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February 12, 1910

SCHOOL CHILDREN
DRINK INTOXICANTS.

Parents Supply Liquor to
Little Ones at Meals.

BEER, WHISKY AND WINE.

Doctors Say It Explains
Nervousness -- Plan to
Stop Custom.

The physicians who are empolyed in school inspection have been endeavoring of late to find out what the children ate and drank at home. This has been done with a view to finding the reason for nervousness in so many otherwise healthy children. In one school which has a large foreign attendance the information gained from but two rooms was startling. In one room of forty children it was discovered that seventeen had either beer, wine or whisky to drink with some of their meals the previous day.

In this room the teacher was making a record of what each child had to eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner the previous day. The following has to do only with the beverages, or liquids, served them:

Water -- Two had it for breakfast, eighteen for lunch and five for dinner.
Milk -- Three for breakfast, two for lunch and nine for dinner.
Tea -- Four for breakfast, two for lunch and nine for dinner.
Coffee -- Twenty-three for breakfast, three for lunch and four for dinner.
Beer -- Three had it for lunch and nine drank it for dinner.
Wine -- Three drank wine for lunch and one for dinner.
Whisky -- One had it for dinner.

In another room, while no wine or whisky was given t he children, they showed up strong on the coffee and beer. The report follows:

Water -- One had it for breakfast, six for lunch and none for dinner.
Milk -- Eight for breakfast, three for lunch and nine for dinner.
Coffee -- Twenty for breakfast, two for lunch and ten for dinner.
Cocoa -- Five for breakfast and one for lunch.
Chocolate -- One for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
Beer -- Five for breakfast, fourteen for lunch and fifteen for dinner.

"While people are buying $30,000 organs for churches here in this city," said the physician who inspected this school, "I think it would do more good to get a cheaperr organ and use the rest of the money in educating the parents of these children. The children of this generation will be the parents of the next and if they are reared on beer, wine and whisky, what kind of citizens will they make? This is a very serious matter and parents who see no wrong in poisoning a child's brain with alcohol and making it a nervous wreck before it is half grown must be taught better."

NURSES TO INSTRUCT.

On account of this startling discovery it is the intention now to go further than the inspection in the school and only in the home where disease exists. Mrs. Kate E. Pierson, a member of the board of pardons and paroles and connected also with the Associated Charities, has taken an interest in the matter. An effort will be made to secure nurses who speak the foreign languages necessary in this case, to go into the homes and instruct the mothers. They especially will be warned regarding giving intoxicants to their children.

"The nurses will have to do more," said Mrs. Pearson yesterday. "They will teach the mothers what is best for a child to eat, how and where to buy the proper food and how to prepare it. They also will be taught how to care for their babies and growing children."

"We find a great many nervous children in the schools, especially in certain districts," said one of the inspectors. "There is no doubt but that the giving of intoxicants is bad for them, but the constant drinking of coffee and tea by a child is also injurious.

"A growing child going to school needs the proper kind of nourishing food to hold up its end of the game. Much of the nervousness among the children in a certain district comes from alcoholic beverages, coffee and tea. Others are permitted to eat anything they choose and at any time, and consequently are badly nourished."

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September 26, 1909

FOR FREE TREATMENT
OF TUBERCULOSIS.

ROOMS PREPARED IN ASSOCIAT-
ED CHARITIES BUILDING.

City Will Furnish a Nurse and
Bacteriological Examination
of Patients Is to Be
Made Daily.

Three rooms have been fitted up in the building of the Associated Charities, 1115 Charlotte street, as a free dispensary for scientific tuberculosis research and the treatment of persons afflicted with the disease. Daily consultations will be conducted at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, beginning with tomorrow by Dr. Charles B. Irwin, assisted by Dr. Logan Clendening. Mrs. Kate Pierson, George Damon and William Volker volunteer their services in the management of the department which will receive its support from the Provident Association.

Dr. Irwin said last night that all of the rules set out by the National Tuberculosis Society would be observed.

Bacteriological examinations will be made of the expectoration of patients, who will be instructed how to treat themselves and how to prevent or minimize the extent of infection to others.

CITY TO EMPLOY NURSE.

Medicines will be dispensed and a trained nurse will visit the homes of patients to ascertain the sanitary conditions of their respective abodes.

This nurse will be employed and paid by the city, and Dr. W. S. Wheeler, sanitary superintendent, will furnish instruments and necessary appliances.

Those exhibiting early symptoms of the disease will be sent to the sanitarium at Mount Vernon, Mo., supported by the state, or to the one built on the old general hospital grounds by the Tuberculosis Society. There are accommodations at the latter place for twelve patients, and it is contemplated that later its management may be taken over by the city. Patients with whom the disease has reached an advanced stage will be sent to hospitals or probably treated at their own homes if the surroundings and conditions permit.

CARD OF WARNING.

Cards bearing this warning will be distributed among afflicted suspects:

"If you are in a run down condition, languid and suffering from night sweats, you are in danger of contracting consumption readily. It will be greatly to your interest to consult the physicians at the dispensary. Everything is to be gained by early treatment."

The dispensary has issued a printed list of suggestions to consumptives indicating the kind of exercise they should take, the kind of clothing they are to wear and what they are to eat. Eggs and milk are recommended in cases of fickle appetite and these will be supplied by the Tuberculosis Society if the afflicted one is too poor to provide them.

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September 25, 1909

HIS MOTHER TO A HOSPITAL.

So 10-Year-Old Son Starts to Walk
to Clinton, Mo.

Ernest Wolf, 10 years old, weak from typhoid fever and just out of a hospital, started out last evening to walk from his home in the rear of Holmes and Twelfth streets, from which place his mother is to be taken to a hospital today to his father's at Clinton, Mo.

The little fellow expected to follow the railroad tracks. When he got to the Union depot he saw so many tracks that he became frightened and began asking questions.

According to Ernest's story which Mrs. Everingham verified through the authorities, his mother, Alice, has been so ill that she has not been able to work for almost a month and arrangements were made yesterday to take her to a hospital.

Mrs. Everingham arranged last evening with the Associated Charities to take care of the boy until his mother is able to support him again.

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June 18, 1909

SYSTEM OF CHARITY
WORK IS CRITICIZED.

CLAIMED THERE IS NEED OF
REORGANIZATION.

Manner in Which Associated Chari-
ties Is Operated Doesn't Meet
With Approval of Some
of Its Members.

Criticism of the manner in which the Associated Charities of Kansas City is being operated at the present time, and an appeal for reorganization, were voiced at a meeting of the Men's club at St. Paul's Episcopal church last night. The heads of the three charities, J. C. Chafin of the Franklin institute, E. T. Brigham of the Helping Hand and the Rev. Edwin Woodruff, in charge of the institutional work of Grace Hall, spoke.

The demand for an efficient organization among the charities of the city was made. It was pointed out, particularly by Messrs. Chafin and Woodruff, and strongly seconded by Dr. John Punton that the present organization was an associated charity in name only.

"There is in charge of the Associated Charities," said Mr. Woodruff, "a man who has many worthy qualities, but his interests are with the Providence Associated, of which he is secretary."

NEED OF LOCAL CHARITIES.

Mr. Chafin said that the most urgent need among the charitable institutions of Kansas City today is a competent Associated Charities.

"The secretary of the present association does not give the attention that he should to that part of his work," said Mr. Chafin. "We have not dared to say anything about it for fear of complications, and I want you men to understand that we have gone further in this matter tonight than we have dared go before. It has been done with the hope that you as a body will take some action in the matter."

Dr. Punton spoke for a reorganization of the present Associated Charities, though he did not refer to the present secretary.

The Men's Club gave the speakers to understand that it would take action in the matter forthwith.

The meeting was arranged so that the work of the Helping Hand, Franklin Institute and Grace Hall might be put before the churchman.

Referring to recent criticism of the Helping Hand, Mr. Woodruff said:

NOT FOR FASTIDIOUS MEN.

"I have been to the Helping Hand and have eaten there. It seems to me that the institution is very well managed and organized. It is a peculiar fact that this criticism comes in summer time when the bums can sleep in the parks, under the trees. In the winter time they all flock to the institution for shelter. It is true that you and I would not choose to sleep at the Helping Hand. Nor does any millionaire tramp have to live in the North End."

The Rev. Mr. Ritchie of St. Paul's church further defended the Helping Hand:

"I have stood in front of the Helping Hand and watched the men come in. They carry an odor about their persons which would not please fastidious men, that is true. But fastidious men need not go there. The work of the Helping Hand is an admirable one, deserving of much credit."

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June 12, 1909

"SAVE THE BABIES" IS
THE CAMPAIGN CRY.

CITIZENS TO BE "TAGGED" IN
PURE MILK CRUSADE.

Three Hundred Young Women Will
Raise Money for Establishment
of Pasteurizing Plant to Re-
duce Infant Mortality.

Every Good Citizen Will Wear One of These Tags Today.

The campaign for pure milk for the babies will begin this morning when 300 young women, decorated with blue ribbons, will take possession of the town and ask money from the liberal-minded, in exchange for tags which will render them immune from further solicitation.

Stands will be placed in the main entrances of every large office building, each one in charge of a patroness and a limited staff comprised of two or three women and a policeman. Behind a table on which will be heaped the tags will be a large milk can to be filled with money from the contributions. Their campaign will begin at 9 o'clock this morning and cease at 5 o'clock this afternoon.

The money to be raised today will be used in equipping a plant for pasteurizing milk for what might be called the infant trade. Rabbi Harry H. Mayer, president of the pure milk commission of this city, declares hundreds of babies die here annually from diseases contracted by drinking milk taken out of tainted cans or which has otherwise been exposed to germs.

Two years ago a pasteurizing plant was established in the Associated Charities building and six sub stations for milk distribution were opened in the two Kansas Citys. The milk is hermetically sealed in three six and eight-ounce bottles. It is not given away, but sold for just enough money to pay for operating the plant. The commissions considered that, should the milk be given away, proud poor people would look with disfavor upon it as making themselves objects of charity.

Besides the women stationed in buildings, motor cars carrying a bevy of women and possibly a policeman will make the tour of the wholesale district morning and afternoon, so that none who are willing and anxious to give may lose the chance.

The police detailed by the board of police commissioners will go direct to the office of Charles Sachs, 631 Scarritt building, for instructions this morning, and they will carry the tags and blue ribbons to the women of the outposts. Tonight they will return the milk cans with their precious burden to Mr. Sach's office.

Mrs. H. H. Mayer will be personally in charge of the campaign as the representative of Rabbi Mayer, president of the pure food commission.

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April 23, 1909

OWE MORE CHARITY
THAN WE CAN REPAY.

DR. EMIL HIRSCH DISCUSSES
DUTY OF SOCIETY.

In Dedicatory Lecture at Jewish
Educational Institute, Chicagoan
Talks of Discrimination
Against the Jews.
The Jewish Institute.
NEW JEWISH INSTITUTE.

Spurred on by a desire to better the condition of the Jewish emigrant to this country and this city, the Jewish educational institute was organized six years ago and occupied a small building at 812 East Fifteenth street. After the fourth year of its existence the officers in charge decided to make it more of a power among the Jewish communities of Kansas City. To this end the late home of the institution, 1702 Locust street, was secured and the work was taken up with renewed vigor. During the past two years the utility of the institute has been demonstrated by its growth in popularity and the number of Jews who have attended the night school. The consequence of this growth was that the institute outgrew its home.

The handsome new building, at Admiral boulevard and Harrison street, is constructed of vitrified brick and is three stories in height. In the basement of the building is located a gymnasium and bath rooms for both men and women. The second floor will be given over to educational work of all kinds. Chief among the educational branches is the class in English for those who have recently come to America, and classes in civil government will be given special attention. Besides these classes, manual training, such as cooking and sewing, is to be established for the women.

The new building will contain a library composed of good fiction and reference books. The top floor is given over to a large auditorium in which weekly lectures are to be held for the patrons of the institute. This room will also be used for social events as well. The day nursery department will be one of the most praiseworthy features of the institute, and there the children of the women who are forced to work for a livelihood will be cared for during working hours.

HIRSCH GAVE DEDICATION.
Rabbi Hirsch of Chicago.
DR. EMIL G. HIRSCH.

Before an audience that filled the auditorium last night, Dr. Emil G. Hirsch of Chicago, in his dedicatory lecture, spoke on the duties of society.

"We are what we are through others," said he. "What little charity we give by no means measures what we owe. The property which you own has increased in value through no effort of yours. Its situation and mainly the incoming population has made it increase. You have not so much as touched a spade to it. This is Socialism, but what of it?

"Under Jewish law, land belonged to God, and no man had a right to the same property more than fifty years. Man, today, holds his possession in a title to which society is a determining element. Since you receive great returns from society you must give something to society.

"OUR BROTHER'S KEEPER."

" 'Am I my brother's keeper?' questioned the first murderer. That is indeed a murderer's question. Society is never better than the worst in society. We are our brother's keeper. Insane and evil are individual and perpetual elements, but society is responsible with the individual for the blood spilled and the sighs which are winged to heaven.

"As we keep our brother, in that manner shall we improve or degrade society."

From the question of general society Rabbi Hirsch turned to the matter of the discrimination against the Jews as a class.

"It is the greatest insult when one approaches a Jew and tells him that since he looks so little like a Jew he will be welcomed into a certain sect. I tell the man who utters such insults that I am better than he.. In the University clubs throughout the country, Jews are barred for no other reason. When I pass the University club in Chicago, I feel that I should pass on to Lincoln park and stand before the monkey cage.

VENEER OF CULTURE SICKENING.

"There no monkey holds his tail a little higher because it happens to be a little longer than any of the others, and I can derive more benefit by watching the monkeys. This veneer of culture is sickening, and it shows the lack of true refinement under the surface.

"Let the leanest of us Jews be mightier than the mightiest of them; let the weakest of us be stronger than the strongest of them. We are our brother's keeper and by them shall we be judged."

At the beginning of the dedicatory services and after the building had been accepted from A. Rothenberg of the building committee by Alfred Benjamin, president of the United Jewish Charities, Mr. Benjamin was presented with a loving cup form the Jewish population of Kansas City. For the past five years Mr. Benjamin has been the president of the organization and it was to express their appreciation of his services that the people presented him with a token of their esteem.

The opening prayer was delivered by Rabbi L. Koplowitz of the orthodox church and the benediction was pronounced by Rabbi H . H. Mayer of the reformed church.

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December 22, 1908

FREE TICKETS FOR ALL TO
THE GRAND TOMORROW.

A. Judah's Gift to the Children Will
Be Distrubted From Different
Charities Today.

Manager A. Judah of the Grand has invited the poor children of the city to a matinee performance by Corinne and her company tomorrow afternoon. The entertainment is being given in connection with the Christmas tree, and Manager Judah promises a surprise for the little ones who will be his guests for the afternoon. Admission will be by ticket, and the distribution of tickets will begin today, in charge of the following charitable organizations:

Associated Charities, 1115 Charlotte street (will also distribute tickets among colored population); Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street; Helping Hand, 408 Main street; Franklin institute, Nineteenth and McGee streets; Grace hall, 415 West Thirteenth street; Humane Society, city hall, second floor; United Jewish Charities, 1702 Locust street; Italian Charities, offices with Associated Charities; juvenile court, county court house; Bethel mission, 43 North First street, Kansas City, Kas; Catholic Ladies' Aid Society, Eighth and Cherry, St. Patrick's hall.

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November 27, 1908

HIS GIFT A DINNER
TO ONE THOUSAND.

HUNGRY THRONG IS FED IN CON-
VENTION HALL.

The Donor's Name Is Not Known to
One of the Hundreds of Hungry
Ones, But They Wish
Him Well.

Plenty of turkey with all of its harmonious accompaniments attracted nearly 1,000 boys and girls to Convention hall yesterday afternoon from 1 o'clock on until everybody who came was fed. More than 1,100 places had been set, but they were not all filled, showing that charity provided for some on Thanksgiving day who were able to provide for themselves.

Not only did the poor children dine, but a committee of 100 from the Associated Charities and the United Hebrew Charities sat down with them and ate the same dinner.

Some of the hungry urchins came in early and after eating their allotted meal came back again to make a secondary attack on the things to eat.

Two of the inevitable "stalwart policemen" were at the front door, and whenever any of the unfed came up, they were challenged thus:

"Had your dinner, boys (or girls, as the case happened to be)?"

"Unh-unh," was the invariable answer, with the accent on the first syllable of the negative, and the youngsters would skip gleeful over the sawdust to the tables where the waiters from the Sexton waited on them just as they do the guests of the hotel. To cap the verisimilitude, an orchestra played as the viands disappeared.

The dinner was provided by a man who formerly lived in Kansas City, and who was, perhaps, once a poor boy, hungry on Thanksgiving day. He now lives in New York city, and it is at his earnest request that the papers have not mentioned his name in connection with the dinner.

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April 11, 1908

PUT HER OUT, MOVED HOUSE.

Poverty-Stricken Woman Will Be
Cared for by Charity.

When house movers appeared on the scene to move a large two-story frame building at 1818 Cherry street yesterday afternoon, they found one of the lower rooms occupied by a woman. As notice had been served some time ago on the occupants, the woman, with her scant belongings, was moved into the street and the work of moving went on.

The woman, Mrs. Ella Allair, 53 years old, was at once looked after by W. H. Gibbens of the Humane Society and removed to the matron's room at police headquarters. Her case will be looked after by the Associated Charities. Peter Allair, her husband, 71 years old, is at present an inmate of the general hospital. The woman said that she would have moved when the notice was given, but she had no money.

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April 10, 1908

KYLE FINES WIFE
BEATERS HEAVILY.

TWO MUST SPEND YEAR EACH IN
THE WORKHOUSE.

A Pickpocket and the Assailant of a
Little Girl Are Fined $500 Each,
Also -- Lecture to Heavy-
Handed Husband.

Judge Kyle celebrated re-election yesterday by assessing four $500 fines, two of them being against wife beaters, one a pickpocket and the fourth a man who had attempted to assault a little girl. It was the judge's first day on the bench since election.

W. D. Russell, 2223 Campbell street, was fined $500 for beating his wife and putting her, with a 3-weeks-old baby in her arms, out of the house. Mrs. Russell's mother was also put out.

When Patrolman Noland was called he tried to effect a compromise. He told Mrs. Russell to go back into the house and see what Russell would do. Russell had gone to bed intoxicated, the officer said, and immediately began to curse and abuse his wife when she awakened him.

Mrs. A. Burgis of the Associated Charities said that Mrs. Russell had supported herself and baby, and husband, too, for a long time by making bed quilts, having made and sold twenty of them. When Russell insisted that he had paid the rent Mrs. Burgis said: "Not much you didn't. We paid part and your wife the rest." Russell is a big, strapping man and his wife a small woman. She was too weak and sickly to appear in court, but the officer and Mrs. Burgis did the work. His fine was $500.

The next wife beater to meet his fate was Fred Scraper of 313 East Eighteenth street. He was arrested by Patrolman McCarthy after he had raised a disturbance at his home. Mrs. Scraper and her little daughter both testified against Scraper.

"My wife irritates me," Scraper said. "The other night I went home with the earache and the toothache. Any man might slap a woman at such times."

"There is no excuse on earth great enough to cause a husband to lay even his hand upon his wife in anger. Your fine is $500," said Judge Kyle. Scraper was fined $15 on March 10 for disturbing the peace at home and given a stay conditioned on good behavior. He has been in police court many times for the same offense. He is an upholsterer's solicitor.

When Philip Packard was arraigned on a technical charge of vagrancy Sergeant James W. Hogan testified that on election night in a crowd in front of a newspaper office he had caught Packard in the act of picking a man's pocket. Bertillon records show that Packard had served a term in the penitentiary at Pontiac, Ill., and many workhouse sentences. He did not deny it. On December 21 last, under the name of Milton Steele, Packard was sent to the workhouse for attempting to pick a man's pocket in a pool hall. He was released April 1. Judge Kyle assessed $500 against Packard.

A man giving the name of J. H. McCleary, a news agent, was the last victim. He was charged with disturbing the peace. George W. Banfield, a contractor of Twenty-ninth and Flora, told how his little girl had been insulted by McCleary. Some little girls were hunting four-leaf clovers in old Troost park. When McCleary placed his hands on Mr. Banfield's daughter the girls ran and screamed. Banfield chased McCleary several blocks, caught him and turned him over to the police. McCleary was fined $500.

All four of the men fined $500 rode to the workhouse, no attempts being made to get them out on appeal bonds. The fine means one year in the workhouse.

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December 4, 1907

MRS. CROWLEY'S MISFORTUNES.

Her Husband Died, Her Home Burned, a
Child is Ill and She is Penniless.

For several days the doctors at the Emergency hospital have been caring for Mrs. Maria Crowley, and trying to find a place where she can earn enough money to support herself and three children. Three months ago Mrs. Crowley's husband died. Then about a week ago her youngest child, 6 months old, became ill with pneumonia. Saturday the house in which Mrs. Crowley lived, at Fifth and Harrison streets, burned, destroying all her clothing and furniture. The Associated Charities is caring for two of the children. The other is at the emergency hospital.

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September 27, 1907

CROWDED INTO ONE ROOM.

Family of Seven Persons Taken in
Charge by Authorities.

Seven persons, one a babe two days old, were found living in one room at 507 Grand avenue, yesterday morning by Edgar Warden, a deputy probation officer. Mrs. Mamie Cayton, the mother , and her infant were in the only bed in the room. On a pile of rags on the floor lay Mr. and Mrs. John Stevens and their daughter, Sadie, 13 years old. Frank Stevens, 9 years old, sat at the foot of the bed. There is another Stevens boy who was not at home. There was a gasoline stove, a kettle and a few dirty pans in the room.

Sadie and Frank Stevens were taken to the Detention home. The mother and child are being cared for by the Associated Charities. The other Stevens boy, when he is locate, will be cared for by the Detention home authorities.

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August 19, 1907

FOUNT FOR ANIMALS

DEDICATORY EXERCISES FOR
FIRST OF ITS KIND HERE.
FLOW OF WORDS AND WATER

ANIMALS IMBIBE WHILE GIFTED
ORATORS EXPOUND.
Fountain Given to Kansas City by
National Humane Alliance, of
New York, Begins Career
of Mercy Under Fa-
vorable Auspices.

During the dedication of the $1,500 granite horse and dog fountain at Fourth and Broadway yesterday afternoon, thirteen teams, nine horses in single harness and three dogs stopped, dipped their faces in the flowing water and drank deep. Frank Faxon, one of the speakers, kindly said:

"I am sorry there are no more horses and dogs present. I would like to ask them all to step up and have a drink with us."

Mr. Faxon was more generous than he thought, as he learned at the close of the exercises, when he and the other speakers and the audience rushed over to the fountain to get a drink. There are no cups on the fountain. It is strictly a place for birds, and four-footed beasts. President E. R. Weeks, of the Kansas City Humane Society, who wore a Panama hat, essayed to drink out of the rim of his headgear, mountain brook fashion, but most of the water ran down his shirt front. Mr. Faxon, Police Commissioner Elliot H. Jones, Mrs. L. O. Middleton and others looked on and declined to try to use the hat which Mr. Weeks proffered them.

The humans held a meeting around the fountain and argued the question of having cups chained there, but decided adversely.

"During a busy and hot work day," John Simmons, secretary of the Teamsters' union, said, "the teams line up from all directions awaiting their turns at the fountain. There is no chance for a man to get a drink. Besides, if there were cups, children who tried to drink might be trampled by the horses which rush to the fountain."

Nearly every department of city life was represented in the dedication exercises. E. R. Weeks was chariman, Hale H. Cook appeared for the school children, Mrs. L. O. Middleton for the T. T. U. F. M. Furgason carried a Judge Jules E. Guinotte proxy, George Hoffman spoke for the city hall, Father Dalton for the church people, Harry Walmsley apeared for the birds and Frank Faxon for "Old Dobbin."

No one had a word to say in condemnation of any bird or beast. The speakers tried to outdo each other in praise. Mr. Faxon said that a horse "was always faithful and kind," and Mr. Walmsley declared that the birds are symbols of the heavenly life." But Mr. Furgason, reading Judge Guinotte's speech, went then all one better when he quoted George Elliot as saying: "The more I associate with men, the more I like dogs."

In calling attention to the fact that the fountain dedicated yesterday was the first permanent one in the city, Mrs. Middleton recited the history of attempts made by various charities in past years to erect public drinking fountains. The most successful of these schemes was the setting in place of twelve ice water casks on downtown corners by the W. C. T. U. many years ago.

The beautiful piece of granite dedicated yesterday afternoon, which Thomas Wight, secretary of the Kansas City art commission, described as "a permanent bit of art and a forerunner of a new era in municipal life," was presented by the National Humane Alliance of New York. The purchase price came from a fund bequeathed by the late Herman Lee Ensign of New York, whose name is on a bronze plate on one side of the fountain. The Kansas City Humane Society and the city council were among those most instrumental in securing the gift for this city. The society hopes that other fountains may be erected on busy corners through gifts by local philanthropists.

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July 27, 1907

COMPLAINS OF A 'HOME'

CHILDREN MISTREATED BY AT-
TENDANTS, IT IS ALLEGED.


Matron at Joseph's Home Denies
Charges Made by Mrs. Ambie
Russell -- Juvenile Court to
Decide Next Monday.


Joseph Home, 2610 Cleveland Avenue
THE JOSEPH HOME, 2610 CLEVELAND AVENUE.

Upon a complaint of Mrs. Ambie Russell, who has had four children in Joseph's home at 2610 Cleveland avenue since last Thanksgiving day, petitions were filed in the juvenile court yesterday afternoon alleging that the children were neglected.


Two of them, Irene, 10, and Katie, 7 years old were found at the home, taken to the detention home and later to the day nursery of the Institutional church by Probation Officer Edgar Warden. The other two, Earl, 13, and Eddie, 14 years old, were not found at the home. Subpoenas were issued for Mrs. Anna Baker, manager of the home; Mrs. Nellie Shaw, who is usually in charge, and for Mrs. Leslie Lewald, an employe, to appear before Judge Goodrich of the juvenile court Monday morning.

In a signed statement which Mrs. Russell made to Humane Officer Frank McCrary yesterday afternoon she charges that Mrs. Lewald and Frances Robinson, a negro woman who was until recently employed at Joseph's home, frequently punished the children by strangling them in basins of water and by beating them in the face until their little noses bled.



ARE NEGLECTED, WOMAN SAYS.
"There are about thirty children in the home and they are not properly clothed and fed," Mrs. Russell says in her statement. "I have bought clothes during the last eight weeks for my children and upon one occasion when I visited the home I saw a dress I had taken out for Katie on another child and Katie was dressed in rags.

"One one occasion during my stay Mrs. Shaw, an assistant to Mrs. Baker, struck Earl with a stick and then hit him on the nose with her hand and dragged him off to bed. I went to his room and found his pillow saturated with blood."

Mrs. Russell was deserted by her husband four years ago in Herrin, Ill. she has lived in Kansas City several months and when she became ill went with her children to the Joseph home. Several weeks ago she left the home by request because it was said that she had spoken disparagingly of the place to prospective contributors to its support. Mrs. Russell is now employed at the Hotel Kupper.


WHAT AN OFFICER FOUND.


Edgard Warden, who brought the Russell girls to the detention home yesterday, reported that he had found Mrs. Shaw to be a very pleasant woman, and that the children seem to like her. He also said that the home has solicitors working in nineteen states. There are about thirty children there.


The two little Russell girls were neatly dressed when brought to the detention home. They said they and the other children at Joseph's home attended the Greenwood school, Twenty-seventh and Cleveland streets. They looked bashful and would not answer when asked if they had had enough to eat and were well treated.

The Associated Charities, through G. F. Damon, secretary, issued a circular December 5, 1906, containing what purports to be a history of Mrs. Baker.

Mrs. Nellie Shaw, the matron in charge of Joseph's home, emphatically denies the charges made by Mrs. Russell. Mrs. Shaw was formerly assistant matron at the Institutional church.

"There is no truth in any of the charges made against this home," said Mrs. Shaw yesterday. "I came here to take the management of the children in February, and since I have been here I can answer that there has been no cruelty of any kind. I have two children of my own who live here, and I treat them just as I do the others. The only punishment which children ever receive is a spanking. It is necessary where there are so many children that discipline be kept. But no one ever punishes the little ones but myself, and I only spank them whenever it is necessary, with my open hand."


CHILDREN LIKE MRS. SHAW.

The little boys and girls in the home do not seem to be afraid of Mrs. Shaw, but play about her in what seems to be the most affectionate manner.

"I think the boys and girls love me, and I have always wanted them to," said she.

Mrs. Shaw says that Mrs. Russell, who was an inmate of the home with her four children for months without cost, became angry at her because she suggested that some of the money which Mrs. Russell earned after she finally secured a position at the Kupper hotel be spent on the children.

" 'My money is my own,' she said, and seemed angry at the suggestion. 'I'll spend it as I please.' "

Eddie, Mrs. Russell's 14-year-son, was placed by the home on a farm at Arthur, Kas., and his 13-year-old brother Earl is on another farm a few miles from there. Mrs. Shaw says that the boys were not placed in adoption, but were simply put on the farms for a summer's outing. She says that is the custom of the Institution church and other charitable institutions in Kansas City to place children with private families, sometimes for adoption, unless a part at least of their board is paid. Mrs. Russell consented that her two boys be sent to Kansas for the summer, she says.


FOUNDED FOUR YEARS AGO.

St. Joseph's home was founded four years ago by Mrs. Annie Baker, who had run a similar institution for two years in Joplin, Mo. Mrs. Shaw says the home was founded by Mrs. Baker after being left destitute with two children, in order to help mothers where were in a similar condition. It is supported by public subscription.

"The whole trouble is that we do not give an accounting of our finances to the Associated Charities," said Mrs. Shaw. "They have been trying to get us to do this for a long time, and when we consistently refused to make regular financial reports to them they became angry and have been trying to do the home harm ever since.

"We cannot see why we should give up the management of our enterprise to the Associated Charities, who had nothing to do with its beginning or its development."

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April 19, 1907

FROM ROSEDALE, NOT SEDALIA.

Police Cast Doubt Upon Mrs.
Henderson's Story of Hardships

The police and the authorities at the Helping Hand institute have grave doubts of the story told by Mrs. Mable Henderson, who, with her blind baby, insists that she walked all the way from Sedalia, Mo., to this city, a distance of ninety miles, in three days. She says that she left there at sunup Monday morning , and arrived here at about 5:30 o'clock Wednesday evening, having had only 25 cents for expenses.

Mrs. Henderson was found by the police in the bottoms late Wednesday night, and sent to headquarters and then to the Helping Hand. She said she was not tired when she came in, refused food, saying she was not hungry, and neither her dress nor shoes were at all worn as they would have been from such a long tramp.

Early yesterday morning a man called Captain Weber at police headquarters and said: "I know the Mrs. Henderson with the blind baby mentioned in the papers this morning. She has lived with several others in a tent on the outskirts of Rosedale all winter. The men named in the paper as brothers-in-law, for whom she is now looking, lived there also. They all left recently and I don't know where they went."

The man refused to give his name. An official from the Helping Hand went to Rosedale and found the report to be true. He was also informed that Mrs. Henderson has two other children somewhere else. This she denied later. The investigation will be carried on further today.
"We have had at least twenty-five calls today offering to take both the woman and her baby," said Superintendent E. T. Bringham. "Several called in person and offered to assist in any manner desired. She was being cared for, however, and a specialist was secured for the baby, so all was being done what was necessary. The eye specialist, after a close examination, said that there was no hope for the baby ever regaining its sight, it having been blind from birth."

Mrs. Henderson said that she could get no place to work on account of her blind baby, the mother herself being blind in one eye. On this account it was said yesterday that an effort would be made to take the blind baby from its mother and place it in a blind institute, where it could be educated with others similarly afflicted. Left as it is, it would have little chance to make a living. The mother, when placing the child even in the nursery was mentioned, objected strenuously, and said that wherever the baby went she would go also.

"The woman is known to the Associated Charities," said Colonel Greenman, Humane agent, "and has been for some time. Agents from there are investigation the case now. Mrs. Henderson weighs only ninety pounds and her baby seventeen pounds. To reach here in three days she would have to walk at least thirty miles a day. That seems an impossible task for one so frail as she appears to be."

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February 23, 1907

ADOPTED A NINTH CHILD.

Mrs. Fanny Savage, Highwayman's
Wife, Accused of Neglect.

When Mike Savage, alias O'Brien, was arrested by Detectives Kenny and Ghent on a charge of highway robbery, at his home, 417 East Eighteenth street, the night of February 14, those officers reported to Colonel J. C. Greenman, Humane agent, that a little 5-month old baby was being kept there in squalor, wretchedness and misery.

Yesterday morning Dr. E. L. Matthias, of the juvenile court and Mrs. Kate Pearson, of the Associated Charities, went to the Eighteenth street house, while Mrs. Fanny Savage, the baby's foster mother, was away and took the little one to Mercy hospital, Fifth street and Highland avenue, where it is said to be in precarious condition.

When Mrs. Savage returned home she was taken before Colonel Greenman for investigation and asked why she had adopted a child of such a tender age and then had neglected it. She said her husband saw it at St. Anthony's home and "took pity on it" and for that reason she adopted it -- "just because my husband wanted me to," she said. "I have eight of my own now and five of them are at home."

Savage, James Severwright, Samuel Hite and Herman, alias "Dutch" Gall, are all confessed highwaymen now in the county jail awaiting trial.

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