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October 23, 1909

BOY-HUSBAND OF 19
CRUSHED BY A CAR.

Clyde Bailey, Married But Two
Months, Is Instantly Killed at
Eighteenth and Indiana.

Clyde Bailey, a carpenter, and a bridegroom of two months, who lived with his father-in-law, Andrew Curtis, 2811 Bales avenue, was killed by a southbound Indiana car between Eighteenth and Nineteenth streets at 6:18 o'clock last evening.

Young Bailey, who was only 19 years old, had been working all day with his father and brother on a building at Overland park, and at 5:30 in the evening left them at Thirty-ninth and State line with the words: "Well I'll see you in the morning, kid." He changed cars at that point and eventually transferred to the Indiana avenue car which would take him to his home and supper.

Charles L. Bowman, proprietor of a night lunch wagon at Eighteenth and Indiana, who was a passenger on the car with Bailey, said they got off at Eighteenth. Bailey walked south on Indiana to the center of the block, said Bowman, and seeing a northbound car coming, crossed the west track and tried to catch the car on the inside. He was thrown back on the west track in the path from the southbound car from which he had just stepped and which by that time was going very rapidly. the top of Bailey's head struck the inside rail of the west track and was crushed by the wheels, the motorman being unable to stop the car until it had entirely passed over the body.

Fifteen minutes after the accident Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky had the body removed to the Carrol-Davidson undertaking rooms, where it was identified by a book of Overland Park line tickets which he had purchased yesterday morning. His father, Nathan H. Bailey, 4435 Madison street, was notified, and his son, Cal W. Bailey, a brother of Clyde, was the first to arrive at the undertaking rooms.

The streetcar conductor, Jerome Moore, 835 Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas., and the motorman, William Erickson of 1049 Ann avenue, were arrested by Officer Fields and taken to police headquarters where Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Norman Woodson released them on their personal recognizance for their appearance this morning.

It was at first thought Bailey was Roland Allshire, son of Roy B. Allshire, a contractor living at 2421 Indiana avenue, as Bailey had one of Allshire's cards in his pocket. A verdant young man immediately repaired to the Allshire home, where he threw the family into hysterics with the news. They telephoned to the Loose-Wiles factory, where young Allshire works nights, and he soon appeared on the scene to contradict the story.

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August 22, 1909

GRANDMA CAMPBELL'S
FAMILY OF CHILDREN.

EIGHTY-SEVEN LIVING DE-
SCENDANTS -- SHE IS 84.

Anniversary of Her Birth Was Cele-
brated Yesterday -- Two Sons
Are Ministers -- Five Weigh
Over 200 Pounds Each.
Four of the Five Generations in Milbra R. Campbell's Family.

Six children, twenty-eight grandchildren, fifty-two great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

The foregoing are the living descendants of Mrs. Milbra R. Campbell, whose eighty-fourth birth anniversary was celebrated yesterday at the home of her son, George W. Campbell, 728 Wabash avenue. All the five sons who attended are over six feet tall and weigh more than 200 pounds each. They are Rev. John A. Campbell of Chillicothe, Tex., Rev. W. T. Campbell of Pueblo, Col., both ministers in the Baptist church, James H., George W. and David Campbell, all engaged in the live stock commission business in this city. Mrs. E. J. Henry, the only daughter, 1221 Bales avenue, was detained at home on account of illness.

At 1 o'clock a dinner was served to the immediate relatives attending the anniversary. During the afternoon an informal reception was held for relatives and friends. A photographer took pictures of "Grandma" Campbell, as she is familiarly known, and her five stalwart sons. After that group pictures of those present, representing many generations, were taken.

FIVE GENERATIONS.

The accompanying photograph represents but four generations of the Campbell family. There are now five. This picture was taken eleven years ago and shows Mrs. Campbell, her only daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth J. Henry, her son, Charles D. Henry and the latter's daughter, Miss Dorothy J. Henry, now in her sixteenth year.

The Rev. W. T. Campbell, who is here with his four children from Pueblo, Col., where he is pastor of the First Baptist church, is not a stranger in Kansas City. He held several pastorates in this city and organized what is now known as the Olive street Baptist church. He will occupy the pulpit there this morning and tonight. Rev. Mr. Campbell was also a pastor of a church in Independence, Mo., for four years.

The ancestors of this sturdy family, in which there has been no deaths since 1864, came from Scotland and the North of Ireland. In 1836 the father and mother immigrated from Tennessee and settled among the early pioneers in Northwestern Arkansas.

IN PRICE'S RAID.

The father, who was born in 1826, served in the United States army during the Mexican war of 1847. When volunteers were being called for to stay the failing fortunes of the Confederacy he volunteered to the governor of Arkansas in 1861 and was made captain of Company D, Fourteenth Arkansas infantry. After being engaged in many battles he surrendered with his company at Fort Hudson, July 8, 1863, and was made a prisoner of war. He died shortly afterward of a disease contracted in the army.

J. H. Campbell, the oldest brother, and John A. Campbell, now a minister, enlisted in the Confederate army later on and were with General Price in most of his big fights, and with Price's raid into Missouri. John was severely wounded in the battle of the Little Blue and captured, spending the rest of the war time in a military prison at Indianapolis, Ind. J. H. Campbell served with Price until the surrender at Shreveport, La., June 9, 1865. Both brothers were in the same company.

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June 1, 1909

WOMAN BALL FAN HURT.

Hit by Batted Ball at Afternoon's
Game With Milwaukee.

A young woman was struck and slightly injured by a batted ball at Association park yesterday during the final game between Kansas City and Milwaukee. She was seated in a box at the east end of the grandstand, near third base. It is the only section of the boxes unprotected by a wire netting and has recently been erected.

Barry McCormick, an exceptionally hard hitter, was at bat. He drove the ball on a line hard and straight. It struck a glancing blow on the young woman's cheek. She was taken home and the attending physician stated she was not seriously hurt. It was said the young woman was Miss Hazel Wilson of 1115 Bales avenue.

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April 29, 1909

WIFE SLAYER ESCAPES
FROM ST. JOSEPH ASYLUM.

J. M. Crane, Convicted of Murder,
but Committed as a Lunatic,
Coming to Kansas City.

ST. JOSEPH, MO., April 28. -- J. M. Crane, who was committed to the state hospital for the insane at this point about a year ago after having been given a life sentence in the penitentiary from Kansas City, for the murder of his wife, escaped late today. He had been given many privileges at the asylum of late, and it is believed made his escape after carefully planning to elude detection.

Superintendent Kuhn of the asylum is out of the city, and his assistant declines to give any information about Crane or his manner of escape. It was admitted, however, that Crane was gone.

It is said that Crane has a grievance against several persons in Kansas City, who testified against him, and assisted in prosecuting him for the murder of his wife. There is some apprehension that he will endeavor to do these persons bodily harm.

MURDERED HIS ESTRANGED WIFE.

John M. Crane shot and killed his wife, Henrietta Crane, on the evening of July 8, 1905, at her home, 1101 Bales avenue. Mrs. Crane, from whom her husband had been separated for some time, was sitting on the front porch when Crane came up the walk.

When she saw him coming, Mrs. Crane ran into the house. Crane followed. After a struggle in the hall Mrs. Crane ran across the street. As she ran, Crane fired several times, three of the shots taking effect. The woman fell dead in a neighbor's dooryard.

Crane was tried for the crime, and in spite of his plea for insanity was convicted and sentenced to be hanged. Five days before the sentence of death was to be carried out, Governor Folk granted a reprieve of thirty days in order that a commission might examine into the sanity of the man. The reprieve was given upon the request of deputy prosecutors. A number of physicians had examined Crane, and all said he was insane. Several said he was hopelessly demented and could live but a short time.

On May 5, 1907, after having been in the jail hospital for seven months, Crane was pronounced insane by a commission and was taken to the state asylum at St. Joseph.

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May 20, 1908

2-YEAR-OLD BOY RAN AWAY.

Restored to His Mother After an
Anxious Search.

For two long hours yesterday there was a distracted mother in Kansas City. That was Mrs. R. J. Nie of 432 Bales avenue, whose 2-year-old boy, Raphael, had disappeared. She missed the little tot shortly after noon and searched the neighborhood, but could get no trace of her offspring. In the meantime Patrolman O'Connor had found the baby at Independence and Bales avenues, ambling along as if he had business on his hands. Raphael made no objection when the officer took him in tow and seemed delighted at the long car ride to police headquarters.

When placed in charge of Mrs. John Moran, the little fellow began a tour of inspection of the quarters. When he landed inside the cell in the ante room Mrs. Moran shut the door on him, thinking to scare him. Raphael liked the cell as a "play house" and indicated that the door be left locked.

After Mrs. Nie had scoured the neighborhood she thought of the police and called up to see if they had her boy. They certainly had, she was told, and he was having a nice visit. Mrs. Nie boarded the first car for the city and soon Raphael, still in a good humor, was delivered to her.

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