal of the school, a friend of years ago. A hurried greeting and adieu and Weston was again on his way. Twice between Independence and Kansas City, the old fellow was again greeted by throngs of school children, and each time he bowed his appreciation. "It does me more good than anything else to have these children greet me," he said. "It cheers me, and makes my journey easier."

The Y . M. C. A. hikers who were accompanying the old pedestrian on his entry into the city, were hustling to keep a pace when the city limits were reached at 3:12 o'clock. Weston was averaging, as he did early in the day, four miles an hour, and the pace was a little too fast for the unseasoned striders, but they struggled gamely on. At the city limits, the escort of mounted police joined the party, and it was well that this escort was provided, for along Fifteenth street and through the business section of the city the crowd that followed the pedestrian and rushed into the streets to greet him would have been uncontrollable.

Such an enthusiastic welcome as was given Weston has seldom been given an athlete in Kansas City. On every side there were cheers of "Hello, Weston," "You're all right, old boy," etc. To all of these Weston bowed his thanks. He stopped but twice, once to greet John DeWolfe, who lives near the Blue river. Weston and DeWolfe were friends thirty-nine years ago.

After reaching the Coates house Weston Hurried to his room where he changed his clothes and bathed his feet in the preparation he always uses, briny water.

LECTURES AT Y. M. C. A.

Last night Mr. Weston spoke before a large audience in the gymnasium of the Y. M. C. A. building on Wyandotte street. His remarks were confined principally to events on his present long hike, and he predicted he would arrive in San Francisco on schedule time. By 9 o'clock he was through with his lecture, and a half hour later was snugly in bed at the Coates house. He left a call for 4 o'clock this morning, and by 5 o'clock he expects to be well on his way to the West.

Weston goes from Kansas City to Lawrence, and will cover the distance over the roadbed of the Union Pacific railroad. He is due in Lawrence tonight, where he will rest until Saturday morning, when he will start out for Topeka, again taking the railroad right-of-way, by which he saves eleven miles in distance as compared with the open highway. He is scheduled to lecture in Topeka.

Weston is a most picturesque character. Clad in a white blouse that is fringed with embroidery at the neck and wrist, plaid walking trousers suspended by a broad belt and heavy shoes with gaiters, his dress does just what he wishes it to do -- attract attention. He shows his seventy years only by his wheat head and a drooping white mustache. He is of wiry build, about 5 feet 6 inches in height and weighs 140 pounds. As he walks he allows his body to weave slightly from side to side, removing to a great extent the jar of the walking. At this stage of the journey he is in excellent physical condition. Yesterday was the hardest day he has experienced on this or any other walk, according to his own statement. Barring a succession of several such days he should be able to finish his long journey on schedule time and in good condition.

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May 3, 1909

WESTON NEARS KANSAS CITY.

At Marshall Tonight and Should
Reach Here Wednesday.

Edward Payson Weston, the famous pedestrian, who is expected to arrive in Kansas City next Wednesday morning on his tour from New York to San Francisco, left Mexico, Mo., at 12:05 o'clock this Monday morning, bound for Marshall, Mo. He expected to reach Marshall by midnight tonight.

A long distance telephone message from Mexico brought the information that the pedestrian left there in fine condition, and confident of beating his schedule into Kansas City.

In his walk to Marshall Weston is using the Chicago & Alton railroad tracks.

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April 30, 1909

IN TWO GREAT EARTHQUAKES.

Italian Girl, Who Was at Frisco,
Also in Sicily Shake.

At the Union depot last night 300 Slav immigrants from Europe were classified according to their destination by Interpreter George Jenkins. The groups were then bundled aboard trains headed in every direction but east.

A few minutes after the main deluge of foreigners entered the station, twenty-two Italians arrived, nineteen of them bound for California.

Emma Garboli, a Piedmontese girl 20 years old, was on the way to rejoin her husband, Giovanni Garboli, a track workman of San Francisco. She told Mr. Wallenstrom that she was in San Francisco at the time of the earthquake and that last year she returned to Italy in time to feel the shocks of the great earthquake there.

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April 27, 1909

POLL TAX ON DAUGHTERS.

New Zealander Obliged to Pay Upon
Arrival in San Francisco.

That taxation without representation is still enforced in the United States and ought to be suppressed, is the opinion of George Plummer, a wool manufacturer and merchant of Auckland, New Zealand, who, with his three daughters, is making a tour of the globe. Mr. Plummer declares he was obliged to pay a poll tax of $4 for each of his daughters and himself when they arrived in San Francisco from Australia several days ago.

"They said they would return it if we left the country within thirty days," said Mr. Plummer at the Hotel Kupper yesterday. "We have stopped in all of the larger cities in the West from San Francisco, but in my opinion Kansas City far excels any of them in point of industry, progressiveness and metropolitanism. A more beautiful park and boulevard system would be hard to imagine."

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April 21, 1909

BANK OF COMMERCE
UNDER NEW CONTROL.

J. WILSON PERRY OF ST. LOUIS
IS ITS PRESIDENT.

Dr. W. S. Woods, David T. Beals and
W. T. Kemper Retire From
Active Interest in the
Institution.

As the culmination of a deal by which St. Louis bankers gained control of the National Bank of Commerce, J. Wilson Perry, formerly vice president of the National Bank of Commerce in St. Louis, was elected yesterday to the presidency of the Kansas City institution to succeed David T. Beals, who retires from active business. Dr. W. S. Woods relinquished control of the bank to Mr. Perry yesterday morning, following which Mr. Perry's election immediately took place. Dr. Woods also retires from active business life.

With Mr. Perry, William L. Buechle of St. Louis, former national bank examiner for Missouri, was elected as vice president to succeed William T. Kemper, who has resigned, and George D. Ford, director, elected vice president, the position having been created for him. Mr. Kemper was elected president of the Commerce Trust Company yesterday afternoon to succeed Dr. Woods, and will devote his entire time to that institution. Dr. Woods will continue as chairman of the executive board of the trust company.

Mr. Perry commences his work with the Kansas City institution under the most favorable conditions. Forty years of persistent and competent effort on the part of his predecessors, recent reorganization and increased capital; a deposit account of more than $25,000,000, with a 42 per cent reserve, and an unusually strong and representative board of directors makes his success almost assured.

BECAUSE OF WIFE'S HEALTH.

Speaking of the change, Dr. Woods said yesterday:

"I took this step for several reasons, but principally on account of my wife's health. It is necessary for her to spend most of her time in the South and California. We will probably go to California to live. The trips I was obliged to take in order to be with her and attend to the bank's affairs at the same time taxed me more than I cared, so I simply made up my mind to retire from active business and devote my time to my family and personal affairs.

"After forty years of business, all of which time has been spent in banking, I believe I have earned a respite. My health is good, but I need rest and I feel it proper that I should now step aside and let a younger man fill my place.

"My years of association with the officers and directors of the National Bank of Commerce have been of the most pleasant character. I feel I have gained their confidence and esteem as they have mine, and it is with some regret that I sever these pleasant relations. I shall watch with great interest the growth of the Commerce with the new man at the helm. I have known Mr. Perry for years as a successful business man. He deserves the support of the people of Kansas City and I commend him to them."

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April 9, 1909

BUSCH INSPECTS PROPERTY.

St. Louis Brewer Looks Over Com-
pany's Holdings in Kansas City.

Adolphus Busch, president and principal stockholder of the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company, of St. Louis, passed through Kansas City yesterday in his private car on his way to St. Louis from his winter home, Ivy Wall, in Pasadena, Cal. The party arrived at 4:30 o'clock in the afternoon over the Santa Fe, and departed at 9 o'clock last night on the Burlington for St. Louis.

Mr. Busch took advantage of the wait in Kansas City to look over some of the property holdings of the company in this city, the erection of two new buildings being contemplated. With him on the drive over Kansas City were his son, Augustus Busch, who came from St. Louis yesterday to meet his father; Julius Bachman, local representative of the company; J. C. Harvey and Carl Conrad, Mr. Busch's private secretary and chief adviser.

Members of the Busch party from California were: Mrs. Musch, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Faust and F. Widmann. Mr. Widmann is the architect of the company.

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March 18, 1909

IS OVERCOME WITH JOY.

Mother Surprised by Sailor Son Who
Went Around the World.

When Frank J. Schatava, ordinary seaman on the battleship Rhode Island, came home to Kansas City from his cruise around the world with the fleet he didn't notify his mother at 9 Bellaire avenue of his coming. She was so overjoyed at seeing him that something like nervous prostration set in, and on this account her 19-year-old son has asked for a five days' extension to his furlough. He joined the fleet last June at San Francisco.

Nothing like the navy," says Seaman Schatava, "and I'm going to enlist again as soon as my time expires."

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February 10, 1909

POLICE "ARREST" MENAGERIE.

Elephant and Giraffe as Well as Ten
Human Beings In Haul.

The police department yesterday "arrested" a menagerie, which included one elephant, one giraffe, one zebra, one hungry-looking tiger and ten human beings. The arrest was made under the orders of the sheriff of Mena, Ark., and the Kansas City department faithfully carried out the instructions, though no one yet knows the reason for the arrest.

"When Detectives James Todd, David Oldham, Ralph Trueman, John Farrell and Samuel Lowe went to the Kansas City Southern yards they found a weather-beaten circus car with more than half of the windows broken. The inmates, consisting of five men, two women and three children, all shivering, seemed to be glad to be arrested. The animals seemed satisfied when the car was run into the Kansas City Southern roundhouse under the orders of the inspector of detectives.

"We are waiting for further instruction," said Inspector Ryan last night.

Members of the company said that they were on their way to Santa Cruz, Cal., and that they did now know why they were being detained. The women and children remained in the matron's room, while the men were locked up in the holdover.

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January 15, 1909

TOURIST DAY AT UNION DEPOT.

Station Crowded Yesterday With
People En Route to California.

It was society day at the Union depot yesterday. It was no special invitation affair, but one of the incidents of this season of the year. It is not often during the year that such an array of fine jewels, costly furs and fur lined overcoats are seen at the Union depot. It made the farmer boys stand back and take notice.

The occasion for so much display yesterday was the fact that it was one of the big days of travel from the East to the Pacific coast, or to California resorts. The travel from the East to California is so heavy the California Limited on the Santa Fe yesterday was run in two sections. During the short wait at the Union depot many of the passengers left the sleepers and took a turn or two through the Union depot.

It was a prosperous looking crowd of tourists in the way to the warmth of the California climate. One fellow, with trousers desolately bagged at the knees, with frayed edges, sweeping the rusty uppers of his shoes, followed the tourists from one end of the depot to the other with his mouth open in perfect wonderment.

"The diamond that woman is wearing reminds me of the first electric headlight I ever saw," he said to a companion. "Ain't it a dandy?"

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December 29, 1908

NO HONEYMOON IN A BALLOON.

Mr. and Mrs. Coey Will Go to Cali-
fornia by Rail.

Charles A. Coey of Chicago and Miss Carrie Hume Lewis of 1809 Linwood boulevard, this city, will be married at the home of Miss Lewis's parents next Saturday night. Mr. Coey is prominent in Chicago automobile circles and an enthusiastic aeronaut. The latter fact caused some of Mr. Coey's friends, who believe in practical jokes, to spread the story that with his bride he would go on a honeymoon trip through the clouds, starting in a large balloon from Kansas City. One Chicago newspaper accepted the yarn as fact and solemnly published it.

"It was an absurd story," said Miss Lewis at her home last night. "Why, we had never even thought of such a thing. We will leave for Los Angeles next Sautrday night, and don't forget to state that we will go by rail. After two months we shall return to Chicago and be at home at the Auditorium Annes."

Miss Lewis is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Lewis.

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December 25, 1908

CALLS HER HUSBAND
"GRANDPA."

Nineteen-Year-Old Susan Vauhn
Marries 74-Year-Old Man.

Groom, aged 74; bride, aged 19 -- such was a marriage solemnized at Independence Wednesday afternoon, Justice L. P. Anderson officiating. Benjamin Sellers, the groom, is sprightly and well preserved. His bride, who was Miss Susan Vaughn, a comely lass with red hair, is a picture of robust health. Her father is W. M. Vaughn of Sheffield. Mr. Sellers is an Englishman. In 1857 he entered the em ploy of General Tom Thumb as valet, with whom he traveled for fifteen years. He still has an old suit of clothes which belonged to the famous dwarf.

When seen yesterday at their home, 427 East Fifth street, Mr. and Mrs. Sellers were very happy. "I know it is something out of the ordinary," said Mrs. Sellers, "but it is no one's business but our own. Grandpa -- that is, my husband -- has been very good to me ever since I have known him. I am satisfied with him as a husband."

"Yes," said Mr. Sellers, "Susan, who has been my housekeeper since last May, has been a good one. I believe she will be a good wife. The reason? Well, you see, I am getting a little too old, and tho ught I ought to have someone to take care of me."

This is Mr. Sellers's second marriage. His first wife, whome he married when he was 32, died about three years ago. He has three sons and a daughter living at Wakeeney, Kas. He is a well-to-do man.

On New Year's day the couple will start out on a honeymoon tour. They expect to spend about three months in California and the West, after which they will return to Kansas City and purchase a home.

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December 21, 1908

TO LIGHTEN WORK
ON GREEK SHINERS.

JUVENILE COURT COMMITTEE
MAKES PROPOSITION.

Wants Standas Closed at 7 p. m., Night
School Established for the
Boys, and a Holiday
for Each.

Seven propositions were put up to the Greek proprietors of shoe shining stands yesterday afternoon at a conference between them and a committee, appointed by Judge McCune, consisting of F. E. McCrary, Dr. E. L. Matthias and James C. Chaffin. Twelve of the sixteen stands in the city were represented. Owing to the inability of the Greeks to fully understand what was wanted of them, and also because they could not agree on the proprietors and then meet with this committee of the juvenile court.. The committee of Greeks is: Joseph Snyder of California, an educated Greek who is a leader among his countrymen; James Katzoulos, 818 Walnut, Demetrius Nikopolis, 1130 Grand, and Peter Maniatos, 14 West Ninth.

The articles of agreement which they were asked to sign were as follows:

1. Employ no boy, except with the consent of the juvenile court, under 14 years of age.

2. Open the shops at 7 a. m. and close them at 7 p. m.; between those hours the boys to be allowed sufficient time in which to get three meals a day.

3. Lend aid to establish a night school for Greek boys to open January 2, 1909, and remain open each year for the same time that the public schools are open.

4. Pay the boys their wages only on the last day of each month.

5. Encourage the boys to save their money and welcome any case where anyone designated by the juvenile court or its committee may talk with the boys and explain to them the subject of saving their money.

6. In cases where employers have agreed to pay the earnings of any boy to his relatives or legal guardian, pay the money through City Comptroller Gus Pearson, such payments to be made on the first day of the month, beginning January 2, 1909.

7. Arrange all day work of the boys so that each one can have at least one half holiday each week.

With most of these propositions there was no fault found. The proprietors all expressed themselves as being willing to settle the matter amicably and to the satisfaction of the court. The only one of the articles which caused any considerable discussion was that of closing the shops at 7 p. m. But as they were made to understand the liability of the invocation of the eight-hour law, it is quite probably that they will arrange working hours so that the boys can have a chance to go to school, besides getting a little recreation. The committee of Greeks and the juvenile court committee will get together at 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, when an agreement will be made.

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December 18, 1908

MARRIED SAME WOMAN TWICE.

Still Frank James's Brother-in-Law
Couldn't Keep His Wife.

Harry Ralston was given a decree of divorce in the circuit court at Independence yesterday from his wife, Alice Ralston, whom he charged with desertion. Ralston is a brother-in-law of Frank James and the marriage dissolved yesterday was the second to the same woman.

Mr. Ralston stated yesterday that his wife had deserted him and taken up her home in California. They could not agree on the control of the children.

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December 16, 1908

GOING TO GOTHAM BY GOAT.

Man From San Diego Reaches Rose-
dale in His Slow Journey.
Captain Vivian Edwards Makes His Way Across the Country by Goat
CAPTAIN VIVIAN EDWARDS AND HIS TEAM OF ANGORAS.

From San Diego to New York, in a diminutive buggy drawn by a four-in-hand team of Angora goats, constitutes the unusual transcontinental journey, already more than half accomplished, by Captain Vivian Edwards, who reached Rosedale yesterday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock.

Captain Edwards, or "Santa Claus," as the children have dubbed him along the route on account of his horned team, is a cripple, having completely lost the use of his lower limbs, from paralysis. He is accompanied by J. R. Johnson, a globe trotter with a traveling record, according to himself, that embraces every corner of the known earth except Australia and New Zealand, and Cecil Fleener, a 14-year-old New Mexican, who has ambitions to visit all of the countries seen by his older mate, with the addition of the two antipodal exceptions.

Both companions of the goat driver are on foot and have walked every step of the way from California to Missouri, aside from about fifty feet which they rode through an Arizona mudhole. The camp paraphernalia of the party is borne by three pack burros.

Edwards is a great goat driver. He is making this long journey to further familiarize himself with the fidelity, endurance, magnamity and mental endowments of the creature. Then he's going to write a book on "Some Goats I Have Met," or "From Golden Gate to Gotham by Goat," or some such alluring title. That's the secret. The idea is to come rambling back, like Ezra Meeker did, and like the Alaskan and his dogs are doing, like they all do, in fact.

The goat driver's able bodied companion talks long and uninterestingly about the trip, which, for one of its kind, appears to have been extraordinarily devoid of incident and adventure.

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