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September 30, 1909

STEPS IN FRONT OF TRAIN.

Bonner Springs Man, Dodging
Freight, Killed by Passenger.

While walking along the Union Pacific double track about nine miles west of Kansas City, Kas., between Edwardsville and Bonner Springs, Roy McGee of the latter place stepped from one track to get out of the way of a passing construction train and was killed by a passenger train coming from the opposite direction. He was 22 years old.

Dr. J. A. Davis, the coroner, was notified and he instructed Dr. Heath of Edwardsville to assume charge of the body, which was taken to Bonner Springs.

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September 12, 1909

DESPONDENT, HANGS HIMSELF.

Wm. Mann, 80, Grieved for Wife
Who Died in 1905.

Brooding over the loss of his aged wife who died February 24, 1905, William Mann, 80 years old, a pioneer farmer of Johnson county, Kas., became despondent early yesterday morning and hanged himself with a halter rope in the barn of his son, James Mann, who lives in the suburbs of Bonner Springs. The body was discovered at 10 o'clock by Harley Mann, the ten-year-old grandson. An examination made by the Wyandotte county Coroner J. A. Davis proved that life had been extinct several hours.

Mr. Mann was at one time widely known as a successful farmer of Johnson county, where he lived more than 35 years. In 1903 he moved to Bonner Springs in Wyandotte county accompanied by his only son James. There the two went into the potato raising business. Recently James Mann has been locally known as the potato king from the fact that he yearly cultivated 300 acres of the tubers, considerably more than any other farmer in the vicinity.

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December 10, 1908

"ADAM GOD" HAS
NOT BEEN CAUGHT.

LEADER OF MANIACAL RELIG-
IONISTS STILL AT LARGE.

DETECTIVE BOYLE AFTER HIM.

BELIEVED TO BE HEADING FOR
BONNER SPRINGS.

Man Answering His Description Seen
in Armourdale -- Clark and Mul-
lane May Recover -- Selsor
Will Die.

Information was given the police about noon yesterday that a man answering the description of James Sharp, the "Adam God" of the murderous band of maniacal religionists which shot three members of the police force Tuesday, had been seen in Armourdale by a railroad man. Police were immediately dispatched to pick up the man's trail. At last midnight Sharp was still at large.

Every lodging house in the city and all the places were searched by the police Tuesday night and yesterday morning in an effort to catch the instigator of the riot of Tuesday afternoon in which Patrolman Albert O. Dublow was killed and two policeman and a citizen were seriously wounded. Many false clues were followed, as every policeman was anxious to find the man who had preached to his followers that it was right to kill.

Though the entire department was working on the case not a trace of Sharp could be found, and the information that he had passed through Armourdale was the first clue that looked good. The railroad man who telephoned to Chief Daniel Ahern that he had seen Sharp, said that the man had trimmed his whiskers and was bleeding. It was known that Sharp had been shot in the hand. When he laid a gun on the bar in John Blanchon's saloon, 400 Main street, while the shooting was going on in the street, the bartender saw that his right hand was bleeding.

NEGRO TRIMMED HIS BEARD.

According to the story told by the railroad man, Sharp stopped him and asked the direction to Bonner Springs, and then hurried on. He told the chief that he noticed blood on the man's hand and clothes. While Sharp wore a long beard, partly gray, during the fight, when he stopped in the railroad yards in Armourdale the beard was clipped, and his hair had been trimmed. Two hours later the police at No. 2 station were told by Chester Ramsey, a negro barber for George W. Robinson, 956 Mulberry street, that he had cut a man's beard and trimmed his hair and that man might have been the leader of the Adamite fanatics.

Ramsey said that the man came from the east about 5 o'clock Tuesday evening and, when he left the shop went west. The man acted strangely while in the shop, refusing to take either of his hands out of his pockets.

"He got in a chair and ordered me to take his hat off," said the barber. "He kept his hands in his coat pockets while I cut his hair and trimmed his beard I had about half finished when he seemed to get very nervous and said, 'Hurry up. I have to meet a man.' When I got through with him he got out of the chair and had me put his hat on his head. Then he made me take the money out of his left trouser pocket. He explained that his hands had been frozen and he couldn't take them out of his pockets.

"I said, 'You must have been in a colder climate than this. He said, 'Yes, I was up north of here fishin'. That was all he said."

The police believe the man was Sharp. They say he evidently was hiding his right hand, which was shot, and kept the left hand on a revolver in his pocket. The description of the man given by Ramsey coincides with that of Sharp.

CITY HALL GUARDED.

The police took precaution to guard the city hall and police headquarters all day yesterday. They were of the opinion that Sharp might return to the scene of the crime on Tuesday, and for revenge enter the station unnoticed and shoot one or more of the officers.

The police are not sure that Sharp is alone. Two patrolmen stood on the sidewalk at the main entrance to the station and two were stationed in the areaway opening on the market. Inside the station two officers guarded the hallway leading to the chief's office and our or five patrolmen and detectives were held in reserve.

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October 14, 1908

DISASTROUS FIRE IN
BONNER SPRINGS.

THREE BUSINESS BLOCKS BURN,
LOSS $125,000.

Origin of Fire is Not Know -- Rest of
City Is Saved by Inhabitants
Carrying Water From
the River.

The frantic honking of an automobile driven by 17-year-old Robert Waters, accompanied by his shouts of "fire" awakened the people of Bonner Springs to an appreciation of the fact that flames were eating away the business section of that city early yesterday morning.

The blaze, due, it is thought, to spontaneous combustion in the rear of the Kelley & Pettit drug store on Oak street, was first noticed by Isaac Milstead, a laborer. Backed by a mighty northern wind that carried a rain of sparks to the roofs of neighboring buildings, it spread rapidly and soon two entire business blocks were involved.

It was at this moment that the Waters boy heard the cries of Milstead and alarmed the town. In twenty minutes perhaps a thousand men, women, and children, in the absence of any fire-fighting facilities, were carrying buckets of water from the Kaw river to Oak street.

Many of the impromptu fire fighters were only partially dressed, and the morning air was sharp. The first attempt to get outside aid was made at 4:45 o'clock, a half hour after the blaze was noticed. Then the workmen of the Bonner Portland Cement Company's plant, situated four miles from the city on the electric line, were notified to board special street cars furnished for them and come with all haste.

ASKED CITY FOR HELP.

The idea was then to blow up some of the houses ahead of the fire or tear them down so as to keep it within the section it had already claimed. An attempt to blow up the Kuhn building, near Second street, was given over, as the flames beat the workmen there, so Kansas City, Kas., was telephoned for fire apparatus and all the companies it could spare.

Meanwhile men and women had organized a system in their maneuvers. The banks of the Kaw are steep at this point. Certain men were detailed to be dippers at the margin, while others handed the laden buckets to each other until they could be grasped and carried away. It was a lively scene and the energy displayed had a decided effect.

When, after repeated delays, No. 1 fire company from Kansas City, Kas, arrived on a special train, heroic treatment had done its work and only a smouldering three blocks of business houses were left on which to play the hose.

The loss in yesterday's fire is variously estimated by the local insurance agents. The best authorities place it at between $100,000 and $125,000. The insurance amounted to a little over $61,000 in all eleven companies.

SOME OF THE BUILDINGS LOST.

The buildings lost in the fire were: B. L. Swofford's dry goods store, loss $15,000, insurance $6,500; Waters & Frisbee building, loss $7,000, insurance $4,000; Walwer & Kirby stock, loss $300; Farmers' State bank, loss $300.

Dr. E. P. Skaggs, dentist: loss, $1,500; insurance, $500.
Knights of Pythias lodge: loss $200.
L. G. Frisbie, frame building: loss $2,000.
Hall & Fletcher, meat market: loss $1,500.
Edwin Page, pool hall: loss $1,000; insurance $200.
John Klem, frame building: loss $900.
Opera House block, Brant Adams, Olathe, Kas., owner: loss on building, $6,000, on contents not known.
Baxter & Kay Grocery Company, loss $2,000; insurance $1,500.
Mrs. Lia Dunn, restaurant: loss $700.
Kelley & Pruitt, hardware and drugs: loss $7,500; insurance $3,500.

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July 12, 1908

MEETING AT BONNER
WAS A HUGE JOKE.

"GRAND RALLY" TURNED OUT
TO BE NEGRO PICNIC.

Candidates From K. C., K., Who Had
Provided Money for the Fried
Chicken and Watermelon,
Are a Sore Bunch.

The first crate of lemons, those of the nice large sour juicy variety, was opened yesterday and passed around among about forty candidates seeking nomination at next month's primaries. The distribution took place in a grove just outside the town where a "grand old rally" was to take place. The candidate had all contributed money to help defray the expense with the understanding that the event would be of much political importance and one long to be remembered.

It will be remembered all right by those candidates who donated to the cause, as the biggest joke played on them in all of their political experience. The managers of the affair had promised to have Cyrus Leland, W. J. Bailey and other speakers of prominence as the principal orators of the day.

When the candidates reached Bonner on a Union Pacific train at 11 o'clock and asked where the big rally was being held, they were surprised with the answer, "What rally?"

"Why, the big Republican meeting today."

"Oh, yes, now that I think about it, I did hear something about a meeting that was to be held here, but none of us people know anything concerning it.. We have been trying to find out something about it ourselves. There is a negro picnic being held out in the grove north of town."

The candidates started out on foot to locate the picnic grounds. Upon their arrival at the grove they found a number of negroes enjoying themselves in the shade of the trees The men who had collected the money from the candidates to defray the expenses of the "big rally" announced that Leland and Bailey were unable to be present. Other speakers billed for the occasion were also conspicuous by their absence. The candidates were very much disappointed, but circulated around the grounds until the first train bound for Kansas City arrived.

The candidates declared that they had been "stung" by some of their colored constituents. Some of them took turn about kicking each other, while others laughed it off, claiming that it might have been worse. It seems that no arrangements had been made for the meeting, other than the collection made from the candidates. Before the candidates left the grounds, however, F B. Dawes of Leavenworth, who happened to be in Bonner on business, delivered a short patriotic address which was followed by brief talks by four of the candidates.

In anticipation of a political meeting Samuel Hackley of Kansas City, Kas., was on the scene with his box kites with large banners bearing the names of Taft and Sherman and the picture of Mr. Leland.

The candidates were all of one mind -- they had been jobbed, that was all.

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