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December 31, 1909

SILVER CITY TO
BECOME A WARD.

ARGENTINE TO BE MERGED INTO
KANSAS CITY, KAS.,
TOMORROW.

Population 7,000; Its Debts Assumed
and Assets Absorbed -- Will Soon
Have Gas Supply.

At 12 o'clock, noon, tomorrow, Argentine, the Silver City, of which great things were expected in the early '80s, will merge its identity into that of Kansas City, Kas. This additional territory will be known as the Seventh ward and will be represented in the Kansas City, Kas., council by two councilmen to be appointed by Mayor U. S. Guyer. By the annexation of Argentine and the extension of its city limits Kansas City, Kas., will have graduated into the class of metropolitan cities. It is estimated that the additional territory will increase the total population of Kansas City, Kas., to something in excess of 135,000. Steps have already been taken by the city authorities to assume active charge of the former city's affairs. Two police sergeants and eight patrolmen will afford police protection for the new ward.

Argentine was organized as a city of the third class in 1881. The city covers an area of six square miles and has a population of 7,000. It is on the south of the Kaw river and just south and west of the Sixth ward of Kansas City, Kas. The majority of Argentine's residents are hard working, industrious home owners. The city has a bonded debt of about $126,000, in addition to special improvement bonds to the amount of $70,000 and school bonds for a like amount.

There is also $60,000 in outstanding warrants. The consolidated city assumes all these debts. While the new territory is in debt to no inconsiderable amount, there are many advantages to be gained by its annexation. Argentine has two miles of bitulithic pavements and also two miles of macadam paving. In addition to this there are about fifteen miles of paved sidewalks. A fire wagon and a team of good horses, also 3,000 feet of new hose, are among the assets.

HAS FINE SCHOOL EQUIPMENT.

Many commendable things can be said concerning the system of schools in the new ward. There is a high school recently completed and five ward schools averaging eight rooms each. The teachers in these schools will be continued in their respective positions by the Kansas City, Kas., board of education.

Among the industries in the newly acquired territory are the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad shops, the Kansas City Structural Steel Works, the Santa Fe Car Iceing Company and the United Zinc and Chemical Company. Of these the Santa Fe employs the larger per cent of the people of the city. Two of the largest grain elevators in the state are located at the Argentine terminals of the Santa Fe, one with a capacity of 1,000,000 bushels and the other, one-half that size.

COULD NOT GET GAS.

One of the urgent reasons for annexation from the Argentine standpoint was the inability of the people of that city to obtain natural gas. This condition of affairs will be remedied by the merger. The Wyandotte Gas Company will extend its mains to the new ward.

C. W. Green, the last mayor of Argentine, during his four terms in office had much to do with the progressing of public improvements.

As to just what the effect of the Annexation will be on the complexion of politics is problematical. Persons in a position to know declare that the Democrats and Republicans are about evenly divided.

At a special meeting last night of the Kansas City, Kas., council the Democratic members refused to confirm the appointment of C. W. Green and J. W. Leidburg as councilmen for the new ward. Mr. Green is at the present time mayor of Argentine and Mr. Leidburg is a councilman in that city.

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December 31, 1909

NEGROES WANT EXPOSITION.

Delegates to Convention Hall In-
dorse Depew Bill.

Three hundred and fifty negro delegates to the convention of the Interstate Literary Association of the West, now in session at Convention hall, last night unanimously indorsed Senator DePew's bill, asking congress to appropriate $250,000 for a semi-centennial American Emancipation exposition to be held in some Southern city in 1913 to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the freedom of negroes. The proposed exposition also is for the purpose of showing the progress of the race. Professor R. R. Wright, former paymaster of the army, is one behind the movement.

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December 31, 1909

PUGILISM OR NAIL EATING?

Pardon Board Doubtful Which Tends
More to Good Citizenship.

Terence O'Grady, the human ostrich, is free from the workhouse by action of the pardon and parole board yesterday afternoon. He was arrested several weeks ago at the insistence of his wife, who said that his dual role of prize fighter and crockery eater unfitted him for the more domestic one of providing for her and their children. He was fined $500.

Investigation by the board disclosed that O'Grady, if not always a hard working man, possessed a heart as good as his punch and as elastic as his stomach. He said and proved by receipts that he is supporting his widowed mother in Ireland whom he has not seen for more than twenty years. The last money sent to her by Terence was mailed from Kansas City November 4 in the shape of a check for $100. It was one of many such remittances.

"I'll either go back to the prize ring or the kerosene circuit as the human ostrich," said O'Grady to a member of the board who asked him what he would do if paroled. He then added, "It's immaterial to me which I follow. I leave the matter with the board entirely."

Mrs. Kate Pearson stated during the session yesterday that she was afraid O'Grady might swallow a shovel if he were put on the street force. William Volker and Jacob Billikopf could not even guess which of the two occupations named were the best from the standpoint of good citizenship, so the original proposition was remanded back to O'Grady for a decision.

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December 30, 1909

LOOKS CONVICTED PRISONER.

Fallon Is Refused New Trial, But
Gets Sentence Cut.

J. B. Fallon was convicted last week in the criminal court and sentenced to five years in the state penitentiary, on his looks. Several jurors admitted after the trial that it was the prisoner's face and manner that caused them to vote for a conviction. Otherwise he would have probably escaped punishment.

Fallon was in court again yesterday on a motion for a new trial. Judge Ralph S. Latshawd overruled the motion, but reduced the sentence to three years.

The prisoner's looks were decidedly against him. He had long hair, carefully brushed and parted in the middle. The hair was oily, indicating a possible slippery nature of the owner. He had a small face and sharply cut features. His voice was soft and musical and he talked after the manner of a person who had made his living all his life by the "gift of gab."

Judge Latshaw told the prisoner that he might appeal h is case to the supreme court.

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December 30, 1909

FIND WOMEN IN A SALOON.

Italian Promises Police Board to
Bar Them in Future.

The board of police commissioners is having a hard time impressing upon the Italians of "Little Italy" the fact that their women must not frequent saloons. In the past some Italian women have b een as much at home in the saloon as in the home; in fact, many of them used to tend bar while their husbands were at meals.

Yesterday Mattaeo La Salla, who has a saloon at Missouri avenue and Cherry street, was before the board for permitting his wife and mother to frequent his saloon. It was some time before Judge Middlebrook could impress La Salla with the fact that there was a law in this state which prevents women from frequenting saloons. The Italian looked worried, puzzled, but he promised that his women folks would keep out of his saloon in the future.

Salino Defeo, 600 East Fifth street, and his bartender were seen twice, it is alleged , to serve a woman with a bucket of beer. Commissioner Marks was closing Defeo's saloon for two days, but, being Christmas week, Judge Middlebrook thought the board should be more lenient and a reprimand was given.

For having a man not in his employ in his saloon at 1:20 a. m. last Friday, John Honl, a saloonkeeper at 7306 East Fifteenth street, was ordered to close his place Friday and Saturday.

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December 30, 1909

WHITE GIRL TO WED INDIAN.

Miss Albertson of Richmond, Mo.,
to Become Bride of Educated Creek.

A license was secured yesterday by John A. Phillips, a full-blooded Creek Indian of Okemaha, Ok., to marry Miss Lulu B. Albertson, a white woman living at Richmond, Mo. The groom is a well-to-do real estate dealer.

Phillips is an educated Indian. He is a graduate of McComb college of Muskogee. He is a widower of a few years. His first wife was a white woman. Mr. Phillips and Miss Albertson met last summer when the latter was visiting friends in Okemaha.

The bride will return to her home in Richmond, to join her husband later in Oklahoma.

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December 30, 1909

FOUND DEAD IN A CELLAR.

George Dixon Stricken While at
Work Cultivating Mushrooms.

George Dixon, 66 years old, living in the Metropolitan hotel, was found dead in a cellar under the Last Chance saloon, Bridge street and Broadway, yesterday morning. Dixon, who cultivated mushrooms in the cellar, did not return to his home on Tuesday night, and his wife requested the police to make a search.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was summoned and after pronouncing death to be due to heart failure, ordered the body sent to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms.

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December 29, 1909

AEROPLANE BOWLS
OVER A CONSTABLE.

OFFICER GETS IN TRACK OF CUR-
TISS AIRSHIP AND PREVENTS
ITS DESTRUCTION.

Grabs Machine and Holds On,
Though Dragged for
Thirty Feet.

The several hundred people who attended the airship exhibition at Overland park yesterday afternoon and were treated to some genuine thrillers, and although Aviator Charles K. Hamilton succeeded in making only two flights in his Curtiss aeroplane, no one could complain because there was not enough excitement.

In his first attempt to fly Hamilton gave a pretty demonstration of the feasibility of the machine for aerial navigation until he tried to land in front of the grandstand. Just as the supporting wheels reached the ground a strong gust of wind caught the planes and despite the fact that the aviator had all the brakes on the machine fairly skidded across the field at a rate of about twenty miles an hour.

SAVES MACHINE; IS HURT.

It seemed inevitable that the aeroplane would crash into the grandstand and accomplish its own complete destruction, but Homer Breyfogle, constable of Johnson county, Kas., was standing near by and before he could get out of the way, the machine struck him and knocked him about fifteen feet. Officer George A. Lyons, a member of the motorcycle squad of the Kansas City police force, rushed to the rescue, but when he grabbed the swiftly moving machine he was hurled into the air and dragged to the ground. However, he "stayed with the ship" and was dragged fully twenty feet before the machine came to a standstill.

With the exception of a few bruises about the limbs, Officer Lyons was uninjured, but Constable Breyfogle sustained a painful cut on his neck and severe bruises on the face. Aviator Hamilton wrenched his foot in an effort to stop the airship.

HARD LUCK AGAIN.

The plane with which Breyfogle collided was so badly damaged that it required an hour to repair it, but at about 5 o'clock Hamilton was again soaring down the field majestically, and for a few seconds it appeared that he was at last to make a record-breaking trip, but after he had t raveled over a mile and was trying to turn for the homeward stretch, the engine suddenly stopped and the machine landed in a snowbank.

"I simply can't conquer that wind," said Hamilton after his last flight. "One can't imagine how strong this wind is until you get a few feet in the air and then it seems to be twice as fierce. It was all I could do just to keep the machine from capsizing just now, because the wind twisted me in every shape in a cyclone fashion. Dangerous business on a day like this, but I always hate to disappoint the crowds, and if there is any flying to be done, I'll do it no matter what kind of weather prevails.

"Aren't there too many trees and hay stacks around here to make aerial travel very safe?" asked a spectator.

HIGH WINDS HIS ENEMY.

"Yes, there isn't hardly enough room on this field, but if the wind would only go down for one day, I'd make some surprising flights. We may get some ideal weather yet. How's that? No, I don't imagine the North Pole district affords any desirable aviation fields. Anyway, we're not going to attempt any emulation of the Dr. Cook stunt. I am heading for sunny California, where I expect to carry off some prizes in the contests to be pulled off next month."

Hamilton will make the usual flights this afternoon at the park, and he promises to avoid any further attempted "assassinations" of police officers.

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December 29, 1909

A TIRED MAN IN A BOX.

Even "Girl From Rector's" Couldn't
Keep Him Awake.

For a time the stage of the Willis Wood theater had a rival in real life in a box. For a time it looked to many of the auditors as if the real show was not on the stage.

Shortly after the curtain rose in the first act Miss Millington, the "Girl From Rector's" happened to glance up at the upper left hand box. The eyes of the audience followed hers, and the smile that flitted over her face was contagious.

In the box a man of about 30 years, whose dress proclaimed him to be from the cattle raising sections of the Southwest, leaned over the railing. Slowly his head swayed. As his chin dropped on the bosom those on that side of the house heard the proverbial "wood sawing" sound. Catching himself, the tired auditor looked about the house and then slowly his head drooped again.

A messenger was sent to the front and an usher quietly slipped into the box. The man slept no more.

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December 29, 1909

DIES IN GROCERY STORE.

Nebraska Visitor Had Just Pur-
chased Cigars When Stricken.

While handing the clerk a dollar to pay for some cigars he had just purchased, Isaac N. Mothershead, 57 years old, a farmer of Niponee, Neb., died of heart disease in Edward Kendall's grocery store, at Fourteenth and Harrison streets, yesterday morning. Mr. Mothershead and his wife had been spending the Christmas holidays at the home of their daughter, Mrs. O. P. Haslett, 1420 Tracy avenue.

The body was taken to the Stine undertaking rooms in the police ambulance. A widow and five daughters survive him.

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December 29, 1909

P. O. NEW YEAR'S SCHEDULE.

Carriers Will Make Morning De-
livery; Department Hours.

An extra force of clerks and carriers will be maintained at the postoffice the balance of this week to take care of the lag end of Christmas deliveries. For New Year's day the schedule will be as follows:

All carriers will make one complete delivery, leaving postoffice and carrier stations at 8:15 a. m.

Three collections of mail will be made in the business districts beginning at 7 a. m., 2 p. m. and 6 p. m.

Two collections of mail will be made in the residence districts beginning at 8:15 a. m. and 5 p. m.

General delivery, open all day.

Inquiry department, open from 8 a. m. to 11:30 a. m.

Registry division, open from 8 a. m. to 11:30 a. m.

Stamp division, open all day.

Money order division, closed.

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December 28, 1909

SWOPE PARK ZOO NOW OPEN.

Many Animals Needed to Make
Place More Interesting.

"The zoo buildings in Swope park are open to visitors," said Gus Pearson, city comptroller, yesterday, "but we have not much in the way of exhibits to show them. The big place looks dreary with its array of empty cages, and if the people who volunteered to contribute animals and birds will begin sending them in they will be appreciated.

"The lions and buffalo are the largest exhibits we have, and there is room for the elks promised, and the moose that we were to get from C. W. Armour and the camel from the Shriners. Birds and smaller animal pets are also needed."

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December 28, 1909

SPADE STRIKES A SKELETON.

Woman's Bones Will Be Buried at
Independence City Cemetery.

While digging a trench at the northeast corner of the Waggoner-Gates Mill company property in Independence yesterday, the workmen struck the skeleton of a woman. The bones indicated that burial took place years ago. Some of the old citizens know the location as the Drury Herold place back in the '49s and the custom back in those days was to bury on the premises.

While it was not certain that it was a grave, yet everything indicated that the body was interred after the old fashion and no dread mystery was connected with the find. The bones will be buried at the city cemetery.

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December 28, 1909

HEIRS WAIT ON CONGRESS.

Civil War Claim, Allowed by Court,
Must Be Paid This Session.

For three years the heirs of Solomon Young, who died in 1892, have been waiting for congress to appropriate $3,800, allowed by the court of claims at Washington . It is thought that congress during its present session will take some action.

Solomon Young owned a farm in Grandview during the Civil war. A detachment of the Union army confiscated a herd of cattle and some horses which belonged to him. At the close of the war Young put in a claim for damages.

For years this claim laid in the files of the war department and was forgotten. When he died, in 1892, the estate was divided among the six heirs.

Soon after this an attorney in Washington unearthed the Young claim from the files. Suit was brought and in 1906 the court allowed $3,800 for the cattle and horses. The Young estate was immediately opened up, on the expectation that congress would pay the claim. Mrs. Henrietta L. Young, the widow, was appointed administratrix. Three years they have waited and congress has neglected to act.

Last Week Mrs. Young died. A new administrator is to be appointed for the Young estate. It will not be settled finally until the claim is paid by congress.

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December 28, 1909

MOTHER LECTURED BY JUDGE.

She Admits False Age of Son Was
Given Factory Inspector.

Mrs. E. L. Folsom, 707 East Eighteenth street, weeping bitterly, was lectured by Judge E. E. Porterfield in the juvenile court yesterday for making a false affidavit regarding the age of her son, Lyle H. Wilcox, in the office of W. H. Morgan, state factory inspector, recently when the boy went to work. She swore that he was born April 7, 1895, but yesterday admitted that he was born a year later. While under oath, as the court learned from private conversation with the woman's daughter, other misstatements were made.

"You ought to be punished," said Judge Porterfield, "for making the false affidavit about your son's age and for other statements made here under oath, but I cannot do it in this court. It could be done in the criminal court, however. This habit people have gotten into of making false affidavits of their children's ages before the factory inspector has got to be broken up. Somebody is going to be punished, too, if it does not cease."

The boy, Lyle, was given into the custody of his sister, Mrs. Iva Hubbard, 1405 Spruce avenue. Mrs. Folson said she had born ten children, seven of whom are living. She said she was divorced from Joseph Wilcox in Oklahoma City, Ok., and that seven years ago in January she was married to Folson.

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December 27, 1909

DREAMS HER STRONG HOBBY.

Mrs. Virginia Gentry, Who Pre-
dicted Steamship Disaster, Is Here.

A woman who says she is the founder of a new sect called the Divine Scientist Healers and predicted the Vallencia disaster in San Francisco in 1906 recently arrived in this city and is living at 1327 Troost avenue. She is Mrs. Virginia Gentry, widow of the late Colonel R. T. Gentry, who commanded a regiment in General Price's army in Missouri and was well known in state politics a score of years ago.

"When my husband died three years ago he left an estate in this vicinity and I am here looking after it," said Mrs. Gentry. "I will probably reside here permanently.

"Most of the talk we hear of people being cured by the laying on of hands is rot. I think Madame Palladino is a faker and I doubt that she can do what she claims she can without pulling wires in one way or another. Maybe that is because her theory of life and things generally differs from mine. My strong hobby is dreams.

"The day before the Vallencia sailed on its fatal cruise I was in San Francisco with my late husband and the captain of the ship was our guest. He told me a dream he had about being stuck in the sand of a desert. Like a flash the inspiration came to me that it was all up with the captain and I told him so. He believed my warning and tried to be excused from the trip."

Mrs. Gentry has the Vallencia flag, an immense piece of woolen bunting. The captain had jokingly promised her that if his ship went down it should be hers and she obtained it from the steamship company by proving that she made the prediction that the good ship would come to grief.

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December 27, 1909

WHO KNOWS MRS. ALICE CONN?

Relatives Wire That Her Mother Is
Dead in Wichita.

"Try and locate Mrs. Alice Conn, wife of Fred Conn. Mother is dead. EDNA K. YOUNG."

This telegram was received last evening from Wichita, Kas., by Chief of Police Frank Snow. But Mrs. Alice Conn is nowhere to be found, either in the directories of the two Kansas Citys or in Argentine. Consequently Chief Snow has asked the papers of the city to assist in the matter and help find the daughter.

If any one knows where Mrs. Alice Conn, or a Fred Conn, live they may confer a great favor on both the young woman and also on the relatives in Wichita.

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December 27, 1909

WEDS A BOY OF SOME CLASS.

Justice Cannot Resist Temptation
as Miss Wade Starts Voyage.

It is said about the recorder's office at the county court house yesterday that there would be few marriage licenses issued, Christmas being over, and that the next rush would come on New Year's. Seventeen pairs took the step yesterday and most of them applied late in the afternoon.

When Charles A. Class, 24 years old, of Leeton, Mo., arrived with his fiancee, Miss Susie Wade, 21 years old of Pleasant Hill, Mo., the office was getting ready to close for the day. It's never too late there however, so a marriage license was issued.

Mr. Class and Miss Wade came with their duly appointed "seconds." Justice Festus O. Miller had to be sent for. When about to start the pair's life voyage he paused for a moment. He could not resist the temptation. "Miss Wade," he said solemnly, "you are about to wed a boy of some 'Class.' "

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December 27, 1909

WAS ONCE A SHEEP HERDER.

Chassino, Master of Shadowgraphy,
Adept With Hands and Feet.

One of the most delightful parlor amusements for winter evenings is the making of shadows or silhouettes upon screens with the aid of a lamp or candle. Men upon the stage have attained fame and fortune by their expertness in casting shadows. Proficiency, however, comes only through long practice and the application of originality and imagination.

Chassino, a Frenchman, who stands in the front rank of shadowgraphers of the world and who closed a week's engagement at the Orpheum theater last night, says that he was obliged to work ten years before he was able to secure contracts in the theaters. An ordinary sheep herder on the hills and in the valleys of France was Chassino when he first saw a shadowgrapher at a church festival. So infatuated was he with the art that he immediately commenced making shadows for his own amusement.

Gradually becoming adept, he appeared at a village social, but it was ten years later when he found his art remunerative. Now he is able to command fancy salaries and has an act always welcomed in the largest vaudeville houses of both Europe and America.

Chassino not only casts shadows of various kinds of animals and human faces with his hands on the canvas, but he is the only artist known who can shadowgraph with his feet. With the aid of his pedal extremities he is able to make shadows representing clearly and plainly various designs of vases and fancy pottery.

Probably the most remarkable feature of his work in this line is the enacting of a whole scene in which three characters are seen in an interesting comedy sketch, which invariably brings rounds of applause. The scene has every appearance of a motion picture and when it is exposed that Chassino does the whole stunt with just his two hands wonderment in in evidence all over the house.

In an interview Chassino said:

"The novice at making shadows always experiences great difficulty in mastering the simplicities of the art. It is hard to learn how much one can do with just one finger when making silhouettes. The beginner should first learn how to cast the likeness of a rabbit and then a wolf, both of which are easier than most any other kind of animals. To learn how to use the feet in this work is impossible for most folks, because one must have specially designed feet, if I may use such an expression. My feet are lithe and easily convertible into most any shape and hence I am able to use them in my profession to a good advantage. In fact, my feet earn me several hundred dollars a week."

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December 26, 1909

BEST OATS BRING
BIG HORSE LAUGH.

NEW MEANING GIVEN PHRASE
AT CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
POOR "COBS" AT HALL.

Rules Given Masters and "Black
Beauty" Books Also Distri-
buted by Humane Society.

A new meaning was given yesterday to the "horse laugh." From 1,000 to 1,500 horses in Kansas City not accustomed to a square meal stood in their stalls, free from work and protected from the weather, and munched full portions of the best oats the market affords.

And these horses laughed. It was Christmas day and they were enjoying a Christmas celebration planned especially for them.

The "feed' for poor work horses was given by the Kansas City Humane society as the result of a plan evolved by Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook and Mrs. E. H. Robinson, members of the board of the society.

For the purpose of carrying joy to the hearts of the poor animals which struggle under burdens on the streets of Kansas City every day and which are indifferently fed and kept, largely because of the poverty of their owners, the Humane society purchased a half dozen tons of the best white oats and did the grain up in five and ten pound sacks, giving out these packages to owners of horses whose cases had been investigated by the society and to whom tickets previously had been given.

THOUSAND TICKETS.

About 1,000 of these tickets were given out and sacks of the grain were also given to others who had not received tickets. Provision was also made for still other cases and an automobile furnished by the Kansas City Rapid Motor Transfer company will take "feeds" to the cases which were reported too late to be cared for as were the others.

It was at Convention hall that the Christmas dinners for the poor horses were given out and the committee in charge of the distribution was composed of Mrs. F. D. Hornbrook, J. W. Perkins and E. R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society.

The sacks containing the oats were placed on long tables and when horse owners applied for the "feeds" they were required to present their tickets, give their names and the names of their horses. They were then given the sacks of feed, a tag which they promised to read and a copy of "Black Beauty." Where owners had sick horses they were also given blankets for the disabled animals.

RULES FOR MASTERS.

The tag which each owner promised to read contained this "horse" talk:
"What is good for your horse is good for his master.
Your horse needs good care as well as good food.
Never work your horse when he will not eat.
Water your horse often. Water should always be given fifteen minutes before feeding grain.
Daily grooming will improve the health as well as the looks of your horse.
Give your horses rock salt, and head shelter from the heat.
Economize by feeding good oats and good hay.
Good drivers are quiet, patient and kind, and have little use for a whip..." and so on.

EXAMPLE IS SET.

"This horse dinner means a great deal more than most people think," said Mrs. Hornbrook. "It is intended to show the horse owners that their animals must be cared for and to set an example for them to follow. Some of the papers have made a humorous affair out of it, when it is anything but humorous and has a most humane object.

"It is not intended simply to fill the empty stomach of some poor animal for the time being," said Mr. Weeks, "but is to create a kindly sentiment for dumb animals. We show the horse owners what a sample meal is and that is something some of them know very little about. The ten pounds of oats we give them is a double portion of a standard feed. The owners of all the big fine animals we see hitched to drays on the streets feed their horses five pounds of the best oats at a meal. Along with the oats we give out, we also give the horse owners a copy of 'Black Beauty' and the tag containing advice about the care of horses an d we hope your Christmas dinner for the horses will do good."

To many horse owners, who called for feed at Convention hall between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m., Mr. Weeks, Mrs. Hornbrook and other workers agents of the Humane Society gave good advice. Some of the callers were persons with whom agents of the society had come in contact in their work and there were scores of promises, such as "well, we'll take better care of our horses from now on."

Posted about the corridor in Convention hall yesterday, were copies of new cards issued by the Humane society. They read, "Be kind to your horse. Do not forget his water, feed and shelter."

Christmas day was the most notable day for the poor work horse in the history of Kansas City. No wonder a new meaning was given to the slang expression, a "horse laugh."

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December 26, 1909

DIRECT LINE TO
CITY OF MEXICO.

ORIENT CONTRACTS FOR CONNEC-
TIONS WITH INTERNATIONAL
RAILWAY OF MEXICO.

Work Will Be Started Feb-
ruary 1, and Will Be Com-
pleted by June, 1911.
Kansas City, Mexico & Orient Railway Gets Direct Line to Mexico City.
MAP SHOWING ORIENT LINE TO DEL RIO, WHICH WILL CONNECT WITH THE I. R. OF M. FOR CITY OF MEXICO.

WICHITA, KAS., Dec. 25. -- Announcement was made here today that contracts for the right of way from San Angelo, Tex., to Del Rio, Tex., have been signed by the Orient railroad and the local municipalities and actual work on the construction of a branch to connect with the International Railroad of Mexico will be commenced February 1. This will give Wichita, Kansas City and intermediate shipping points a direct line to the City of Mexico. The contract provides that the road is to be completed June 1st, 1911.

Simultaneously the information was given out here today that the Mexican government has agreed to spend $6,000,000 and a Mexican capitalist $4,000,000 on irrigation projects in Northern Mexico along the line of the International road. Millions of acres there will be transformed into veritable truck beds.

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December 26, 1909

FREE LIQUOR, MANY SCRAPES.

Broken Heads and Knife Wounds
Result of Saloon Celebrations.

The North End saloons last night gave free liquor to their customers. The result is that there were several broken heads, some cutting scrapes, not to speak of the parched throats to come. A few of the Christmas celebrators were given free rides to the emergency hospital.

Edward Evans, 1077 Grand avenue, a dishwasher at Eighth and Main streets, was cut in the chest with a knife. His cheek also was slit, the knife blade entering his neck and barely missing the jugular vein. After being treated at the emergency hospital he was taken to the general hospital.

Only one saloon in Kansas City was known to be closed yesterday. "Wish you all a Merry Christmas. This place will be closed until Monday morning on account of Christmas day."

This is the inscription which greeted the would-be Christmas patrons of Jack Sheehan's saloon, 2340 Grand avenue. So far as is known, this is the only saloon which observed Christmas by closing.

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December 26, 1909

"BURGLAR" SAVED
AS POLICE COME.

Guest Mistaken by Roomers
for Robber, Imprisoned
in Guarded Closet.

"Come to 912 East Ninth street immediately," came a call late last night to police headquarters. "We've got a burglar locked in a closet."

The patrol wagon made a record run, but when it arrived only a crowd of badly frightened men and women roomers were found. There was no burglar.

"It was just one of the roomers," explained one of the crowd. "A man came out here tonight to visit a friend. He stepped out into the hall to look for a water cooler. The man had been drinking, and in his wandering through the dark halls stepped by mistake into a closet. A roomer, seeing the prowler, slipped up behind him and slammed the closet door."

The cry of "burglars" aroused the roomers. While the men rushed about in search of lodge swords and the women went for hat pins, one of the roomers stood guard with a revolver.

"Come out and I'll shoot," warned the guard in night robe, peering around his fortification, a chimney.

The prisoner took a drink. His courage restored, he shouted, "Help," thinking that he himself was the one being held up.

SOLID PHALANX.

The cohorts of the besiegers were now ranged in solid phalanx in front of the closet. There were all sort and manner of weapons. The men felt the edges of their lodge swords, and the women jabbed at supposed burglars, their forms outlined on the wall. The man with the revolver formed the advance line of attack. The rear was brought up by a boarder with a battle ax, used at a masquerade ball in the '60s.

"Help, burglars," came more audibly from the closet.

The friend in a nearby room was attracted by the noise. He came to the hall armed with a .44, not knowing that his guest was in trouble. He lined up behind the rear guard.

"Help, I'm suffocating," came another cry from the closet, this time more insistent and appealing.

GUARD CALLED OFF.

The roomer recognized the voice as that of his guest. The guard of nightie-clad roomers was called off. The guest with the jag was released.

A clanging of bells was heard in the front of the house. A squad of blue-coats came rushing in at the front door.

"Saved," cried the joyful man, emerging from his prison, mopping his brow.

"Stung," answered the chorus of nighties.

The police returned to headquarters empty-handed.

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December 26, 1909

"LEAN" CHRISTMAS FOR COPS.

Only One Exception Was Made to
Order Prohibiting Gifts.

Yesterday, in the annals of the police department, went down as a lean Christmas. It was owing to the order issued by the board of police commissioners shortly after the members went into office last April.

On the official records it reads, "No member of the police force shall give or receive presents." Short and to the point it caused clouds of gloom to settle right around the city hall. This year the patrolman on the beat was forced to wave aside all offers of boxes of cigars, black bottles, etc., and the family turkey was bought from the officer's monthly stipend.

One exception to the rigid rule of the police commissioners was made yesterday, however, and the officer in question is not likely to be called upon to answer for infringement.

On "Battle Roy," known officially as Beat 7 and the roughest beat in the central district, an old shoe string peddler plies his trade. Worn and bent, the old man walked into headquarters last night and asked for Officer Herman Hartman who, for the past five years, has patroled out of headquarters.

"Yes, he saved my life once," he stated to the desk sergeant, Robert Smith. "He pulled me out of the way of a runaway team. I haven't got any money but I would like you to give him this half dozen pair of shoe laces."

The sergeant took the gift and placed it in an envelope for the officer, who is at present a member of the traffic squad and stationed at Eleventh and Walnut streets.

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December 25, 1909

MISS MARGARET MENET DEAD.

End Comes to Former Kansas City
Writer in Washington.

Miss Margaret Menet, formerly of Kansas City, died yesterday at the home of her mother in Washington, D. C. Miss Menet came to Kansas City from Lawrence, Kas., in 1900, to work for The Journal, where she remained until 1905. Miss Menet in that year went to the Washinton Post, remaining in the national capital until the time of her death. She was a pleasing writer, with a graceful literary style. During her connection with The Journal she made many friends to whom the news of her untimely death comes as a distinct shock.

The body will be sent to Lawrence, Kas., and will be buried in the family lot Sunday. Miss Menet's father, who died several years ago, wsa a pioneer resident of Lawrence, Kas. She is survived by a mother and one sister, Mrs. W. J. Frick, wife of Dr. Frick, 812 Benton boulvard, this city.

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December 25, 1909

AN OLD TIME CELEBRATION.

Prisoners at the Municipal Farm
Experienced Real Joy.

Two oranges, two bananas, half a pound of assorted nuts, one dozen cream cakes, a bunch of grapes, and one-half pound box of candy, all inclosed in a neatly decorated basket, is what the Christmas season brought each prisoner at the municipal farm, a mile and a half southeast of Leeds, last night.

A large Christmas tree, decorated in tinsel and Christmas bells, just like the Sunday school trees, was fitted up in the big farm house last night. A real live Santa Claus, with his customary tonsorial makeup, dressed in a red and white suit, presided over the tree and distributed the Christmas baskets.

Tonight for entertainment will be proved for the prisoners. Among the numbers on the programme will be "Semi Dempsy," a one-act comedy with three characters; "Pills of Merriment," a two-act farce introducing six characters; "The Oklahoma Traveler," a burlesque by Dowd McDonald, Dood and Jones, a negro team, and songs and dancing. A stage with elaborate settings, spot lights, hand-painted scenery, and all necessary adjuncts was constructed by the prisoners.

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December 25, 1909

8,000 KIDS YELL
SANTA GREETINGS.

POLICE IN BATTLE ROYAL WHEN
GIFTS ARE ANNOUNCED AS
READY FOR CHILDREN.

Officials of Mayor's Christ-
mas Tree Well Pleased
With Its Success.

Santa Claus, the magnanimous patron saint of good will, was the hero of the hour in Convention hall yesterday afternoon when 8,000 needy, little children were happy objects of his unbounded generosity.

For the second time the mayor's annual Christmas tree was brought forth loaded with playthings and goodies for the poor youngsters, who otherwise would not know of the joys of the giving spirit of the Yuletide. Every child, irrespective of color or race, was made the recipient of a sack filled with things that gladden the juvenile heart.

By 2 o'clock the bill hall was crowded with boys and girls from every portion of the city, and for fully an hour the expectant thousands were entertained by a band organ, furnished by the Hippodrome, and a clown band which marched about the hall playing the most tuneless tunes imaginable, but doing antics that amused all.

Mayor T. T. Crittenden was slated for a speech, but in the attempt failed, owing to the impossibility of inducing the anxious auditors to desist in their yelling. However, the mayor was able to yell "A Merry Christmas" occasionally during the distribution of presents, and this laconic well-wishing accomplished all that could be asked, for every child left the hall with smiling faces which revealed the joyousness they were experiencing.

MAYOR SATISFIED.

"Isn't this going some?" smiled the mayor as he took a view of the remarkable scene. "Just so every one of these poor children get something, I will be satisfied. It is a grand sigh and a gloriouis manifestation of the great Kansas City spirit, which we all love to see.

"It's a greater success than ever," declared Steve Sedweek, a member of the executive committee. "It is one of the biggest charitable undertakings in the country to care for so many needy children, and I am sure the whole committee feels gratified in noting the remarkable demonstrations in evidence here this afternoon."

At times during the big event it was not an easy task to keep the guests properly marooned for their own safety and comfort. Every child present wanted to get his or her present first and the police, under the direction of Sergeant Charles Edwards, had their troubles, but handled the crowds well. Most of the officers present were attired in Santa Claus make-up. In fact, Saint Nick was there six times strong in the persons of Jack Darnell, S. F. Cox, James F. Campbell, A. D. Royer, Joe McCormick and Elvin Gray.

The idea of having a mayor's tree for the poor children every Christmas was conceived by Steve Sedweek, who outlined his plan at an Eagle banquet over a year ago. Mayor Crittenden forthwith promulgated the scheme, and now the affair is to be annual and of increasing success, no doubt.

Yesterday afternoon there were representatives from twelve different cities of the Middle West present to witness the distribution of gifts to the poor. These men came with the view of seeing how Kansas City made its needy ones happy on Christmas and to take the idea back home in the hopes of starting the same kind of wide-spread charity. The mayor's tree is strictly a Kansas City institution and bids fair to be in vogue in many other cities ere many years.

POLICE WERE BUSY.

It was no easy matter even for a dozen military policemen under the careful personal direction of their drill master, Sergeant Charles Edwards, to keep the 8,000 children in their places in the hall yesterday when the line was formed for the distribution of presents. Between boxes, in which the visitors sat, and the gallery seats, where those really interested in the affair were penned in, was a four-foot fence of iron. It did not look very high to the boys, but it looked even smaller to the cops. To the latter it looked infinitely long, however, for at the first call for gifts a scrambling mass of children swept over it, inundating the boxes below and surging out into the hall. For a space of a minute the line seemed actually in danger. The policemen rushed forward, brandishing their clubs and shouting. A dozen members of the reception committee joined hands and formed a wall near the threatened quarter. The mayor raised his deep bass voice in mild disapproval.

Just then, at the crucial moment, the reserves threw their ponderous weight into the fray and the regiments of insurgents broke for cover like the old guard in the rout of Waterloo. The victorious newcomers were the six big officers doing duty as Santa Claus close to the Christmas trees and their tinsel had a better moral effect than the regulation uniforms or the white committee badges. There were no youngsters in that host who wanted to endanger their good standing with St. Nicholas and his assistants. Not much!

There was just one way in which gifts were classified according to the age of the child receiving them yesterday. The presents were in flour sacks, each bearing the label, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." On the sacks containing gifts calculated for older children the letters were printed in blue, while on the others they were in red. There were eighteen persons at each "gift bench" handing out the sacks.

MOURNER'S BENCHES FOR THE LOST.

A great number of visitors at the mayor's Christmas party wondered why two long benches ere arranged alongside the trees. They were told by ushers that these were the mourners' benches. This was proved to be true later in the day when children who had somehow got lost from their parents or elders lined up from one end to the other. Two little girls, Edith Shoemaker, 2311 Euclid avenue, and Menie Marcus, who said she lived near Eighteenth and McGee streets, were prominent among the mourners.

Edith's tear-stained face and Menie's extraordinary composure seemed to attract the attention of everyone. They had never seen each other before, but they were two lost little girls whose ages were on the tender side of 10 years, and in that circumstance there was union. With arms locked about each other's neck, they sat for an hour until Mayor Crittenden personally took charge of Edith, and Jacob Billikopf of Menie, and sent them home, loaded with presents.

Two wagon loads of toys arrived at the hall after the crowd had been treated and were only partially disposed of. The sum of the donations for the tree amounted to $4,880. It was announced last night by Albert Hutchins, chairman of the finance committee, that $200 of the money has not been used. The presents remaining after yesterday will be distributed at the Grand theater Monday night.

Several instances of highway robbery, in which large boys despoiled smaller ones of their trinkets or tickets were reported to the committee of distribution during the afternoon.

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December 25, 1909

MOTHER COULDN'T MEET HIM.

Claud Bullus, 15 Years Old, Learns
She Is Dead.

One year ago Claud Bullus, now 15 years old, was sent by W. G. Leeman, probation officer of Dallas, Tex., to the boys' industrial school at Nashville, Tenn. A few days ago the officials of the school received a letter from Mr. Leeman containing a ticket and a request that Bullus be allowed to go to Kansas City to spend Christmas with his mother. When the boy arrived in Kansas City night before last he found that his mother had died of tuberculosis at the old general hospital a month ago.

Claud tells a pitiful story. Six years ago he lived in Chicago with his father and mother and two other brothers. The father and mother separated and that is the last he has heard of his father. His oldest brother, Thomas, joined the navy while the mother and other two boys went to Fort Worth, Tex., where her sister resided. They lived with her four months and then went to Dallas where the boys worked at different jobs to support the mother.

About a year ago the mother and her son, Robert, now 18 years old, went to Denver, Col. Claud remained in Dallas and was sent with twelve other boys to the industrial school in Nashville, Tenn. He received a letter once a week from his mother while she was in Denver. About four months ago she and Robert came to Kansas City, where the mother worked as a domestic until she became ill and was taken to the hospital.

Instead of spending a happy Christmas with the mother and brother, Claud will spend the day as he did yesterday, looking for his brother Robert, whom he thinks is still in Kansas City. The boy is being cared for at the old general hospital, where he will remain until he finds his brother or secures a position.

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December 25, 1909

TWO WREATHS OF HOLLY.

Outward Evidence of Christmas at
Union Depot.

Two wreaths of holly -- one over Matron Ollie Everingham's desk and the other in the sick room -- was the only evidence at the dingy Union depot last night of the fact that it was Christmas eve. The crowd, good natured and unusually large, packed bundles and and parcels and exchanged Christmas greetings. The exchange of presents by employes at the depot was accomplished under difficulties, made so by the unusually heavy travel this year. There were two places where the fact that it was Christmas eve was apparent. These were the Bell and Home telephone exchanges. The pretty girl operators were fairly loaded up with boxes of candy.

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December 24, 1909

GAS COMPLETES RUIN
OF RIALTO BUILDING.

FLAMES UNDER CONTROL WHEN
MAIN BREAKS, EXPLODING.

Firemen Grope Way to Street as
Third Roar Is Heard and Fire
Raging for Hours, Leaves
Only Ice-Coated Walls.
Fire and Explosion Destroy the Rialto Building.
CHARRED WALLS OF THE RIALTO BUILDING, ALL THAT REMAINS OF A "FIRE TRAP."

Flames fed by a broken gas main destroyed the Rialto building at the southwest corner of Grand avenue and Ninth street at 3:30 o'clock yesterday morning. The building was erected in 1887 by Albert Marty, its present owner. The fire started in the basement and raged virtually unchecked for three hours until everything inflammable had been consumed. Nothing remains but the ruined and ice-coated walls. The loss is estimated at $300,000.

The building was one of the few remaining big Kansas City fire traps which are a terror to the fire department. Almost entirely of frame construction inside, it burned like tinder. In the language of Assistant Chief Alex Henderson, "not all the fire companies in Missouri could have stopped it."

The fire was noticed first by J. W. Johnson, a negro janitor, who had for many years been a fixture in the building. Johnson was sitting in one of the offices on the second floor at 3 o'clock in the morning, when he was startled by a rumbling sound like the report of a muffled cannon. He jumped from the chair in which he had been resting after several hours of hard work in policing the building, and bounded down the stairway.

He was confronted by dense smoke, and forgetting everything but that there were several person in the building who were in imminent danger of losing their lives, he bounded up the steps and shouted fire from each landing. In this manner he aroused Dr. J. W. Gaines, Dr. Robert O. Gross, Dr. Emil Thielman, Dr. Oliver F. Jones, Dr. A. Talbot, Dr. B. E. Jordan, Dr. J. B. Jones and Dr. Frank Jones. On the fifth floor Johnson came upon Charles R. Manley, senior physical examiner of the Y. M. C. A., in a semi-conscious condition, the result of striking his head against a post in his efforts to escape while groping his way through the dark, smoke-filled hallways. Johnson himself was beginning to feel the effects of the smoke, but not thinking of his own life in his efforts to save others half carried and dragged Mr. Manley down the stairway and out into the streets to safety. In the meantime, A. E. Perrine, night watchman in the building of McGowan, Small & Morgan, gas grantees, which is the first building south of the Rialto, discovered smoke and noticing the glare of flames which by that time had gained considerable headway in the trunk factory, hastened to a telephone and turned in the alarm.

FIRE FIGHT BEGINS.

The fire department soon was on the scene. The fire at first looked to be easy to extinguish. The firemen had the flames smothered, when a terrific explosion, caused by the breaking of a gas main, shot the flames up through the building to the top floors. At the time of this explosion Assistant Chief Alex Henderson and a squad of men were on the first floor of the building. The force of the explosion shook the entire building and as the flames were spreading to all parts of the structure, it was as much as a man's life was worth to stay inside, as another explosion could be expected at any time. While Chief Henderson and his men were extricating themselves from the trap, Captain Pelletier, with several men, were groping their way about in the basement of the Ninth street entrance. In what seemed to be hours, they emerged through the smoke and debris into the street. It was none too soon, as the third explosion occurred a few minutes later and had any of the firemen remained in the building they would have been buried beneath the floors and walls. By this time twenty companies had arrived and were throwing streams of water into the burning building from all sides, but it was of no use. The interior of the building was mostly wood and the outside wall kept the streams from getting to the center of the building, where the fire was worst.

The Rialto was the only old-time building of any consequence on Grand avenue. Albert Marty, the owner, is an active real estate and building man of Kansas City. He purchased the ground in 1886 and in 1887 constructed a five-story building on the corner. In 1889 he purchased forty-eight feet on the south side of the corner lot and the same year erected the south half of the building which burned yesterday morning.

The building was occupied by many prominent physicians and dentists, some of whom have been in the building twenty-five years.

"The number of occupants is in the neighborhood of 100," said Dr. H. D. McQuade, who had offices in the building for many years. "Many of us will be up against it for offices for some time, but I expect to contract for offices on the fifth floor of the Keith & Perry building tomorrow. Many of us received offers from other physicians to share their offices while looking for locations."

VALUED AT $125,000.

The building was valued at $125,000, although at the time of its erection it cost in the neighborhood of $200,000. That was more than twenty years ago. There was $81,500 insurance carried on the structure. The heaviest loser among the occupants was Hugo A. Brecklein, a druggist, occupying the first floor. Mr. Brecklein estimated his loss at $20,000, with $12,000 insurance.

J. H. Langan, son of John P. Langan, a grocer at 4601 Independence avenue, was walking north on Grand avenue yesterday morning when the fire started, and in attempting to awaken some of the men who were sleeping in the offices, he broke the glass in one of the doors, severely cutting his hand. But he saved the life of a man who was sleeping through all the disturbance, and succeeded in helping him to the street.

At least sixty physicians and twenty dentists lost their office furnishings and instruments in the Rialto building fire yesterday. The average loss for each tenant is said to have been about $700, and that only a small part of it was covered by insurance.

For years the Rialto has been the doctors' office building of Kansas City. Many of the most prominent physicians of the city were established there. Owing to the fact that in many buildings dentists and physicians are not allowed to rent offices, because the odors arising form the mixtures of medicines is objected to by other tenants, this building has long been recognized as the headquarters of men engaged in these two professions.

VALUABLE RELICS LOST.

About 1,000 specimens of prehistoric stone implements and two ancient violins were cherished treasures of Dr. A. H. Cordier, which were lost in the Rialto fire. Dr. Cordier occupied room 310, third floor.

A collector of prehistoric implements, Dr. Cordier, on trips to Mexico, Alaska, Ohio, Kentucky, Arkansas and through Missouri, got several thousand specimens, and he had about 1,000 of them on display in his offices. His is a collector of old violins and had two of these instruments, which he prized highly, in his rooms. Another relic which Dr. Cordier lost was the mounted head of a mountain sheep which he shot while on a hunting trip in British Columbia. Dr. Cordier's office had been in the Rialto building eighteen years.

DR. ANDERSON LUCKY.

A long distance survey of the Rialto ruins makes it appear that Dr. R. V. Anderson, a dentist, is the only tenant of the burned structure whose effects were not destroyed, and he recalls the fact that once before in a fire in the Rialto building he also was lucky.

Dr. Anderson's office has been in the building nearly eighteen years, ever since he began to practice, and some years ago ago fire broke out beneath his office, and his rooms, enveloped in smoke and flame, seemed doomed. The firemen, however, extinguished the blaze before his effects suffered any serious damage.

ORDINANCE NOT ENFORCED.

At the burning of the Rialto building yesterday morning the firemen were greatly handicapped by dangers from exploding gas, and they were in continual danger of being burned by flame of escaping gas. Had the building been equipped with a Siebens' shut-off gas valve it would have been possible for the firemen the moment they reached the fire to turn off the gas in the entire building and thereby lessen the danger occasioned by the escaping gas. The building code requires the installation of gas shut-off devices on all buildings, but for some reason the ordinance has never been enforced.

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December 24, 1909

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS
TREE IS ALL READY.

CANDY AND TOYS FOR THOU-
SANDS OF CHILDREN.

Convention Hall Doors Will Swing
Open at 1 o'clock Today to
Admit the Eager
Youngsters.

Nimble fingers, hastened and made dexterous by kind hearts, effected a transformation in Convention hall yesterday, and today the great auditorium is a Santa Claus land for the poor children of Kansas City. At 1 o'clock this afternoon the doors of the hall will swing open for the mayor's Christmas tree, and at 2:30 they will close, while Santa Claus distributes Christmas presents to at least 7,000 little boys and girls who, by force of circumstances, might otherwise have had no Christmas.

Notwithstanding unceasing efforts, the committees of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association have been unable to locate all the poor children in the city to give them the tickets which are necessary to entitle them to gifts, and these children who have been overlooked are asked to apply at Convention hall this morning from 8 o'clock until noon. Tickets will be supplied these children any time between those hours.

The Fraternal Order of Moose caught the Christmas spirit in earnest yesterday and notified the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association that it would have twenty-five wagon loads of coal at Convention hall at noon today for distribution among poor families. Each wagon will contain two tons of coal.

WORKED ALL DAY.

Poor families who need fuel are requested to notify the mayor's office by 'phone or in person up to 11 o'clock this morning. These cases will be investigated and if the applicants be found worthy the coal will be delivered at their homes at noon. The offer from the Order of Moose was made by W. A. McGowan, secretary of the local lodge.

That the Convention hall association is heart and soul in the Christmas tree project was shown when Manager Louis W. Shouse and the directors placed the whole Convention hall force at the disposal of the Christmas Tree Association. As soon as the railroad ball was over Wednesday night, Manager Shouse put a force of men to work taking up the dance floor and before 6 o'clock yesterday morning the building was ready for the decorating committees of the Christmas tree.

Steve Sedweek was the first of the association workers to appear on the scene. He arrived at 6 o'clock and within a short time a large force was at work, setting up the Christmas trees, decorating them and packing the gifts into sacks ready for distribution. The committees worked all day and this morning they will have the hall ready for the great event.

That the people of Kansas City may inspect the work of the "best fellows" a general invitation is extended to any who care to do so to stop into the hall during the morning hours, up to noon today.

THE GIFTS IN SACKS.

Among the busy people at the hall yesterday were Captain John F. Pelletier, A. E. Hutchings, Steve Sedweek, Captain W. A. O'Leary, Hank C. Mank, the Rev. Thomas Watts, Gus Zorn and a Mr. Bennett of Wichita, who is here to gain ideas for a similar event to be inaugurated in his city next year.

Among the most valued workers were the members of the committee of twenty. Their duties consisted of the packing and arranging of the gifts in sacks. They worked from early morning till late at night and ate luncheon and dinner in the hall. Mayor T. T. Crittenden was present at the luncheon and sat at the head of the table, commending the women for their work.

The workers were assisted by seven men from No. 6 hook and ladder company, Thirty-first and Holmes, detailed for the duty by Fire Chief John C. Egner. Chief Egner had intended detailing twenty men, but the fire in the Rialto building made it impossible for him to do so.

The giant Christmas trees, which will be among the objects of chief interest to the children, were decorated in magnificent fashion by the employes of the Kansas City Electric Light Company and the Webb-Freyschlag Mercantile Company.

The presents for the children will be arranged in sacks bearing the inscription, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." The sacks for the boys will be placed on the east side of the arena and those of the girls on the west side. The sacks for children up to 8 years of age are printed in blue and those of children from 8 to 12 are printed in red.

Each child will receive two suitable toys and candy, nuts and fruit, all arranged in Christmas style.

A CLOWN BAND, TOO.

The programme for the mayor's Christmas tree will be a simple one. The doors will open at 1 o'clock, when the children can come in to feast their eyes upon the great Christmas trees and enjoy a fine musical entertainment. The doors will close at 2:30, so that it will be necessary for the tots to be in the hall by that time.

Preceding the distribution of the presents, the Eagles' clown band will give a dress concert on the arena and a large electrical organ will also furnish music. Old Santa Claus, who, it is said, resembles very much in appearance Captain John F. Pelletier, will be present and he will have six assistants with him to mingle among the children. At 2:30 o'clock Santa will introduce Mayor T. T. Crittenden, who will make a short talk, and the presents will then be distributed.

"We have plenty of funds and plenty of gifts for all the city's poor children," said A. E. Hutchings, "and if they do not come and get their share it will not be the fault of the committees, which have labored incessantly to get in touch with every child entitled to the pleasures of the tree."

Although it was announced that no more funds were needed, and that no further cash donations would be received, the financial committee of the association was forced to decline donations yesterday to the amount of several hundred dollars.

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December 24, 1909

PUBLIC SCHOOLS CLOSED.

Will Not Reopen Until Monday Fol-
lowing New Year's Day.

The public schools of Kansas City closed yesterday for the Christmas vacation and will not re-open until the Monday following New Year's day. In the kindergarten schools and in some of the other grades of the various schools, Christmas exercises were held yesterday and as a rule the kindergarten pupils were given little remembrances by their teaches and each other and were presented with small sacks of candy.

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December 24, 1909

TEXAN SUSPSECTED OF
KANSAS CITY MURDER.

M'CLINTOCK DUNLAP'S SLAYER
MIGHT BE DALHART MAN.

Clyde Charles Confesses He Killed
Kansan Near Larned -- Says He
Was With Restaurant Em-
ploy Here Oct. 18.

LARNED, KAS., Dec. 23. -- Clyde Charles, confessed murderer of George B. Neptune of Larned, now is suspected of the murder of Mark Dunlap, a Dalhart man, at Kansas City, October 18. Alfus H. Moffet, of the Moffet National bank, and Jake Garmater, both of Larned, are in Dalhart making examination and recovering stolen property that belonged to Neptune.

Neptune was killed at his farm home near Larned September 18, soon after Charles shipped a number of his horses and other property to Dalhart. He then went to Kansas City, where he spent several days.

Charles and Dunlap met in Kansas City. They had known each other before. Dunlap had been working in a restaurant in Dalhart. He was well liked. His life was insured for $1,000. Charles, two other men and Du nlap were known to have been together in Kansas City a few nights before Dunlap was killed.

CAME WITH CATTLE.

Dunlap went to Kansas City with a car of cattle. He had $100. Charles, who acknowledged that he was with Dunlap at the time of the killing, claimed that four men had rushed out of an alley and one had struck Dunlap. He says the men made no attempt to rob. He also claims that Dunlap did not have any money.

Charles told the same story at Dalhart, although the restaurant keeper where Dunlap had worked claimed that Dunlap had more than $120 when he started. Charles's sister, however, corroborated Charles in the statement that Dunlap had no money when he was in the city. How she knew is not known.

It is thought t hat there was a plan to get the life insurance money by some means. But this theory is now disregarded as it is the belief that the man was murdered for the small sum of money he had.

At Larned the officials today are "sweating Charles. Charles confessed to the Neptune killing, but has as yet refused to divulge anything more.

Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle thinks that Clyde Charles, sentenced to a life term in the Kansas penitentiary for the murder of George B. Neptune at Larned, Kas., is the man who killed Mark Dunlap in Kansas City on October 18.

Dunlap met his death in a fist fight at Sixth and Main streets. Many passersby saw the killing. The police were able to obtain a very accurate description of the man who struck the blow, and officers who worked on the case says that it coincides with the description of Charles, which has been given out by the Kansas authorities.

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December 23, 1909

CENTRAL HIGH STUDENTS
PRESENT "THE RIVALS."

Large Audience Enjoys Comedy as
Staged by Dramatic Club -- Cast
Scores Distinct Success.

With "The Rivals," by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, as a vehicle, the members of the Dramatic Club of the Central high school trod the boards behind the footlights last evening with a good deal of ease and a large degree of success. The play was well staged, well costumed, the youthful Thespians well trained for their parts and the assembly hall of the high school building well filled for the occasion. The high school orchestra, under the direction of Professor Thomas of the musical department of the schools, deserves special mention.

"The Rivals" is well adapted to the work of amateurs and sparkles with humor and wit from beginning to end. The young people didn't lose much, if any, of this and sometimes in true professional style not only emphasized the points of the jokes in the play but saw to it that the lines immediately following were not lost.

The cast was selected on the merit basis. Preliminaries were held at different times during the fall term and those excelling took part in the final exhibition. Special mention should be made of the work of David Hawkins, William H. Powell, Charles H. Davis, Miss Lola Earle Eaton and Miss Gertrude Wood. However, all did good work and deserve much credit.

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December 24, 1909

GAVE THE MAYOR A CAKE.

City Hall Employes Remember His
Forty-Sixth Birthday.

Mayor Crittenden admits that he was 46 years old yesterday. His official family and close personal friends took advantage of the occasion to present him with an ornamented cake weighing twenty-five pounds. It was pyramidal and decorated with cupids, bon bons, and images of flying doves. The pyramid was shaped as a bouquet holder, and this was filled with American Beauty roses, ferns and delicate plants. At the base of the cake forty-six miniature candles were set in the open petals of lillies of the valley.

While the mayor was absent in another part of city hall the cake was smuggled into his private office, and when he returned he was greeted by a host of friends, and Frank Lowe made a facetious speech of presentation, and the mayor responded as well as his embarrassment would permit.

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December 23, 1909

THREE FIREMEN INJURED.

Early Morning Run Disastrous
Both to Men and Horse.

Three firemen were painfully hurt and one horse injured so badly that he had to be shot yesterday morning when hose wagon No. 3 was making a run to a fire at the city market. The fire started in the kitchen on the second floor of Julius J. Blake's restaurant, 25 city market.

As No. 3 hose wagon with two horses attched was making the turn at Tenth street and Baltimore avenue the wagon bounded into a five foot excavation. The great speed caused the wagon to bounce out again with such force that Captain M. E. Gaffey, Lieutenant George Monahan and W. L. Grooms, the driver, were thrown from the wagon. The horses were badly frightened, and ran east on Tenth street to Main where they collided with a trolley pole, which threw both to the ground. One horse was uninjured, but "Buffalo," who had been in the department since 1901, suffered a broken leg, and had to be killed.

Captain Gafffey was cut on the forehead and Lieutenant Monahan's right leg was sprained while Grooms, the driver, got off with a sprained shoulder. The injured men were helped back to the fire station where they were attended by Dr. C. E. Wilson. All are expected to be able to resume their duties within a few days.

It was estimated that $1,500 would cover the damage to the fixtures and loss on the building.

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December 23, 1909

FOR 27 YEARS A HOTEL MAID.

Death Ends Margaret Sullivan's
Long Service at Coates House.

Margaret Sullivan, 65 years old, maid in charge of the parlor floor of the Coates house for twenty-seven years, died at St. Joseph's hospital yesterday morning of pneumonia.

Among her effects in the room at the Coates house which she occupied almost continuously while employed there, were found some papers indicating that she left a considerable estate. It is known about the hotel that she lost a large sum of money in a bank failure ten or twelve years ago. At that time sh e told the housekeeper that she would not deposit another cent in a bank, but this resolve was forgotten, for it developed yesterday that she had a certificate of deposit in the National Bank of Commerce for several hundred dollars. Just what her estate amounts to will not be known until the arrival of her two sisters, Mrs. C. R. Helbing of Grand Crossing, near Chicago, and Miss M. Sullivan of Ogdensburg, N. Y. Mrs. Helbing wired the hotel people yesterday afternoon that she would arrive this morning.

Quiet and unassuming, Miss Sullivan worked steadily day after day, never allowing herself a vacation and making herself a veritable fixture in the first big hotel of Kansas City. She would not allow an y of the other maids to assist her and was on duty regularly.

"It is supposed that Miss Sullivan had some money when she came here," said Manager Firey of the Coates house yesterday afternoon. "She received $25 a month and her board, room and laundry. She was of simple tastes and I suppose saved much fore than her salary, for the parlor floor is supposed to be worth something in the shape of gratuities to the maids, as well as to the bellboys. Her death is regretted by everyone attached to the hotel who knew her."

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December 23, 1909

OWNS 4-YEAR-OLD BUFFALO.

Frank Lemen, Only Missourian to
Possess Big Quadruped.

Frank Lemen, the showman, enjoys the distinction of being the only personal owner of a buffalo in this section of Missouri. He has a 4-year-old cow buffalo on his farm near the Little Blue, and he made a proposition to sell it to the city for the Swope park zoo prior to the presentation of two of this rare variety of animals to the park board.

The buffalo now in the possession of Mr. Lemen is one of two he had with the Lemen Bros.' show. A year ago one of the buffalo became savage and unmanageable, and to keep it from harming itself it had to be killed.

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December 23, 1909

NO BOYS IN DETENTION HOME.

Inmates Released to Allow Them a
Merry Christmas.

There is not a boy in the detention home. The youthful prisoners have all been released on the promise to report Monday in juvenile court.

"This has been our custom every year the week before Christmas," said Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer, yesterday. "We want every boy in town, however bad, to be given a chance to celebrate Christmas day. There will be as few arrests as possible this week."

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December 22, 1909

ROLLER WINNER IN
HANDICAP MATCH.

HAD BETTER OF HOUR BOUT
WITH ZBYSZKO.

Offensive Work Better Than That
of Polish Giant, Who Thinks
He Can Win in Finish
Match.
Dr. Benjamin Franklin Roller.Stanislaus Zbyszko, the Polish Giant
DR. B. F. ROLLER FROM SEATTLE AND ZBYSZKO, THE "POLISH GIANT."

BY DR. B. F. ROLLER: "Zbyszko is a powerful wrestler and can beat most of them in a finish match, but I do not believe he can beat Gotch or myself. He has a powerful grip and his legs are like posts. It is almost impossible to get a toe hold on him. Gotch will do it and will win. Zbyszko looks like about the best wrestler among the gang of foreigners who came to this country."

BY ZBYSZKO: "I can beat Roller in a finish match. He gouged the eyes and was unnecessarily rough, but I will beat him in a finish match."

Zbyszko, the Polish Giant wrestler, had about as much a chance to throw Dr. B. F. Roller twice in an hour in their match in Convention hall last night as Stanley Ketchel had to knock out Jack Johnson in the first round of their battle in Frisco. It was an hour handicap affair and had the referee been empowered to give a decision on points at theclose of the bout it would undoubtedly have been in favor of the Seattle physician. Neither won a fall and as Zbyszko failed to throw Roller twice in an hour the doctor won.

Roller and Zbyszko Go Head to Head.
IT WAS A HEAD TO HEAD MATCH MOST OF THE TIME.

From the very tap of the ringer Roller really had the better of the battle Zbyszko's strength was so great that he could push Roller about on the mat, but he had better holds on the Polish Giant than were put on the physician. Roller was much cleverer in dodging and breaking away from holds and his agressive work was far better than that of the Pole. But once did Zbyszko have a good hold on the ph ysician and Roller broke it with ease. Twice Roller had holds on Zbyszko which looked good for falls and one of them, a reverse half Nelson, all but brought home the money. Zbyszko had a hard fight to break the hold.

ROLLER'S STRONG OFFENSIVE.

While working on the mat Zbyszko was on the aggressive four times and Roller was on the agressive the same number. It was even as far as that was concerned, although Roller's offensive work appeared to be better than the Pole's. Roller tried for the toe hold all of hte time, except in one instance and that time he got a reverse half Nelson which looked good for a fall but the power of the giant from Poland broke it. Zbyszko tried for the toe hold and for arm and head holds, but only once had Roller in a dangerous position with a half Nelson, which was quickly broken. Several times during the bout Roller broke away from the Pole and regained his feet when Zbyszko held him around the waist. It was apparently easy for either man to get up out of the grasp of his opponent. For this reason much of the wrestling was while both were standing.

Rolling the Dough out of Zybszko the Biscuit)
DR. ROLLER TOOK THE DOUGH OUT OF THE BISCUIT, ALL RIGHT.

While Zbyszko was considerably heavier than Roller his work did not show it except when the men were tussling about the ring, both on their feet.

After thirteen minutes of work Zbyzsko got Roller to the mat for just a second when Roller broke away and again both were standing. Twenty minutes had been consumed when Roller put the Pole to the mat and got up again. Three minutes more passed and Zbyzsko downed Roller but the physician got up without much exertion. When twenty-six minutes of the hour had passed Roller picked the Pole up by the left leg and dropped him to the canvas. He tried the toe hold time and again but the short, stocky legs of the Pole were too strong. After thirty-seven minutes on the mat Zbyszko got up and got Roller around the waist but the clever physician broke away again.

ZBYSZKO'S HOLDS WEAK.

Forty minutes of wrestling found Zbyszko on top again and he took a half Nelson hold which looked good. The Seattle man gave a strain and not only broke the hold but regained his feet. The Pole got rough but he found a good oponent at that game in the physician, who, according to Zbyszko, amused himself by trying to misplace the Pole's eyes and nose.

After forty-five minutes of wrestling it was apparent that Roller would win the match as he had the advantage. He picked the Polish athlete up by the leg and dropped him to the mat. Zbyszko turned him over and they were soon standing again. When fifty-one minutes had passed Roller went after Zbyszko like a tiger. He threw him to the mat and got a reverse Nelson, which took all of Zbyszko's strength to break. Zbyszko got on top again after a hard tussle and Roller got up. The bout finished with the wrestlers sparring in a rough manner.

In the semi-windup Ed Somers defeated George Weber in straight falls. Both were one legged wrestlers. Dave Porteous refereed.

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December 22, 1909

HIS GOOD CHEER PERENNIAL.

Gray Haired Elevator Operator the
Original "Sunny Jim."

"To You All a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year."

This little inscription, signed "Elevator Man, Merry Building," is the way L. G. Chase, the gray-haired man on the lift expresses his sentiments of good cheer to his friends and patrons. The cards bearing greetings of the season are pinned on the sides of the elevator at the Merry building, 1009-11 Walnut street, embedded in a mass of Christmas greens and holiday emblems.

Every Christmas t his gray-haired elevator man enters into the spirit of the season and decorates his car in a lavish manner. This season he has done better than before. With streamers of tinsel, which are entwined around Christmas bells, fern wreaths, holly bells and little bits of mistletoe here and there, Mr. Chase has transformed his little elevator from a simple black iron cage to one of holiday beauty.

But it is not only at this season of the year that the passengers in the Merry building elevator find a plethora of good cheer, for the man who runs the elevator has the same sunny disposition the year round.

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December 22, 1909

TOYS THAT ATTRACT
GROWN-UPS, BOUGHT.

BIG DEPARTMENT STORES ARE
OPEN EVENINGS THIS WEEK.

Crowds Down Town at Night -- Fire
Department Playthings Most
Popular, Patrol Wagons
and Aeroplanes Next.

The announcement posted early that most of the big department stores would be open evenings this week up to Friday night inclusive brought the usual Christmas crowds to the down town districts last night in all the stores people who had braved the crisp winter air to be present with their shopping bags meant business.

The department stores which did not open last night were Emery, Bird, Thayer's, John Taylor's and Bernheimer's. The music stores did not close and while the crowds in them were only comfortably dense their sales were large from the viewpoint of the money taken in.

Some of the heavy sellers among toys last night were mechanical fire department outfits, patrol wagons and flying machines of different patterns.

Fire engines and hose wagons, toy salesmen say, have always been favorites. This is because a fire is spectacular and exciting and inviting to the imagination of old and young people alike. A child is most apt to get the toy in his stocking Christmas Eve that his elders enjoy and appreciate, they say, and so the manufacturers try to please both. Patrol wagons have always sold next to fire apparatus until this year.

Now they are running a distant third with miniatures of Wright's invention in full working order and capable of making short flights running close to first.

The theory of all toy shopmen interviewed last night was that little boys and girls might appreciate a good many gifts more than a flying machine, but that their parents, brothers, sisters and other relatives are anxious to see how the machine works.

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December 22, 1909

WENT WITHOUT HIS MEALS.

That's a Traffic Policeman's Allega-
tion in Suit for Divorce.

William F. Heckenberg, a traffic policeman, has filed suit for divorce against Grace E. Heckenberg, alleging violent fits of temper and occasional absence from home when the officer went without meals.

The Heckenbergs have been married twenty years and have three children, a boy of 19, a girl of 8 and a boy of 5 years. The officer asks for the custody of the younger ones. He alleges that the older boy is kept at home assisting with the housework while his wife insists on working down town, against his will, thereby keeping her away from home much of the time. The case is set for the January term of the court.

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December 21, 1909

POGUE RETURNED TO PRISON.

Escaped From Lansing Penitentiary
in 1906, Surrendered Voluntarily.

James G. Pogue, who surrendered to the Kansas City, Kas., police and signified his willingness to return and serve an unexpired term in the Kansas penitentiary, was taken to the state prison yesterday by John Higgins, parole officer. Before leaving the police station in Kansas City, Kas., Pogue took off his coat and gave it to Louis Robinson, a fellow prisoner, saying he would not need it in prison.

The story of escape from the state prison and his successful efforts to save the mortgaged home of his sister, followed by his voluntary return after accomplishing his purpose aroused interest in the Pogue case. He was convicted in Leavenworth county in 1903, on a charge of of grand larceny and sentenced to seven years in the state prison. In 1906 he disappeared and since that time the authorities have been looking for him.

In speaking yesterday of his adventures, Pogue said he had missed thirty-five days work since he left the prison and that practically all of the money earned during this time had been sent to his sister in Leavenworth.

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December 21, 1909

DENTIST'S BLOWPIPE
EXPLODES; BURNS TWO.

SPREADS BURNING GASOLINE
AND FIRES CLOTHING.

Mrs. Wilhelmina Kimberling, Den-
tist Newton's Assistant, in
Critical Condition -- Heavy
Rug Probably Saved Life.

Presence of mind displayed by Mrs. Wilhelmina Kimberling probably saved her life late yesterday afternoon, when a gasoline blow-pipe exploded in the office of Dr. Frank H. Newton, a dentist at 520 Minnesota avenue, Kansas City, Kas., throwing burning gasoline over her clothing and that of Dr. Newton. She ran screaming for aid from the little work room, where the explosion occurred, to the outer office, where she laid down on the heavy floor rug and folded it about her in an effort to check the flames.

Dr. Newton, whose clothing was also afire, raised a window and shouted for help, in the meantime smothering the fire in his clothes. Leslie Channel, a young man who lives in Quindaro, Kas., and his father Samuel Channel, heard the cries and ran upstairs. Mrs. Kimberling's clothing was still burning when they reached her, and Leslie Channel threw his overcoat about her. Dr. Newton, who sleeps in apartments adjoining his offices, carried a heavy comfort from his bed and folded it about her. The folds of the overcoat and comfort smothered the flames, but not until she had been seriously burned.

WOMAN'S CONDITION CRITICAL.

Drs. J. A. Fulton, W. H. McLeod, E. R. Tenney and J. S. Kline reached the scene of the accident soon afterward. The woman was given emergency treatment, and taken to Bethany hospital where it was said last night her condition was critical. She received severe burns on the arms, chest and legs. Her face was also burned, but the attending physicians said the burns there were superficial.

Both of Dr. Newton's hands were burned, and he also suffered a severe burn on the left leg. He was attended by Dr. Kline.

Mrs. Kimberling for several months has worked in the doctor's office. Her mother lives in Illinois. She has one daughter, Hazel, 5 years old, who lives with friends in Kansas City, Mo. Mrs. Kimberling is 23 years old and lived in apartments in the same building in which the accident occurred.

The gasoline blowpipe, which caused the accident, is used by dentists to melt the gold used in fillings and crowns. Dr. Newton said last night he did not know what caused the explosion, but supposed it was due to a defective connection. The dentist's blowpipe is similar to that used by plumbers for melting solder.

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December 21, 1909

BURGLAR LEAVES HIS PICTURE.

Found in Band of Hat Dropped in
Escaping From Residence.

A picture of a burglar was found in the band of a hat he dropped in escaping when Mrs. Houser, 3820 Central street, met two men coming up stairs, after they had ransacked all the rooms on the ground floor, getting considerable valuable jewelry. The robbers had entered the back door by using a skeleton key.

Seeing Mrs. Houser, they escaped through a window and ran down the street. A grocery wagon driver saw them and took up the chase, being joined by a number of passersby. After a run of several blocks the robbers darted down an alley near Twenty-seventh street and Bellview avenue, and made their escape.

A portion of the jewelry was dropped by the thieves in their run. One of them in escaping dropped his hat which contained a small picture. Mrs. Houser identified it as one of the burglars. The police have been unable to find either man yet.

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December 21, 1909

GAMBLED HIS MONEY AWAY.

Cecil Killey, 10 Years Old, Spent It
at Drug Store Raffles.

Money given him by his grandmother to buy schoolbooks Cecil Killey, age 10 years, of 4016 Central avenue, spent on drug store raffles. The boy was taken into juvenile court yesterday to explain.

"All the boys do it," explained the youngster. "Sometimes there are as many as thirty in a drug store at one time. It costs ten cents a chance. If you win you get a box of candy."

"You are too young to gamble this way," said Judge E. E. Porterfield. "The next time you are brought into this court you will be sent to the McCune Farm.

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December 21, 1909

ZOO AT LAST HAS OCCUPANTS.

Gus Pearson's Four Lions Transferred
to Swope Park Yesterday.

The four lions that are to form the nucleus for Kansas City's zoo at Swope park were yesterday transferred to the building from the barn they have been kept in at Dodson. Two buffalo, male and female, presented to the park board by A. Weber, arrived from Kansas last night. They will be exhibited for a few days at the store by Mr. Weber on Walnut street, after which they will be sent to the zoo buildings. C. W. Armour has presented several deer and the Elks several elks, but before they can be shipped from the West to Kansas City a permit will have to be secured from the state game warden.

"After we get all the animals and birds together we will have a pretty fair collection," said Gus Pearson, city comptroller and father of the zoo, last night. "Beside the lions and the buffalo, we have three monkeys, a badger, a wildcat and several smaller birds and animals."

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December 20, 1909

SISTER'S HOME SAVED
BY ESCAPED CONVICT.

THAT TASK ACCOMPLISHED, HE
GIVES HIMSELF UP.

James G. Pogue, Who Says He Left
Lansing Prison in 1906, Tells
How He Lifted the
Mortgage.

Because he could not bear to have his only sister lose her home which had been morgaged to assist in his defense, James G. Pogue in 1906 escaped from the Kansas state prison at Lansing for the purpose of working and saving his money in an effort to lift the mortgage. Having accomplished his purpose, and realizing that he would never be able to make a home for himself or live in peace with the grim threat of recapture constantly before him, Pogue yesterday morning declared his identity to two Kansas City, Kas., policemen, and expressed his desire to return to prison and suffer whatever penalty might be exacted by the law.

NEVER MISSED A REMITTANCE.

During the three years and more of his precarious freedom, Pogue has wandered over almost the whole of the United States. A coal miner, and accustomed to the hardest kind of labor, he worked unceasingly with one object in view of saving the home for his widowed sister. From the harvest fields in South Dakota to bridge building in Arkansas, the hunted man has traveled, but will all his hardships and the difficulty encountered in securing work he has never failed to send his remittance to his sister, Mrs. Ada Tieufel, Fourth street and Marion avenue, Leavenworth. In all, the erring brother has contributed something in excess of $950.

Pogue was convicted in the district court at Leavenworth in November, 1903, on a charge of grand larceny and sentenced to seven years in the state's prison. According to h is story, he was made a trusty and effected his escape on January 15, 1906. A diligent search failed to locate him, and in the circulars sent out from the prison since that time will be found the name and description of James G. Pogue.

IN FEAR OF RECOGNITION.

After making his escape Pogue went to Hutchings, S. D., where he worked for Clyde Carpenter, a sheepman. Later he went to Arkansas and was employed as a trackman on the Kansas City Southern railroad. He had assumed the name of Mike O'Brien, and in his travels about the country went by that name. Returning from Arkansas, he again went to Dakota and worked for a farmer by the name of Jerry Files, near Spencer, S. D.

Three months ago he went to Pine Bluff, Ark., and was employed as pump tender by the Missouri Valley Bridge Company. While working there he recognized among his fellow laborers a man who had known him years ago in Leavenworth. the haunting fear which had followed him at all times after his escape from prison prompted him to quit his job at Pine Bluff because he feared that his old associate would recognize him. The determination to give himself up came as a result of frequent discussions with his sister on the subject.

ANXIOUS TO FINISH TERM.

He knew his desire to take a claim and prove up on it could not be realized with safety so long as he was an escaped convict. Saturday morning he arrived in Kansas City and determined to make himself known. In former years he had lived at 225 North James street, Kansas City, Kas., and the thought came to him that he would deliver himself up to Kansas officers. Early yesterday morning he disclosed his identity to Robert Hooper and Pres Younger, Kansas City, Kas., policemen. He was taken to No. 2. police station and locked up while the prison authorities at Lansing were notified. He probably will be taken this morning to the prison where he will be compelled to serve the remainder of his term.

"I am anxious to make a man of myself," said Pogue last night, as he looked through the bars of his cell at the police station. "I kind of wanted to stay free until after Christmas time, but it would only be putting it off, and the sooner I begin serving my time the sooner I will be able to walk about the streets without hiding my face every time a man passes.

TO MAKE A MAN OF HIMSELF.

"I am glad I got away and helped my sister to save her home, even if I do have to suffer additional time for it. You see I would have been out by this time if I had stayed and now I will have to stay three years or more. I used to drink quite a bit before I went wrong, and I lay most of my trouble to that, but since I went into the prison in December, 1903, I have never taken a drink of liquor.

"I want to serve my time and then take out a claim somewhere and make a man of myself. You see I am only 32 years old now, and that ain't too old for a man to begin to live as he ought, do you think so?"

Pogue's manner and conversation left the impression of sincerity, and his face sh owed signs of pleasure as he talked of his future prospects.

J. K. Codding, warden at the Kansas state prison said last night that his records at the prison showed Pogue to have broken his parole, and John Higgins, parole officer of the institution, probably will go to Kansas City, Kas., this morning to return with the prisoner.

Pogue's wife and 10-year-old daughter are now living in Leavenworth. His father, David Pogue, a retired merchant, he says, is living in Topeka.

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December 20, 1909

WORKHOUSE INMATES
TAUGHT CLEANLINESS.

METHODS FOLLOWED AT INSTI-
TUTION SETS EXAMPLE.

Improvements Make All Cells Sani-
tary -- Shower Baths Provided
and Fumigator to De-
stroy Germs.

The interior of the workhouse has taken on quite a different aspect in the last few days, important improvements having been completed. The ceilings and walls are painted white, the latter having a heavy coat of red about six feet up from the floor. All of the cells have a new coat of shiny black enamel.

Until the recent improvements, each cell was unsanitary, being equipped with nothing but an old bucket. Now every cell is provided with a sanitary plumbing outfit. It took one month to dig a sewer inside the cell block and make the necessary connections. Outside the work could have been done in a week or ten days, but there the dirt had to be carried out in small boxes. The sewer is from five to seven feet deep and before dirt was reached it was necessary to dig through four inches of solid concrete, chisel through a steel plate one-eighth of an inch thick and then pick the way through eighteen inches more of solid concrete. This is laid beneath the floor to prevent any escapes by tunneling. As it took fully three weeks to reach terra firma it is not likely that anyone would succeed in completing a tunnel before being captured.

There also is a new system regarding mattresses and bedding. When a new prisoner arrives he gets a fresh, clean mattress, stuffed with clean straw. When the prisoner leaves the straw is burned and the bed tick washed. The cleaning method continues with regard to blankets. When a prisoner leaves his blanket goes direct to the laundry. If he is a long term man his blanket is washed and he gets a clean one two or three times a month. He also gets a fresh bed tick with new straw frequently.

SHOWER BATHS FOR ALL.

At the east end of the cell block is a new washroom with a dozen bowls. Across the corridor are shower baths. Both have hot and cold water and plenty of soap. A prisoner is required to bathe on entering the workhouse, all of his discarded clothing going to the fumigator. He also is examined by the workhouse physician, Dr. F. H. Berry. His physical condition also is looked after. For the first time since it was built the workhouse now is absolutely free of any kind of vermin, and Superintendent Cornelius Murphy says he intends to keep it that way.

When a prisoner's clothes go to the fumigator they are not afterwards packed away in a bag and given to him all full of wrinkles when he leaves the place. In the workhouse now is a tailor who understands cleaning, pressing and mending. After leaving the fumigator the underclothing and linen go to the laundry where they are washed and ironed. The outer clothing goes to the tailor who repairs, cleans and presses it. When a prisoner leaves the institution now he often finds his "makeup" in far better condition than when he entered.

"The scheme of putting a prisoner's clothing in good condition," said C. A. Beatty, assistant superintendent, "has proven a good one and the men greatly appreciate it. It does not send a poor man away looking like a trap, but he has a good 'front' and is fit to apply to any man for work. The prison clothes worn by the men are washed frequently and the men are required to take baths often. It is new to many but they are getting used to it."

SOME LEARN TRADES.

In the sewing room, established at the personal expense of William Volker, president of the board of pardons and paroles, all of the bed ticks as well as the clothing worn by both men and women prisoners, are made by women prisoners. One young woman who had been a frequent inmate of the institution now is earning $2.25 a day at a local mattress factory. Others are earning an honest living at overall factories. They learned to sew under the instruction of Mrs. Burnett, who has charge of the sewing room. Some never had done any stitching.

Another adjunct to the workhouse, which has proved a success, is the shoemaking department. A practical shoemaker, hired at the expense of Mr. Volker, is instructing the long term men how to be shoe cobblers and some are learning how to make shoes throughout. The shoes of all prisoners are overhauled and mended in this department. The shoeshop and sewing rooms are located over the barn and are heated by steam.

There are thirty-five men now out at the industrial farm at Leeds. They are now engaged at present in making a new roadway, but in the summer they are going to learn practical farming and gardening. This, too, has proven a success.

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December 20, 1909

MUST LIGHT CONVICTS' PIPES.

New Duty Imposed Upon Guards in
the Federal Prison.

TOPEKA, Dec. 19. -- Warden McClaughrey of the federal prison has gone Warden Codding of the state prison one better in the matter of reforms. He has issued an order requiring the guards to light the pipes of the convicts.

A few days ago some convicts almost set one of the prison barns afire in the federal prison. To prevent any accident of that kind Warden McClaughrey simply decided to take matches away from all the prisoners. In order not to disappoint them in their smoking, however, he has directed the guards to carry a small alcohol lamp to light the pipes of the prisoners.

The guards are kicking on the order, claiming it makes them the servants of the convicts, but the order will stand just the same. It is estimated that the prison will save $25 a month on matches by reason of the new order, but it will probably spend double that amount for fuel in the alcohol lamps.

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December 20, 1909

MAYOR LIMPS AFTER ROMP.

Playing With Children, Mr. Critten-
den Injures Big Toe.

While having a romp with his children at his home on Flora avenue Saturday morning, Mayor Crittenden sprained a ligament in the big toe of his right foot.

During the day the mayor went about his official duties, although he suffered a great deal of pain. Yesterday the whole foot became swollen and inflamed, and his physicians ordered him to take absolute rest for a few days. The mayor carries an accident policy.

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December 20, 1909

BUCKET BRIGAGE AT FIRE.

Kansas City, Kas., House Completely
Destroyed -- Fire Hose Frozen.

The home of John Nilges at 1414 Wyoming street, Kansas City, Kas., was completely destroyed by fire yesterday evening. Practically everything in the house was saved. The loss on the building, a two-story frame structure, is estimated at $2,700. The Nilges family were at home when the fire was discovered and the alarm was turned in at once.

When the firemen responded it was found that a part of the hose which had been in use earlier at a packing house fire, was frozen to such an extent as to render it useless. It was necessary to send for additional hose. In the meantime the firemen and neighbors formed a bucket brigade but it was impossible to save the house.

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December 19, 1909

HURRIES FROM GRAVE
TO LAUGH ON STAGE.

GIRL WIFE SINGS SCOTTISH DIT-
TIES, CHOKING SOBS.

As Orchestra Plays "Hearts and
Flowers" for Next Sketch the
"Two Macks" Mourn Death of
"Danny," Their First Born.

Unknown to the audience of the Gayety theater yesterday afternoon, while the orchestra playing the gladsome tunes suggestive of love and happiness, a drama was being enacted in the dressing rooms behind the scenes. In her room sat a wife of one year, her head buried in her arms and tears streaming down her face. Between sobs she could be heard to say: "My baby, my little boy."

Beside this woman sat a young man, barely out of his teens, trying in his way to console the heartbroken girl. Tears glistened in his eyes. His face was contorted with pain and anguish. He was the picture of despair.

The young man was Douglas McKenzie, 20 years old, of Dundee, Scotland. The girl was Mabel McKenzie, 18 years of age, his wife. The two are known to the stage world as the "Two Macks," and they have been playing a comic sketch in Scotch the last week at the Gayety. The two sat in the dressing room in their plaids and kilts, the same that they had appeared in a few minutes before on the stage.

The orchestra suddenly ceased its playing. The lights were turned low. The next sketch was a love scene and the orchestra in a low key softly began, "Hearts and Flowers." The young wife raised her head and listened. With her sleeve she brushed away the tears.

"I wonder if Danny is in heaven -- I know he is," she said, smiling. "I suppose the angels are now playing the same tune."

Danny was the name of their little boy, only a few weeks old, whom they had buried but two hours before. One year ago Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie were married in Scotland. They came to this country on their honeymoon trip and got a place on the vaudeville stage. They made a tour of Texas and Oklahoma. Two months ago they reached Kansas City.

A baby was born, Danny, they called him. There were doctor bills to pay and room rent. Last Thursday the little boy died. They had no money to pay for its burial. for two days the little body was kept in their rooms at the Wyandotte hotel, the undertakers refusing to take it until the burial expenses were advanced.

Yesterday morning Mr. McKenzie told Tom Hodgeman, manager of the Gayety, of his plight. Mr. Hodgeman immediately went to all the playhouses in the city. He told the young man's story to the actors. When he returned from his trip Mr. Hodgeman had $80, enough to pay the funeral expenses.

HURRY TO THEATER.

Yesterday afternoon the little body was buried. From the cemetery where they had laid to rest their first born the young pair hurried to the theater. They arrived barely in time to dress in Scotch costume for their sketch. The "Two Macks" came out on the stage. They danced the Scotch dances and sang the light and frivolous Scotch ditties. They smiled, they laughed and they joked. Little did the audience realize that behind the mask of happiness were two bleeding hearts, a man and wife who had just come from the cemetery after burying their baby boy.

The curtain was rung down and the two went to their rooms. Mrs. McKenzie broke down in tears. During the long minutes she had been on the stage playing the part of a Scotch lassie the minutes had been torture. "Danny" was dead. He was her first born.

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December 19, 1909

COP'S SPEED LIMIT IS WALK.

Threatens to Arrest Autoists, They
Say, If Machine Goes Faster.

Formal protest was made last evening by Mrs. Victor Bell and her son, Dr. Charles Bell, to A. J. Dean, president of the park board, alleging that park policeman No. 14 on Cliff drive was unduly harsh yesterday afternoon in threatening them with arrest if their automobile was driven faster than he could walk on the Cliff drive. Mr. Dean will take up the matter at the next meeting of the park board.

Mrs. Bell and her sons, Dr. Charles Bell and Harold Bell, were halted in their big 60-horse landaulet in about the middle of Cliff drive. They were taking their usual afternoon ride when park policeman No. 14 shouted to them to halt. The chauffeur stopped.

"We were traveling very slowly," said Dr. Bell, who lives at the Hotel Baltimore, last evening, "when the policeman stopped us. At first we were threatened with arrest. Then we were told we might proceed, but that if the policeman ever caught us driving faster than he could walk that he would arrest us without further notice. We objected to this threat because a man's walk is certainly too slow a pace for an automobile. Our driver is familiar with the speed laws. Yesterday the driver took extra precautions because of the ice and snow. This in itself is sufficient for any driver to remain well within the speed limit. I know that we were not running faster than we do in Petticoat Lane.

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December 19, 1909

TRAIN IS RUSHED TO
LEE'S SUMMIT FIRE.

AID FROM KANSAS CITY STOPS
FLAMES IN BUSINESS SECTION.

Town Helpless as Conflagration
Gets Beyond Control, Following
Pump of Volunteer Firemen
Breaking -- Damage $65,000.

Lee's Summit, twenty-five miles southeast of Kansas City, unable to cope with a fire which threatened the business section last night, appealed to Kansas City for aid and a special train, carrying a fire engine and hose reel, went out over the Missouri Pacific at 11:45 o'clock, nearly two hours later.

The fire started from a stove, which was located over the M. A. Kinney grocery store. In a few minutes the entire business section of the town seemed doomed. By midnight three business buildings were badly burned and two others were damaged.

T. M. George, a real estate dealer, was overcome by the heat, but was rescued and revived. No other injuries were reported.

The Lee's Summit fire department was badly handicapped. The company had only a gasoline pump with which to work. Water was pumped from a public well. Two streams of water were being directed on the fire when the pump broke and the volunteers were rendered helpless. The Kansas City's aid was sought.

NINE FIREMEN TAKEN.

A special train was made up of two flat cars and one caboose. The fire engine and reel was from No. 1 station. Nine men were taken along from Company 16 with Assistant Chief Alex Henderson in charge.

The special train reached Lee's Summit at 1 o'clock this morning. when the Kansas Cityans arrived the entire population of Lee's Summit, numbering 2,000, out fighting the fire in their helpless way, cheered wildly. The engine and reel were unloaded at once on skids and in fifteen minutes a big stream was being played on the fire. the water from the old mill pond was used.

The flames were checked rapidly by the Kansas City firemen, and the impending complete destruction of the business district was prevented.

The entire stock and goods of the M. A. Kinney company, in whose building the fire started, were completely destroyed. The flames spread to the building belonging to J. D. Ocker, which was occupied by his stock of furniture and hardware.

BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

The entire building was destroyed, including Mr. Ocker's complete stock of goods, and also the offices and fixtures of Dr. J. C. Hall, who occupied the floor above.

The fire next caught at the Citizens' National bank and the building and all the fixtures and property were consumed except the fire-proof vaults.

The J. P. McKisson building located east of the burned block was saved by the valiant work of the volunteer fire department, under the command of H. Lewis. The volunteers had played their streams on this building until the breaking of the apparatus.

One business block was practically saved. In this was the W. B. Howard Clothing store occupying the ground floor and the Bell telephone company on the floor above.

The loss of the Bell telephone company exceeds $3,000 although the local office was but slightly damaged. Only a week ago the company had rewired the town.

All connections and cables were burned and the service completely destroyed. W. B. Howard, cashier of the Citizens State bank declared that his business was the only one affected entirely covered by insurance.

CITY RECORDS LOST.

In the Citizen's Bank building, where the Kansas City firemen finally checked the fire, were located the offices of Keupp & Kimball, a real estate firm, and also the rooms of the city council. All the records and papers of the city were stored in the city rooms, and were a complete loss.

The Kansas City firemen directed two streams of hose on this building and within twenty minutes had the fire put out. There was plenty of pressure and 1,200 feet of hose were used.

The loss will aggregate $65,000. The damage to the buildings was estimated at $15,000, while conservative estimates place the damage to the goods at $50,000. M. A. Kinney carried $1,000 insurance on both his stock and his building.

J. R. Leinweber, president of the bank at Lee's Summit, announced immediately after the fire that plans would be taken for an early re-building of the bank building. The bank is capitalized at $26,000 and has a surplus of $15,000. Its deposits at the last quarterly statement were $108,00. All the valuable papers and bonds held by the bank were deposited in the fire-proof safety vaults, which were uninjured by the fire.

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December 20, 1909

ARREST A SACK OF SNAKES.

Police Also Take "Grave Robber"
and "Wild Man."

Detectives who do not object to tackling bad men draw the line when it comes to taking snakes into custody. There was a case of near insubordination in the detective bureau last night. It came about owing to the arrest of the proprietors of an animal show which held forth at 525 Bluff street.

The animals consisted of a choice selection of snakes, one fine specimen of Gilamonster and a weird and non-descript sort of animal which was advertised on the handbills as the "South American Grave Robber." There was also a "wild man of Borneo," but he was roped in, tusks, nose rings and all and deposited in the holdover at police headquarters. The detectives were willing to go up against the "grave robber" and even tackle the Gila monster, but they drew the line at a gunny sack full of lively reptiles.

S. H. Terry, S. D. Rose, L. Crossman and C. H. Hornsen, the alleged proprietors were taken to police headquarters and booked for investigation. The arrest was made on complaint of a man who declared that he had been defrauded of $30 while in the show room. The stock alive and kicking was left at 525 Bluff street.

"Suppose the animals should escape," said the inspector of detectives. "You men had better go back and bring them down here." With one accord the officers declared that they had no experience in animal training. The matter was finally compromised by letting one of the proprietors out on bond to care for the sackful of snakes.

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December 18, 1909

DOG MIND-READER IS
FOOTBALL ENTHUSIAST.

REMEMBERS SCORE OF THANKS-
GIVING GAME HERE.

Master Lives on the Money Earned
by Pet He Bought for Price of
a Drink Eighteen Years
Ago in Paris.

Pilu is a ragged little black-and-white dog, an Irish terrier, blind in one eye and deaf in one ear. He is eighteen years old. He was purchased from a drunken Englishman in Paris for a drink of whisky. Sig. D. Ancilotti bought him at this low price when Pilu was a clumsy little puppy and little did the purchaser know then that he was making his whole fortune out of his kindly impulse to take a fluffy, whining cur from a drunkard. But he was.

Pilu today earns more money than a dozen laborers working ten hours a day could earn. Pilu is the only mind-reading dog in the world and the large audiences that are frequenting the Orpheum this week are being boggled by the truly marvelous feats performed by the canine. The act is an absolute novelty to vaudeville and is so entertaining that the animal and its master are invariably fatigued ere they finish answering the repeated encores.

Pilu performs his tricks with the aid of a low, horizontal bar on which are hung a series of cards numbered from one to ten. A fence of green cord is strung around the poles and inside this fence, up and down the length of the pole, the dog mind-reader walks stiffly and tells you what you are thinking about.

Pilu is very fat and has a stub of a tail which wiggles as he walks. Now and then he looks at Ancilotti and smiles, slipping out a great length of pink tongue with a knowing leer.

THINGS PILU DOES.

Pilu tells how many babies there are in the family of the police headquarters man and he gives the ages of several persons in the audience.

Last night this wonderful dog attempted a new one when some football fan asked Ancilotti if his pet could remember the final score of the Missouri-Kansas football game.

"Certainly," responded the master. "Pilu, what was the score of the Missouri-Kansas football game?"

Pilu cocked his head over to one side and ran out a length or two of the pink tongue, batted his blind eye and marched twice up and down the length of the pole. Then he put up his fuzzy paw and knocked down the cards thus, 1-2-6. And that, it pleasant to recollect for the Tiger, was the score of that memorable conflict on the local gridior last Thanksgiving.

M. Ancilotti protested that he had not known the score and to show his good faith, went off the stage with a number written by a spsectator and shouted over the scene:

"Allons, Pilu. Allons."

"Allons," in French, spoken to a wooly old mongrel, means, "get on your job." And, Pilu got on the job by knocking down the figures 2, 5 and 8 -- 258, which was the number that had been written by the auditor.

Of course everybody watches Ancilotti closely in the hopes of catching him giving the dog signals, but no one has yet announced a solution of the mystery as to how the animal knows what to do so unerringly.

"My dog never makes a meestake," he shouted toward the close of his act. "To show you, here is a newspaper. Now, Pilu, how many letters are there in the name of this paper?" Pilu promptly knocked down a 2 and a 0, meaning twenty. Once more the mindreading wonder was correct, for Ancilotti held a copy of The Kansas City Journal, in which title there are twenty letters.

PILU WELL LOVED.

When the show was over Pilu trotted down to his dressing room to Mme Ancilotti to be kissed and patted. He was well hugged. He ought to be. For years he has been earning the living of all three of the Ancilottis.

Sig. Ancilotti says that it required ten years of hard, persistent training to teach Pilu the science of mind-reading, but he would not intimate his method of training. He insists that the dog possesses not a dog mind, nor a human mind, but a superhuman mind and that he has no set of signals by which he aids the animal in its tests. The king of Italy shares Ancilotti's opinion as to the superhuman qualities of the dog's mind, for he has presented the shaggy little fellow with a handsome gold watch, believing that he could and should know the time of day.

Pilu will tour America until July and then will be taken to London, where he will make his farewell appearance on the stage. Old age forces an early retirement and Ancilotti already has his eyes cast wistfully on another dog with which he hopes to continue his harvest of gold.

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December 18, 1909

BOIL WATER, OR
JUST TAKE IT RAW?

DEPENDS ON HOW YOU LIKE
GERMS, SAYS CROSS.

City Chemist Says Water Supply
Shows Improvement and That
Bacteria Are Not of
Dangerous Sort.

"Would you still advise consumers of Missouri river water, as it comes through the city mains, to boil it?" Dr. W. M. Cross, city chemist, was asked yesterday.

"It all depends upon whether the consumers want to take the germs raw or cooked," laughingly answered the doctor. "So far as I am concerned I take the water straight from the faucet. I do not experience any harm from it, but fastidious people and those whose health is none the best may prefer to have the water boiled. Just now the city is supplying a pretty fair brand of water. The discoloration and presence of sediment so apparent a week ago has almost entirely disappeared, and I believe for the rest of the winter there will be no more off-color water."

BACTERIA NOT HARMFUL.

"How about the bacteria?"

"The centimeter count varies. Some days it is higher than others both at the receiving basins and at different points throughout the city. But people should take no unnecessary fright, for I do not imagine that there is very much to be feared from the character of bacteria we detect by the analysis."

FILTER PLANT NEEDED.

The doctor added that he had but little hope that the water will be entire pure from bacteria and discoloration until the city gets the money to install filtering basins. This is an expense that will have to be provided through a bond issue. A car load of sulphate of iron has been received with which to coagulate the water, and separate it from the solids. The sulphate of iron will succeed alum and lime, and Dr. Cross looks for better results from its use.

Practical demonstration has proven that the burning of oil in the boilers at Turkey Creek station is more economical that coal as a fuel. The fire and water board is advertising for bids for the installation of oil burners and four additional boilers at this station.

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December 18, 1909

VANDERBILT COMING BACK.

The Millionaire Didn't Get a Chance
to Note City's Growth.

Cornelius Vanderbilt, whose friendship for George J. Gould, together with the latter's need for additional capital in the Missouri Pacific secured for him a place in the directorate of that road, was in Kansas City again for a few minutes yesterday morning, stopping for an inspection of the new Missouri Pacific freight house at Union avenue and Liberty street, while engines were being changed on the special train.

The new Missouri Pacific director, while not at all a talkative man, expressed disappointment at not being able to take a trip over the city and view the growth of it since his last visit here, about eight years ago.

"I am coming back to see your city in the spring," said Mr. Vanderbilt, "and I may invest in your new terminal bonds."

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December 18, 1909

CLOWN BAND AND
ORGAN FOR CHILDREN.

LOTS OF MUSIC AND FUN AT
MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS TREE.

A. Judah, Manager of the Grand,
Has a Surprise in Store and It
May Be City's Poor Good Boys
and Girls Will See Theater.

A mammoth organ is to be installed in Convention hall to furnish music for the thousands of little children who will be given presents from the mayor's Christmas tree. The Clown band of the Eagles also will furnish instrumental cheer. The musicians will be dressed in grotesque costumes. A. Judah, manager of the Grand, also has a surprise in the amusement line in store for the tots, and he might repeat this year his generosity of last year by inviting the children who seldom see the inside of a place of amusement to his theater for a performance and a liberal candy distribution.

"I'm always the happiest when I am doing something for girls and boys that the sun of plenty does not shine upon," said Mr. Judah at yesterday's meeting of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association. Then he chipped in $25 to the fund, which has now reached the encouraging sum of $3,124.10.

"We'll double that amount when we hear from the people we have asked subscriptions from," declared A. E. Hutchings, who, with other warm-hearted and self-sacrificing men and women, are giving their time and means to provide Christmas cheer and joy for the thousands of poor children in Kansas City. And these faithful workers are going right ahead with their commendable work, regardless of envious and malicious ones who belittle the association by referring to it as the "Public Tree."

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December 18, 1909

DIDN'T DANCE FAST ENOUGH.

So Man With Revolver Shot Robert
Kimme Through Ankle.

According to a statement made by Robert Kimme, of 912 Bellefontaine avenue, as he lay on the operating table of the emergency hospital last night with his right foot shattered from a revolver bullet, there is an armed maniac roaming the down town district of Kansas City.

Kimme was found lying in an alley near Eighth and McGee streets by Patrolman J. Keenan. He declared that he was taking a short cut downtown from his home when a man armed with a revolver walked up to him and commanded him to dance. Kimme attempted to do so, but his efforts failed to please his captor, who shot him through the right ankle.

After receiving emergency treatment Kimme was taken to the general hospital.

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December 17, 1909

YOUNG HANSEN TO BOONVILLE.

Master and Faithful Dog May Be
Separated Indefinitely.

"Lawrence Hansen, I am afraid, will have to go to Boonville."

Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer, made this statement yesterday when asked what would be done with the Kansas City, Kas., youngster who ran away from his home Monday night with $5 of his mother's money.

"We had him once at the McCune farm, but he ran away. The only place for him, now that he has violated his parole, is the reform school."

"Will he be given back his dog, Jack?" was asked.

The doctor laughed.

"I want to tell you I have been in hot water all day. There was a woman down here at 7:30 o'clock this morning demanding that I give the boy his dog. Several persons stopped me on the street to inquire what I intended to do."

But Dr. Mathias would not say whether he would reunite dog and master. If Lawrence is sent to the reform school by the juvenile court, it will be impossible to keep the two together. Lawrence will be kept locked up at the Detention home until Monday, when Judge E. E. Porterfield will decide his fate.

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December 17, 1909

COURTESY SHOWN OLD AGE.

Santa Fe Has Sleeper Opened for
Old Couple's Comfort.

So that J. Bottomly, 90 years old, and his wife, 85 years old, would not have to wait about the Union depot, a sleeping car on which they had berths to California, over the Santa Fe railroad, was backed into the train shed and they were assisted to it an hour before the usual time last evening.

The couple are to spend their last days in Southern California. They have lived in Minneapolis, but recently doctors told their relatives that if the old folks desired to prolong their lives they would have to remove to a balmier climate. They arrived from Minneapolis via the Burlington road about 5 p. m. They were assisted into the depot, but the noise and drafts annoyed them.

Their train was not due to depart until 9:25 p. m., but attaches of the Santa Fe railroad thought of the special sleeper which is attached to the train here and had it backed into the train shed around 8 o'clock. The old couple were transferred to it.

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December 17, 1909

CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
CITY'S POOR HORSES.

NEGLECTED COBS AND FALLEN
THOROUGHBREDS INVITED.

Humane Society to Be Host at Con-
vention Hall Where Equine
Event Will Show Sufferings
to Local Philanthropists.

The poor horses of the city will be fed to satiety at least once this year. By arrangement with the directors of Convention hall yesterday, the Humane Society, in conjunction with Mrs. Emma W. Robinson, 3208 East Tenth street, and Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook, 3229 East Eleventh street, will give a feast of oats, bran and ground corn, with trimmings of real hay, to the neglected cobs and fallen thoroughbreds of all sections in the big Auditorium Christmas day.

"It will not be an equine quality event," Mrs. Hornbrook said yesterday, "but it will be on invitations, anyway. This is to prevent spongers from feeding a team at our expense. The money will be raised by subscription. We are asking the wholesale houses to donate enough feed for several hundred animals."

The invitations are being printed today. They read:

"Christmas dinner for the workhorse,
Given by the Humane Society,
Call at Convention hall Christmas day between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m .

The plan of giving one good meal to the horses is original with Mrs. Robinson. She always has been interested in the dumb animals, and is a member of long standing of the Humane Society. She said last night:

"Someone has got to take up the horse's end of this charity proposition. It is not right that people should go on year after year giving alms to the human derelicts and entirely ignoring man's best friend, his horse. The scheme to give old work horses at least one square meal has been carried out to perfection in Norway, and someone should try it here. I suppose it will be scoffed at by some, but that is because it is new. In a few years, when through such humble means the attention of the world is directed toward the old horse and his suffering, it will be looked upon in a different light."

Edwin R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society, is in favor of the "banquet."

"Not for itself," he said yesterday, "but merely as a means to bring the suffering of our four-footed friends before local philanthropists. The Chicago idea of tagging the horses that are misused or underfed is not a poor one, but this one will get emaciated subjects of charity together by the hundred, in one hall, and let people see them."

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December 17, 1909

MILLION IS RAISED
FOR ORIENT SYSTEM.

Result of Recent Trip of
Officials and Capitalists.

The sum of $939,000 in subscriptions for the promotion of the work on the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient Railway is the result of the recent trip conducted by President A. E. Stilwell and Edward C. Dickinson, vice president of the railroad company. The trip was taken the first of this month, lasted fifteen days, ending the first of this week. Mr. Dickinson was accompanied by a party of Eastern business men and capitalists. He pronounces the trip a success from a business standpoint as well as in every other way. Before the trip was completed $789,000 had been subscribed by the men of the party and since then the other $150,000 has been sent in.

The trip started at Chicago, the party being taken in a special train. Th intention was to go straight to El Paso and down to the City of Mexico directly from there. However, storms, washouts and swollen streams made that particular rout out of the question. So the party had to give up the idea of going over that section of the company's tracks. The trip South was therefore by way of Chillicothe, Fort Worth, San Antonio and Laredo to Mexico City. The latter part of the trip was made over the Orient lines.

The return trip took the party over the Mexican Central to El Paso, over the Texas Pacific to Sweet Water and on into San Angelo. The Kansas City, Mexico & Orient line was then followed as far as Altus where the Frisco was traveled to St. Louis. At the last mention place the party disbanded. Mr. Dickinson returned directly to Kansas City, disappointed in only one thing -- the party had not been able to travel over as much of the company's tracks as had been desired.

The work on the road is to be pushed as fast as possible and all of the improvements contemplated will be made in both roadbed and rolling stock.

When asked in regard to the personnel of the party Mr. Dickinson said he preferred not to give out the names yet because of reasons which also he didn't care to make public. However, he said that John F. Wallace, former chief engineer of the Illinois Central railroad and chief engineer of the Panama canal, who is also a vice president of the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient railway, was one of the party. Mr. Wallace, said Mr. Dickinson, has only recently been made vice president of the road to fill the place of George Crocker, recently deceased. Further that the above Mr. Dickinson said he could say nothing for publication.

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December 17, 1909

AEROPLANE STRIKES FENCE.

C. K. Hamilton Injured at St. Joe,
Will Come Here Today.

ST. JOSEPH, MO., Dec. 16. -- Charles K. Hamilton made a flight of a mile and a half in the Glenn Curtiss aeroplane at 5 o'clock this afternoon against a thirty-five mile wind and, coming back to his quarters at Lake Contrary, reached a speed of sixty-five miles an hour. He was unable to bring the aeroplane down at the usual place of lighting because of the great speed and the velocity of wind, and he was forced against a high board fence and suffered painful injuries to both legs and his body. The aeroplane was damaged only slightly. He previously made three successful flights of three-quarters of a mile each over Lake Contrary, the time in each case being four minutes for the trip. Hamilton will be able to go to Kansas City tomorrow, where he expects to make more flights.

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December 16, 1909

HUGHES ADMITS TWO WIVES,
BUT PLEADS NOT GUILTY.

Arraigned Before Justice Remley,
and Trial on charge of Bigamy
Set for January 11.

Benjamin Franklin Hughes, admitted bigamist and real estate agent, was arraigned yesterday morning in Justice Theodore Remley's court on the charge of bigamy. He pleaded not guilty, and was released on $1,000 bond. His trial was set for January 1.

In a statement made to Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, Mr. Hughes admitted that he had two wives living.

"I confess I have two wives," said Mr. Hughes. "The first one I married in Osborne, Mo. Rev. James E. Hughes, my uncle, a pastor in the Baptist church, married us. I have never been divorced from this wife.

"Seven days ago, December 7, I married Miss Valerie Wiler of Kansas City. Judge Prather of the Wyandotte, Kas., probate court married us."

Why did Mr. Hughes marry Miss Wiler and expect to escape prosecution? This question cannot be answered by the prosecuting attorney's office. It is said that he was advised not to, before it was known that he had a wife living. Mrs. Clay, matron of the industrial school for girls at Chillicothe, is quoted as saying she advised him not to, and so did other persons connected with the case. When Mrs. Clay brought the girl here from Chillicothe December 3, to meet Hughes and plan the marriage, the girl was kept at the detention home. It was after an investigation of the case that the advice against marrying was given.

The report was brought to Mrs. Clay that Miss Wiler was in love with another man. Hughes was told that if he married her that she would probably leave him soon and marry the young man who kept company with her, after she and Hughes became acquainted.

Hughes, so it appears from the statement made by Miss Wiler, had a second affinity after he became enamored with her. He rented a flat at 807 Troost avenue, early in August, and he and Miss Wiler lived there together three days and two nights. It was at this juncture Mrs. Cora Westover, the girl's mother, heard of her daughter's wrongdoing and had her sent to the industrial school in Chillicothe.

"After I was taken away," says Miss Wiler in her statement to the prosecuting attorney, "Mr. Hughes got another woman to live with him. They occupied the flat together for some days following."

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December 16, 1909

PROSPERS DESPITE HOODOO.

Speakers at Phantom Club Banquet
Show Steady Growth.

Members of the Phantom Club, organized on Friday, the thirteenth of December, four years ago, gave its second annual banquet last night at the Hotel Baltimore. Mayor Crittenden and prominent men about town were the guests of honor. Festus O. Miller was the toastmaster.

After a vocal solo by Lewis H. Scurlock, A. M. Kathrens, the president, reviewed the history of the club. He spoke of its organization and of its steady growth. It now has its own quarters at 1032 Penn street.

Other sentiments were responded to as follows:

"Phantoms in the Future," K. G. Rennic; "Club Fellowship," James West French; "Club Benefits," Estell Scott; "Good of the Order," Samuel Eppstein; "Topics," Clyde Taylor; "Remarks," Thomas R. Marks; "Narratives," Judge Harry G. Kyle.

Mayor Crittenden also spoke.

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December 16, 1909

AGAIN HURT GOING TO FIRE.

For Second Time Assistant Chief Is
Thrown From Buggy.

In his second similar accident this month M. M. Mahoney, assistant fire chief at No. 22 station yesterday afternoon while making a run to a fire at 3427 Chestnut street collided with a grocery wagon and was thrown out of his buggy to the pavement, receiving a slight injury on the shoulder and scratches on his face. The ambulance from No. 4 police station went to the scene of the accident, but Mahoney had returned to the fire station.

On December 1 his buggy collided with a motor car while making a run and he was thrown to the ground, but was only slightly injured and went on to the fire.

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December 16, 1909

"DON'TS" FOR YOUNG DENTISTS.

Dr. Campbell, at Banquet, Gives Ad-
vice to Students.

Dr. Dayton Dunbar Campbell of the faculty of the Kansas City Dental college was the guest of honor last night at a banquet at the Hotel Baltimore given by the members of the Delta Sigma Delta fraternity of the college, and as a fitting climax to the event Dr. Campbell gave a little talk on "Dental Don'ts."

Here are some of Dr. Campbell's "dont's" -- "Don't brag about your practice or the size of your fees. Don't gossip with your patients. Don't do any quack advertising. Don't encourage familiarity on the part of your women patients. Don't knock your brother practitioners. Don't talk shop at social gatherings. Don't be untidy."

The banquet was tendered by Dr. Campbell as a token of the esteem in which he is held by the fraternity members. Covers were laid for eighteen.

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December 16, 1909

AN ORPHEUM ACTOR INJURED.

Fred Lindsay, Australian Bushman,
Suffers Cut on Right Hand.

Just as his act at the Orpheum was closing last night, Fred Lindsay, the Australian bushman, who does an interesting whip-cracking act, met with an accident which resulted in a long cut on the back of his right hand, the one he used in the act.

The accident was caused by his whip catching on some scenery and being deflected back. Lindsay's hand was immediately treated by a physician who was unable to state whether the accident would interfere with his work or not.

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December 16, 1909

DOCTORS BUY SITE FOR HOME.

Jackson County Medical Society to
Build on Thirty-First.

The Jackson County Medical Society has purchased a lot at Thirty-first street and Gillham road, and some time after January 1 definite plans will be adopted for the erection of a building, which is to be the ethical home of the physicians of Jackson county. the structure will be used as a meeting place, and will be equipped with a large medical library and a museum. It is the intention to raise the necessary funds for the enterprise by subscription.

About 320 Kansas City doctors are members of the society, and they are working as a body to secure headquarters that will be a credit to the profession and to Kansas City as well.

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December 15, 1909

ONE WIFE AT HOME,
ANOTHER AT HOTEL?

WED NO. 1 27 YEARS AGO; NO. 2
DEC. 7, 1909, THE CHARGE.

Prosecutor and Police Say Benjamin
Franklin Hughes, Held for In-
vestigation, Admits It --
Wife No. 2's Story.
Benjamin F. Hughes, Alleged Bigamist.
BENJAMIN F. HUGHES.
(From a sketch at police headquarters last night.)

That he married one woman, with whom he makes his home, twenty-seven years ago, and another, who, until Sunday lived as his wife at the Hotel Kupper, on December 7, 1909, is said by Captain Walter Whitsett of the police department and Norman Woodson, an assistant prosecuting attorney, to have been admitted by Benjamin Franklin Hughes, 124 North Hardesty avenue, in a statement secured from him in the matron's room at police headquarters last night.

Hughes was arrested yesterday on complaint of Valerie W. Wiler, who lives with her mother, Mrs. Cora Westover, and her sister, Clarice Wiler, at 1622 Madison street. To Lieutenant Robert Smith at police headquarters Miss Wiler represented that she had been married to Hughes, who has a wife and family at the Hardesty avenue address, by Probate Judge Van B. Prather in Kansas City, Kas. The ceremony, she said, was performed Tuesday, December 7.

Miss Wiler was under the impression that Hughes had left the city when she notified the police. It was later determined that he was home with Mrs. Hughes. Officer Oliver A. Linsay made the arrest. The man was held in the matron's room last night and will remain there until an investigation is made of the charges against him at 9 o'clock this morning.

HAS THREE CHILDREN.

Benjamin Hughes is 52 years old, and has lived in Kansas City two years, coming here, Mrs. Hughes said last night, from Glasgow, Mo. He is said to come of an excellent family and has dabbled in politics.

The details of Hughes's statement were not given out last night. It was announced by the prosecutor and Captain Whitsett, however, that he broke down and admitted marrying the Wiler woman in Kansas City, Kas., Tuesday a week ago, giving as his reason that pressure had been brought to bear upon him to unite with the girl.

According to the statement he was married to Mrs. Hughes in Osborn, Mo., April 16, 1882. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. James E. Hughes, pastor of the Baptist church there. Three children, two boys and a girl, were born to them. The oldest son, aged 20, is a clerk in the First National bank. The other son is 16 years old, the girl 11. Few clouds, he declared, darkened his married life until he met the Wiler woman last April. Mrs. Hughes had been congenial, a good, Christian woman whom all respected.

STORY OF NO. 2.

Valerie Wiler last night said she had first met Hughes when she was in the inmate of a home ofr girls at Chillicothe, Mo., under the care of Mrs. E. Carter. She believed the man was a state officer inspecting such public institutions. he seemed to like her at first sight, and came to see her often. Finally he induced her to become his wife.

Leaving Chillicothe, she stated, they went directly to Kansas City, Kas., where she gave her age as 17 years, while Hughes gave his as 45. She produced a certificate on which both names were signed together with that of Judge Van Prather who officiated at the wedding.

After the marriage, she said, the went to the Hotel Kupper where her supposed husband registered ans Frank Hughes and wife. They stayed at the Kupper several days.

"I discovered my mistake last Sunday morning when I was visiting my mother," said Miss Wiler. "She was aware of the attentions paid me by Mr. Hughes and told me that he had a wife and family on Hardesty avenue. I decided to find out if he had deceived me at once.

"Mother, my sister Clarice and I went to the Hughes home about 6 o'clock Sunday evening. We were allowed to enter unannounced, and found the man whom I had supposed to be my husband there surrounded by his family. He was very much frightened, got up quickly, and asked if he could see me alone for a few minutes. I would not listen. It did not take me very long to tell him that what I had to say was to be to his wife as well as to him.

BEGS NO. 1's FORGIVENESS.

"I said to Mrs. Hughes: 'Madame, I have married this man and have the certificate to prove it. We were married last Tuesday.' Then I threw myself at her feet and begged her forgiveness, telling her it was not my fault, that i knew nothing of any former marriage when I allowed him to lead me into matrimony. She forgave me then and told her husband that he was worse than I was. Later she seemed to take it all back, and when I went again to the ho use with my mother and sister tonight she treated me coldly. She even ordered me out of the house. I guess she is a perfect Christian woman. Anyway I loved her at first sight, and feel deeply sorry for her.

When Hughes was courting me he offered me many inducements to become his wife. He said he had been a member of the legislature and owned property in town and a farm near Cameron, Mo., worth in all about$75,000. He admitted that he had been married once, but added that his wife died eight years ago. 'I never loved her as I love you and we will be a very happy couple if you will have me,' he said once.

MRS. HUGHES DISCONSOLATE.

"Sunday night when we confronted him before his wife in his own home, he asked to speak with me aside. I refused, and he seemed very much annoyed. Finally he managed to get close enough to my ear to whisper, 'If you will make up with me, honey, we will get out of this town and go to Mexico.' I do not remember replying. The way he treated his wife did not suit me, although he was kindness itself to me from the first."

At the Hughes home last night Mrs. Hughes would not be interviewed about her husband. She was nearly distracted over his arrest, she said. Occasionally as she spoke she hesitated, wrung her ands and repeated passages from the Bible.

"This woman he married is a very wicked woman," she cried out once. "She drew my husband way to her through her evil ways. Lord have mercy on them both and me. My poor children."

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December 15, 1909

MUST TAKE PIANO AND GO.

Wife Suing for Divorce Has No Place
for Husband's Brother.

Mrs. Pauline Bovee is to have temporary custody of her two little girls. Judge J. G. Park of the circuit court yesterday awarded the mother the temporary custody of Lorena Bovee, aged 10 years, and Med Bovee, aged 8. The children are not to be taken from the county.

Albert W. Fischer, a brother-in-law, is restrained from going to the woman's home, 2513 Woodland avenue. The court ordered that he remove his clothing and piano immediately.

Mrs. Bovee is allowed $45 a month as temporary alimony and $200 attorney fee. Permanent custody of the children will be decided when the divorce suit brought by Mrs. Bovee against Wayland Bovee is finally settled.

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December 15, 1909

TYPHOID IN SWOPE FAMILY.

Attacks Still Another Member, Miss
Stella Swope.

Miss Stella Swope, another member of the Swope family, has contracted typhoid fever. Sarah Swope, her sister, was taken ill with the malady a few days ago. None of the invalids are in a dangerous condition. Miss Dixon, formerly governess, who came to the home with Margaret Swope, is seriously ill, but in no immediate danger.

Miss Lucy Swope is expected home today from New York, having left Paris upon hearing of the illness of the family, and the death of her brother, Chrisman Swope.

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December 15, 1909

BOY LEAVES HOME
TO JOIN HIS DOG.

LAWRENCE HANSEN, PAROLED,
CAN'T BEAR SEPARATION.

Leaves at Night by Bedroom Win-
dow and Is Found Next Day
Playing in Street With
"Jack."

When Lawrence Hansen, 10 year of age, was released three weeks ago from the Detention home, where he was placed after being arrested for "playing hookey" from school, agreed to give "Jack," his fox terrier, to a neighbor. To get Lawrence away from his former bad associates, of whom one was his pet dog, Mrs. Hansen removed to Kansas City, Kas.

For two weeks following his parole Lawrence was a model boy. He attended school regularly and minded his mother. Then came the relapse. The separation from "Jack" could not be borne. Last Monday night Lawrence packed a few of his belongings, lowered them from his bedroom window, stole downstairs in his stocking feet and took $5 from his mother's dresser.

The juvenile officers in Kansas City, Mo., were warned Tuesday to be on the lookout for the boy, but not until yesterday could trace of him be found, when word came that the boy was at 410 Troost avenue where he had been seen playing with "Jack." Juvenile Officer Holt arrested the boy yesterday afternoon and took him to the Detention home.

With tears in his eyes Lawrence was taken before Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer. "Jack" had been left behind.

"I want my dog," he pleaded with the juvenile officer. "I want Jack."

When told that he could not have "Jack," he cried his eyes red. And he continued to cry for an hour after being locked up in the detention room. Finally, when told that he would never get to see the dog again unless he quit crying, the boy dried his tears and became his amiable self.

"That boy is a proposition," said Dr. Mathias. "When he has his dog he is a good boy, but he will not be separated. I expect that the dog will have to be returned to him."

"Jack" has neither pedigree nor physical attraction. The boy several months ago picked him up on a downtown street and took him home. But for all his attention, three meals a day and a blanket to sleep on, the dog could never take on the polish of society and culture. He is still an unpedigreed mongrel of the gutter, but for all that, the inseparable chum.

Arrested three weeks ago for truancy, Lawrence told the juvenile officers he would not go to school because he couldn't take "Jack." The boy and his dog were locked in the same cell, where they ate the same food and shared the same bed, three days and three nights. They were companions in misery. That disregard of law and the rights of others, engendered into the dog from his own life on the streets, was bred by association into the life of his little companion.

"Who is responsible, the boy or the dog?" is the question that the juvenile officers are asking.

Lawrence will be given a hearing next Monday in the juvenile court.

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December 14, 1909

BOY COASTER IS KILLED.

Collision on Thorp Hill, Kansas City,
Kas., Fatal to Harry Wollen-
berg, 14 Years Old.

The first coasting accident of the season in Kansas City, Kas., occurred lsat night when Harry Wollenberg, the 14-year-old son of Martin E. Wollenberg of 1137 Locust street in that city, was struck and fatally injured by a loaded bob sled on the long steep Thorp street hill. Harry was coasting down Thorp street, north from Central avenue, and is supposed to have been struck by a sled coming down the same street, south from Grandview. He was picked up by some of the coasters and taken to a house nearby.

Dr. H. P. Clark of 1215 Central avenue was called and found that the boy had received severe internal injuries. Emergency treatment was given and the boy taken to Bethany hospital in a police ambulance, where Dr. Clark and Dr. C. M. Stemen performed an operation. All efforts to save the boy's life proved fruitless, however, and he died at 12:10 o'clock this morning. The body was taken to the undertaking rooms of Joseph Butler.

The accident occurred about 9:30 o'clock, but it was nearly two and one-half hours later when the ambulance reached the hospital. The delay was caused by the icy condition of the streets. Dr. Clark and Patrolman Thomas Shay, who were with the ambulance, were forced to hold the rear wheels to prevent the vehicle from skidding and turning over.

At the hospital the boy said he did not know who ran into him, and inquiry at the scene of the accident did not divulge this information. Harry Wollenberg was in the Seventh A Grade at the Prescott school. His father, Martin Wollenberg, is employed in the tank room at the Swift Packing Company's plant. He has four other children.

The street where the boy was injured was covered with coasters last night. The hill on Thorp street affords one the longest and steepest slides in the city.

Immediately after the accident to the Wollenberg boy, Sergeant P. H. Peterson ordered his men to stop all coasting on hills if the coasters would not content themselves with coasting in one direction. Last winter several young people were badly injured in the northern part of the city in a collision between two bob sleds which were going in opposite directions.

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December 14, 1909

SLAYER WAS KILLED
AFTER HE SURRENDERED.

OFFICERS ALSO TESTIFY GAL-
LOWAY WAS DISARMED.

Coroner Could Not Learn Who Fired
Shot That Proved Fatal to
Murderer of Deputy Sheriff.

That Charles T. Galloway, who murdered Deputy Sheriff Charles Lukens of Wyandotte county, Kas., December 8, was shot and killed after he had surrendered and had been placed under arrest a few hours after the commission of his crime, was testified by witnesses at the coroner's inquest held yesterday morning. According to the testimony of several officers who participated in the spectacular attack which led to the killing of the cornered slayer, Galloway was unresisting and disarmed when the fatal bullet was fired into his abdomen.

"Detectives Wilkens, Downs and myself went upstairs to search for Galloway," testified Detective Ralph Truman. "We found him in a closet in the back part of the house. We called to him to give up. He answered with a valley of shots -- I don't know how many -- and we began shooting at him.

"After we fired a good many shots he called out to us and said: 'I'll surrender.' We told him to open the door and come out. He came out and we got him by the arms and led him into an adjoining room. There were then several shots fired, by whom I don't know, but at the last shot Galloway fell. Upon examination we found he had been shot through the body."

"Was Galloway disarmed when shot?" Trueman was asked.

"I believe he was," he replied.

"Was he unresisting at the time he was shot?"

"Yes, he had surrendered," responded the witness.

"What condition was Galloway in when you brought him out of the closet?"

"He was all right, as far as I know."

HIT DETECTIVE'S SLEEVE.

Detective J. W. Wilkens testified that he and Trueman led Galloway from the closet in which he had been hiding, and that he called to the crowd to quit shooting, but it seems that in the excitement of the moment, not all could realize that Galloway had surrendered. Wilkens said when the fugitive came out of the closet he assumed a crouching attitude and that he had his hands up in the air as a mute signal of surrender. Wilkins also said that the bullet which penetrated the sleeve of his own overcoat was the same one which killed the prisoner.

Detective David H. Oldham, in his testimony, said that earlier in the evening Inspector Boyle had been communicated with over the 'phone, and he had advised that a heavy guard be placed around the house in which Galloway had barricaded himself, and no attempt be made to capture the man until morning, when he would probably be in a less dangerous mood.

This course was decided upon, but at about 11 o'clock, some one, Oldham did not know whom, yelled out that he would go up and help get the fugitive, whereupon several officers announced they would take the lead. Within a moment, the witness said a squad of officers were inside the house. They searched the down stairs rooms first, and then proceeded with a rush upstairs and soon afterwards a fusillade of shots was heard.

Many other witnesses were examined, but no one knew who fired the shot which killed Galloway. The coroner's jury returned a verdict to the effect that Galloway met his death as a result of a gunshot wound inflicted by some unknown person.

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December 14, 1909

FAIL TO FIND EVIDENCE
AGAINST THREE YOUTHS.

Robberies or Murder Cannot Be
Traced to Dye, Shay and Clyne, in
Spite of Saloonkeeper's Son's
Identification.

Evidence gathered the past ten days by the prosecuting attorney's office, so it was announced yesterday, completely exonerates Louis Dye, Harry Shay and Ralph Clyne of the suspicion of having murdered M. A. Spangler, killed on the night of November 23 in his saloon at Twentieth and Grand.

Not only this, but the prosecutor's office is convinced that the young men are not guilty of the dozen or more robberies charged against them by the police. The investigation has been practically concluded. Two city detectives and two police officers have worked the past week to gather evidence. Nothing has been found thus far to connect the three boys with the murder.

"Their preliminary will be held before some justice of the peace," said Edward J. Curtin, an assistant prosecuting attorney, "and unless new evidence is found against them the cases will be dismissed."

"The robbery charges, too?"

"Yes, the robbery charges," replied Mr. Curtin. "There have been many persons here to identify the young men as the ones who held them up, not an identification has been positive. In every instance the person has said they thought they were the ones."

The coroner's jury yesterday recommended that Dye be held for further investigation on the murder charge. The verdict was due largely to the testimony of Sam Spangler, the saloonkeeper's son, who was present at the murder.

It is said there is a conflict between the police authorities and the prosecutor's office in the case.

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December 14, 1909

JUDGE PORTERFIELD
RECOMMENDS COW-
HIDE FOR OBSTREP-
EROUS BOYS.

His Father Had Cowhide and
Was Not Afraid to Use It.
Juvenile Court Judge Edward Everett Porterfield
JUDGE PORTERFIELD OF THE JUVENILE COURT.

Judicial notice was taken yesterday for the first time of the cowhide, as an instrument of regeneration for obstreperous boys, when Judge E. E. Porterfiled of the juvenile court paid it the following tribute:

"If I ever amounted to anything, it's because my father kept a cowhide, and he was not afraid to use it."

This remark was occasioned by a mother's statement that she did not like to whip her children. John Morrisy of 815 East Eighth street, had been summoned into court on the complaint of the mother. She said that she could not control him.

"The only fault I have to find with him is that he does not get up in the morning," she said. "And when he drinks beer he swears at me and his grandmother so loud that he attracts the neighbors."

"Why don't you get the cowhide?" asked the judge.

"Oh, I never did believe in whipping my children."

"You make a mistake, madam. If there was ever a boy in this court who needed a cowhiding, it is your son. My suggestion to you is to get a long whip. If John doesn't get up in the morning, don't wait until he gets his clothes on. Pull him out of bed and thrash him on his bare skin. Like lots of other mothers, you have spoiled your boy by being too lenient."

John Morrisy was arrested the first time in December, 1908, and sentenced to the reform school. He was charged with cursing his mother. John agreed to sign the following pledge, on condition that the sentence would be suspended:

"I am going to get a job and I am going to keep it, give mother my money; am going to church, come in early at night; I am not going to drink whisky or beer; I will not swear any."

John broke that pledge last Thursday. He bought some beer in a livery barn. When he came home he abused his mother and cursed her. The boy was charged also with smoking cigarettes. This he admitted.

"Where did you get the papers?" asked the court.

"It's this way," explained the boy. "The merchants ain't allowed to sell or give them away. I went out to a drug store. I bought two packages of Dukes. When I told the man that the tobacco was no good without papers, he said it was against the law to give them to minors. Then he walked back of the prescription case.

"He looked at me, then at a box behind the counter, where he kept the papers. Of course, I got wise right away. I reached my hand in the box and got three packages."

"You won't smoke any more cigarettes," said Judge Porterfield, "if I don't send you to Booneville?"

"If I can't get the papers, I won't."

The question had to be repeated two or three times before the boy understood. He promised not to use tobacco in any form. If he does, Judge Porterfield ordered that he be taken immediately to reform school. John was taken to the boys' hotel. A job will be found for him, and if he lives up to his pledge, will not be ordered to the reform school.

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Decmeber 14, 1909

FAKE MESSENGER ARRESTED.

Two Boys Get Year in Jail After
Delivering Bogus Telegram.

Early yesterday morning a traveling man at the Sexton hotel was awakened by a rap at the door. Answering the summons he opened the door to have a telegram thrust in his hand by a boy in the uniform of the Postal Telegraph Company.

"Prepare for the worst," it read, "an accident has happened to your two sons. Will wire particulars later. -- Dr. Brown."

The traveling man rushed into his clothes and raced in a cab to the Postal office. There he was told that no message had been received from "Dr. Brown."

Harry Norton, 18 years of age, a messenger boy, was arrested on the charge of embezzlement. Alvin Church, the boy who is said to have delivered the telegram, but who is not an employe of the telegraph company, was taken into custody later on the charge of petty larceny.

When arraigned in the criminal court they admitted their offense, and Judge Latshaw gave each one year in jail, the maximum sentence. The boys say they have worked the fake telegram graft in three cities. Norton obtained work at the Postal in order to get telegraph blanks.

Church, they said, would visit the different hotels and take names from the registers. Fake telegrams would be prepared, usually telling that the man's wife or child was seriously ill or dead. The telegrams would be marked "collect."

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December 13, 1909

MUD IN THE SUPPLY
DUE TO LOW WATER.

LITTLE HOPE FOR RELIEF UN-
DER PRESENT CONDITIONS.

River Stage Drops Five Feet -- Slush
Ice Adds to Trouble -- Filter
Plant Badly Needed at
Quindaro Station.

"Good morning. Have you taken your mud bath?" were the greetings received yesterday by W. G. Goodwin, general superintendent of water works, from consumers who had been compelled to take their morning dips in a coating of mud and drink a muddy mixture at their tables and in their coffee.

"Yes," good-naturedly responded Goodwin, "I've been there and I expect to be repeating it so long as the river remains low and the pumps bring forth as much mud as water. The stage of the river at Quindaro station is four or five feet below the level recorded some days ago and the water is running with slush ice and also all kinds and assortments of debris.

"I do not look for clear water until conditions change, and there is some cessation in the consumption. In addition to keeping the pumps busy for days, delivering water at the rate of 39,000,000 gallons for twenty-four hours, to meet the demands, we were called upon to do the neighborly act for Kansas City, Kas., and make up a deficit in its ordinary supply.

"This meant an additional 3,000,000 gallons a day to our burden of production, and as a consequence the water had to be forced into the distributing pipes to the consumer from the river, without having time to have the solids precipitated by the customary treatment of lime and alum.

FILTERING PLANT NEEDED.

"But the condition of the water is no worse than it always has been when the river is low, and after a heavy snow storm. and what is more, I do not believe consumers will ever see much change in times like these unless the city installs a filtering plant."

Mr. Goodwin found it necessary yesterday as a source of protection to the water supply, to shut off the 3,000,000 gallons a day that Kansas City, Kas., has been getting.

"Superintendent Riley, of the Kansas City, Kas., plant told me that they could get along without our assistance, as he has about completed arrangements to have his own plant furnish all the water that is needed," said Mr. Goodwin.

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December 13, 1909

ACTOR AUSTRALIAN BUSHMAN.

Tells of Miraculous Escape While
Fighting Boers in Africa.

Few men have led a more exciting career than Fred Lindsay, Australian bushman, Boer war veteran, big game hunter and expert whip, who is at the Orpheum this week.

Mr. Lindsay also has hunted in Africa. Last fall he gave Mr. Roosevelt pointers on big game hunting, and invited to president to hunt on the Lindsay preserves in Africa.

Mr. Lindsay fought with the British against the Boers. In an engagement on the east coast, according to his own story, he came nearest facing death of the many times in his career,

"My regiment had been ordered up from Beira, a Portuguese town," said he. "This is notorioulsy a death hole, and it proved such for both men and horses. After the relief of Mafeking I went to Rustenberg, getting into action among the hills with about 300 men. We were soon completely surrounded by General Delarey with 1,000 men, and, as the Australians were in a bad position, every horse was shot in less than five minutes.

"My sergeant, two corporals and a private were killed next to me. I escaped miraculously. The spur was shot off my boot. Captain Fitzclarence, of Mafeking fame, rescued us as darkness came.

"The next two days resulted in the hemming in of the whole of the small force of 300 men by Delarey at Elands river, with fourteen field guns and two pompoms, the position taken being that of a small exposed kopje, with a little stream running at the foot.

"For twelve days this gallant little band held out against the whole forces of the Boers, who outnumbered us. At the end of that time we were relieved by General Kitchener with 24,000 men.

"Every drop of water had to be fought for every night at dusk, the carta coming back from the stream with water spurting through bullet holes that the boys plugged up with grass and mud till they reached the summit of the hill.

"Every man worked hard with bayonet, knife and even his finger nails to dig a hole in the stony ground deep enough to afford him shelter from the rain of bullets. the animals were tied in lines and it was no unusual thing for a shell to carry off seven or eight of them at a time. Eventually every one of them was killed.

"A little touch of humor relieved the awful tragedies everywhere about us, and that was when several wagons loaded with cases of champagne, canned soups and other luxuries, presented by Lord Rothschild, got into the danger zone.

"Every time the parcel was hit with a shell it was a good excuse for the boys to jump in and divide it among them, so that many a poor chap whose mouth was swollen for lack of a drop of water got many a good pull at a magnum of sparkling French wine."

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December 13, 1909

STODDARD MEETS STODDARD.

Joplin Drummer and Utica Salesman
Akin in Seventeenth Century.

"Mr. Stoddard, I want you to meet Mr. Stoddard," said Clerk George Mong at the Coates house last evening as he introduced Rock Stoddard of Joplin, Mo., to G. L. Stoddard of Utica, N. Y. The latter had just signed the hotel register, and Rock Stoddard was waiting to pay out.

Both Stoddards are traveling men and it developed that back several centuries their forefathers were related closely. In the seventeenth century three brothers crossed the ocean from England. One settled in New York state, the other in Connecticut and the other in Canada. The descendants of the brother who settled in Connecticut and New York fought in the revolutionary war.

G. L. Stoddard, whose home is in Utica, N. Y., said that the brothers who settled in the States finally drifted together in New York state. Several of the descendants have since gone West and South. He is a descendant of the brother who settled in Connecticut. Rock Stoddard, whose home is at Joplin, is a descendant of the brother who went to Canada.

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December 13, 1909

ORPHANS TO BE AT MATINEE.

Benefactor Ill, Boys Will Depend on
Charity for Christmas.

The boys of the Kansas City Orphans' home will be the guests of Oscar Sachs at the matinee at the Orpheum tomorrow afternoon. The boys will be chaperoned by Mrs. Lee Lyson, Mrs. Ferdinand Heim, Mrs. Oscar Sachs, Mrs. J. W. Wagner, Mrs. S. Harzfeld and Mrs. A. D. Cottingham. Mrs. John C. Tarsney, the benefactor of the home, has been ill for some time and so the boys expect that good people will take an interest in them and remember them on Christmas. About 130 orphans are cared for at the home, which is in the charge of sisters of the order of St. Vincent de Paul.

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December 13, 1909

ANCIENT BEAVER HAT BACK.

After 35-Year Rest It Again Is Lat-
est in Style.

"I saw a number of men's beaver hats flitting around the lobby today, and they reminded me of when I was a little boy," said Vinton Bell, depot master at the Union depot, said yesterday.

"Years ago, I don't care to say how many, they were all the rage, and everybody had one. I recollect having seen cowboys with blue beavers with yellow bands riding into town in great style. Then they went out of fashion, apparently never to return. It was generally conceded that they were too effeminate for the masculine gender of this progressive country, but here they are again, sure enough."

The new men's beaver is in all colors of the rainbow, blue, purple and green predominating. Traveling salesmen and actors have been the most ready purchasers of the new fad so far, but those who have them for sale say one can never tell who will take up with them next.

The men's beaver went out of style about thirty-five years ago. In certain Western districts beaver hats were worn long after the species had become extinct and in cities.

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December 12, 1909

CITY HALL CANARY KILLED.

"Elizabeth," Pet of Water Depart-
ment, Crushed by Door.

"Elizabeth," the canary that had a record of raising a family of eighteen birds since April 15 last, and which always attracted so much attention because it was given its freedom in the city hall offices of Tom Gregory, auditor of the water department, was accidentally killed yesterday. The little warbler was perched on top of a door when a sudden gust of wind closed the door. The bird was caught in the jam of the door case, and its life crushed out. Mr. Gregory and his office force are inconsolable.

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December 12, 1909

NAVY OFFICERS WALK
"THE TEST" IN SNOW.

FIFTY MILES, THREE AN HOUR
IN 3 DAYS, THEIR RECORD.

Sore Feet Only Bad Effect of Feat
Performed by Lieut. Vanderbeck
and Dr. Cather in Compliance
With Roosevelt Order.
Navy Lieutenant C. S. Vanderbeck.
LIEUTENANT C. S. VANDERBECK.

Lieutenant C. S. Vanderbeck and Dr. David C. Cather, of the United States navy, have proven themselves pedestrians who defy the weather man when they elect to accomplish a walking feat. For three days, ending at 2:37 o'clock yesterday afternoon, they battled against the most turbulent elements given Kansas City thus far this winter and they came under the wire with a record of having traveled on foot a distance of fifty miles in three days, or an average of three miles an hour, every step taken being in ice, snow or slush. This is considered splendid headway for a pedestrian, especially as the ordinary walker these wintry days slips back a step or two occasionally.

ROOSEVELT ORDER.

The physical test to which the two navy officers have just subjected themselves was in compliance with an order promulgated by Theodore Roosevelt. The strenuous executive urged several tests, but the one in particular was the walking test, it being decreed that the army and navy officers keep in physical trim by covering a distance of fifty miles in three days as frequently as possible.

Last Thursday the two officers started out. On that day they walked to Independence and back, a distance of 19 1/2 miles, in 5 hours and 57 minutes. Friday 21 miles were covered in 7 hours and 33 minutes, while yesterday the pedestrians went ten miles in 3 hours and 52 minutes.

STEEL CLAMPS WORN.

The actual distance was 50 1/2 miles and the average of three miles per hour was made possible only by the officers wearing steel clamps on their shoes.

A physical examination of the men was made before and after the test and no bad result of his exertion and he says that he was not the least bit fatigued at the end of the journey, although his feet are a little sore.

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December 12, 1909

HAND BITTEN BY TAME BEAR.

Frank Lewis Tried to Pet Bruno at
Hippodrome.

A young man walked into No. 4 police station at 11 o'clock last night and asked that one of his hands be given medical attention. While taking in the sights at the Hippodrome in the earlier part of the night he had tried to pet a tame bear which is kept in a cage near the entrance of the Hippodrome. The bear closed down one of his hands and left several deep impressions with its sharp teeth.

The patient gave his name as Frank Lewis, 1617 Genesee street, and said that he was a salesman for Mitchell & Rouse, a commission company at the stock yards. He was attended by Dr. F. A. Hamilton and sent home.

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December 12, 1909

BIDS MOTHER GOODBY; DIES.

Samuel Trainor Drank Carbolic
Acid to End His Life.

Samuel Trainor, a packing house employe, living with his aged mother at 1316 Wyoming street, Kansas City, Kas., yesterday afternoon committed suicide by drinking the contents of a three-ounce bottle of carbolic acid. Trainor was 43 years old and had been working steadily.

Mrs. Trainor said yesterday that her son had come into the room where she was sitting about 4:30 o'clock in the afternoon and placed a bottle on the table.

"Well, goodby mother," he said, as he walked from the room. After leaving his mother the man walked into a bed room and lay down on the bed. When found a short time later he was dead.

The body was viewed by the Wyandotte county coroner. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.

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December 11, 1909

TO WORK UP SPANGLER CASE.

Detectives Will Hunt Evidence
Against Three Boys.

At the request of the prosecuting attorney, two detectives were detailed yesterday from the police department to work up the evidence against the three boys held at the county jail for the supposed murder of M. A. Spangler, the saloonkeeper.

"They will be held on the highway robbery charge until the evidence in the murder case can be worked up," said Virgil Conkling. "If an attempt is made to get them released on bond, the murder charge will be filed against them."

Mr. Conkling denied that the prisoners had been "sweated" Thursday afternoon. "We merely talked to them to get their story. Six men were present in the room," he said.

The boys who are being held are Louis M. Dye, Harry Shay and Ralph A. Clyne.

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December 11, 1909

DENIED ENTRANCE, HE SHOOTS.

Man Claiming to Be Policeman
Wanted to Search House, Escapes.

When William Peterson, 9 East Seventh street, answered a knock at his door last night he was confronted by a man announcing himself a policeman and demanding the privilege of searching the house. Peterson asked for credentials and when they were not forthcoming he denied the man entrance.

At that juncture the alleged policeman drew a revolver and fired, two bullets piercing Peterson's right thigh and another shattering the thumb on the right hand. The assailant then fled. While making an effort to run on a slippery pavement he was seen by William Jones, proprietor of a rooming house across the street, to fall down and roll in the slush. He has not been arrested. Peterson was taken to the emergency hospital and treated.

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December 11, 1909

FATHER AND BROTHER DEAD.

Now Patrolman Ganzer's Mother Is
Dying at Lee's Summit.

In the last ten days Charles Ganzer, a police patrolman, has lost his father and brother, and his aged mother now lies at the point of death at Lee's Summit, Mo. The father, George Ganzer, died ten days ago. Yesterday morning William Ganzer, a brother, 24 years old, died on his farm near Hickman Mills. At last reports the officer's mother was reported very low. The funeral of the brother will take place at the Lee's Summit cemetery this afternoon. He will be buried in the family lot.

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December 11, 1909

SPENT $7.50 ON HER
SAYS PARDONED WOMAN.

Fined $500, Mrs. Cross Agrees to Go
With Brother to Ohio and Leave
Aged Admirer of McLouth, Kas.,
Alone.

Mrs. Ada Cross, 40 years old, who is alleged to have been in a plot to swindle an old man named Kenyon, 85 years of age, of McLouth, Kas., and who was fined $500 in the municipal court December 4 on a technical charge of vagrancy, was paroled yesterday by the board of pardons and paroles. She left last night with her younger brother, Fred A. Spray, for Kirkland, Ind., where he told the board he would make a home for her. She never had been arrested here before.

About last August, so the testimony ran in court, the aged man told a friend that he would give $1,000 for a "nice, good wife." The word reached a real estate dealer here, it was said, and Mrs. Cross went to McLouth, where she met Mr. Kenyon.

After being requested to leave the hotel there, the woman went to Lawrence, where a letter to the aged would-be Benedict soon took him. While there the two became engaged, he paying all the bills. From Lawrence the woman is alleged to have gone to Indiana, where she wrote that she had raised the money on a mortgage. After that she was heard from in three cities in Old Mexico, where she is said to have tried to get Mr. Kenyon to invest in land, later trying to get him to sign notes with her in the purchase of a $2,500 hotel in Kansas City.

All of this caused the old man to investigate through the police, and the woman was taken into custody. Mrs. Cross said that $7.50 paid for her hotel bill at Lawrence was all that the aged Lothario had spent on her. Kenyon's son arrived on the scene and assured the authorities that he would take his father home and have a guardian appointed for him.

Mrs. Cross, thoroughly repented, assured the board yesterday that she would go home with her brother, who has a wife and three children on a farm near Kirkland, Ind., and remain there.

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December 11, 1909

WISHED FOR KANSAS SNOWS.

Orphan Boy, Traveling Alone, Had
No Other Cares.

"I am Raymond Joy, an orphan, and I am on my way to Reuben Joy, Reserve, Kas. Conductors please look after me."

This inscription was printed on a card pinned to the coat of Raymond Joy, 6 years old, who is on his way to his uncle, where he is to make his home. Raymond has lived with an uncle, Jack Joy, at Houston, Tex., since his parents died five years ago. Recently his uncle in Kansas asked that he be permitted to live with him, and the arrangements for the trip were made.

"Will there be lots of snow in Kansas?" he anxiously inquired of everyone who would stop for a moment and talk with him at the Union depot last night. Half an hour before train time he bought two postal cards. He could not write, so he dictated a note to Miss Mildred Swanson at Houston.

"Dear Mildred," it read, "please write to me often at Reserve, Kas. Lovingly, Raymond."

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December 10, 1909

HUNDREDS AT SCENE
OF ROSEDALE KILLING.

DEPUTY'S MURDERER HAD BEEN
DRINKING AND DANGEROUS.

Compelled Two Men at Point of Re-
volver to Imbibe, Then Carry
Suit Case of Ammunition --
No Funeral Arrangements.

Hundreds of persons yesterday afternoon in Rosedale went over the route of the running fight of Wednesday night which resulted in the murder of C. Q. Lukens, a Wyandotte county deputy sheriff, and the subsequent killing of Charles T. Galloway, the slayer. The home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., where the besieged man was finally captured after a desperate battle with Missouri and Kansas officers, came in for a good share of attention.

In the investigation yesterday circumstances came to light which, had they been known at the time by Lukens, probably would have prevented the double killing. From many sources it was found that Galloway had been drinking heavily preceding the shooting, and was in a dangerous mood during the day. He had made numerous attempts to find his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway, with the avowed intention of taking her life. At the point of a revolver he forced W. E. Tompkins and James Creason to drink with him and later to assist in carrying a suitcase full of ammunition.

ENTERED THE LAWYER'S HOME.

About 6 o'clock Wednesday morning he entered the home of Rush L. Fisette, the attorney who had brought divorce proceedings on behalf of Mrs. Galloway. the half crazed man insisted on searching every room in the house in the hopes of finding his wife. He left without causing any trouble, but with threats that he would kill his wife. It was Mr. Fisette who notified the sheriff's office in Kansas City, Kas.

Mrs. Galloway was prostrated yesterday by the events of the night before. The story of her fourteen years of married life included threats by her husband, who beat her and drove her from the house. Always following a hard drinking spell the man became half crazed and in this condition seized a gun or any weapon and attacked his wife. At other times he spoke in the most endearing terms to her. Mrs. Galloway remained yesterday at the home of her sister, Mrs. James L. Connor, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale.

LUKENS WELL LIKED.

In Kansas City, Kas., and Argentine, where Lukens had been known for years, the man was respected and liked. At the home of his widowed mother in Argentine the aged woman refused to be comforted.

The body of Lukens had been removed to Simmons's undertaking rooms in Argentine. Funeral arrangements have not been completed. Charles Quincy Lukens was a member of the Brother hood of Railway Trainmen in Argentine and also was a member of Aerie No. 87, Fraternal Order of Eagles, in Kansas City, Kas.

POST-MORTEM EXAMINATION.

A post-mortem examination of the body of Galloway, conducted by Coroner Harry Czarlinsky yesterday morning at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms, showed that the bullet entered his right side and taking a downward course pierced the liver and passed out the left side. A coroner's inquest will be held at 10 o'clock Monday morning.

In a letter received by Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle yesterday afternoon from Chief of Police Wiley W. Cook of Kansas City, Kas., the chief said:

"Especially do I wish to express my highest commendation of Detectives Ralph Truman and J. W. Wilkens, who at the risk of their lives led the attack that effected Galloway's capture."

WANTED HIM TO DRINK.

W. E. Tompkins, employed at the Gates undertaking establishment in Rosedale and who lives at 505 Southwest boulevard, Rosedale, said he was passing in front of Galloway's home at 428 College avenue shortly after noon on the day of the double tragedy when he was accosted by Galloway and told to hold up his hands. At the same time Galloway pointed two large revolvers in the face of Tompkins and told him to follow him into the house. Tompkins followed.

When they reached the inside of the house James Creason, an electrician who helped Galloway on electrical work, was sitting there. Galloway insisted that Tompkins take a drink from a large quart bottle of whisky.

FEARED FOR HIS LIFE.

"I finally talked him out of that," Tompkins said, "but during the two hours he kept Creason and me imprisoned in the house Galloway drank at least three-fourths of the quart of whisky. He sowed us a Winchester shotgun and a Winchester rifle and a suitcase full of ammunition. He said to us: 'Do you know what I am going to do with these,' and when we answered negatively he said he was going to 'raise hell tonight.'

"We pleaded with him to let us go, as I was afraid every minute that he would get wild and kill both of us. He finally agreed to let us go if we would carry the guns and ammunition down to Creason's home on Bell street. Creason led two bird dogs and carried the guns, and I carried a heavy coil wire belonging to Galloway, and the suit case fu ll of ammunition. My load got heavy, though, and I left all of the stuff at Young's store at College avenue and Oak street. Creason, I suppose, took his stuff on down to his place, and then Galloway came back up and got what I had left."

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December 10, 1909

YOUTHS "SWEATED";
STILL DENY CHARGES.

EXAMINATIONS MADE IN VAIN
BY WOODSON.

Shay Says He Can Prove He Was at
Theater on Night of One Hold
Up, the Victim of Which
Identifies Him.

The three youths, Louis M. Dye, Ralph A. Clyne and Harry Shay, locked up in the county jail charged with highway robbery and suspected of the Spangler murder, were subected to a series of rigorous examinations yesterday by Assistant Prosecutor Norman Woodson. His efforts in "sweating" the prisoners so far have met with no success. The trio deny every charge made against them and with the exception of numerous identifications, the authorities have obtained no evidence that might help toward conviction.

The matter is at present entirely in the hands of the prosecutor's office, the case having been taken from the police department.

SHAY IS WORRIED.

Shay is profuse in assurances that he knew nothing of the robberies with which he is charged.

"Of course I am innocent," he says, "but these people whom I never saw before coming in and identifying me a criminal naturally makes me worried. A man swore yesterday that I had held him up at 10 o'clock on the night of December 2. At that time I was a a theater with a friend who can swear to it."

Mrs. Nora Dye, the bride of Louis Dye, visited him yesterday. She remained only a few minutes. Beyond stating that he is innocent, and that he can account for every evening that he had spent away from home for more than a month, Dye refused to talk.

Ralph Clyne is the most talkative of the three. He is in a cell on the third floor of the building in the woman's department and is far more comfortable than his fellow prisoners. He is cheerful and jokes about his surroundings. "Yes, I'm in the state quarters up here," he stated.

DENIES ACQUAINTANCE.

"I can give an account of myself on the occasion of all these hold ups. Before I was arrested I never even knew the names of Dye and Shay. I sued to see them in the morning when I came to work and that was all. I certainly never went any place in their company."

His mother, Mrs. M. Clyne, paid him a visit. "Cheer up mother. I'll be out of here in a week," he told her after kissing her affectionately. "It's no disgrace to be locked up when you are innocent."

Mrs. Clyne had brought him a big package of fruit. "This is like money from home," he said as the jailer pushed the oranges and apples through an aperture in the cell. "I missed your hot cakes this morning at breakfast."

Three more complaints of highway robbery were filed against the prisoners yesterday, and a further examination will be made and more statements taken this morning.

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December 10, 1909

COAL RANGE INTO ITS OWN.

Resurrected, Dust Covered, and
Again Put to Use.

The despised coal range has again been given its place. The big hotels, as well as the smaller hostelries, have pulled the old coal range from out of the dust under which it has lain for a year and the kitchen boys have been kept busy for the last couple of days shoving coal, removing the ashes and keeping the fires clean. The failure of the gas pressure means much to a cook in one of the big hotels, where the orders come fast and where the cooking is timed with mathematical precision. In several of the places the cooks burn gas solely, except for certain classes of chops and steaks, which are broiled over charcoal.

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December 10, 1909

KNIFE THRUST ENDS SPEECH.

Soldier, Fatally Wounded, Unable to
Make a Statement.

As the result of a fight between privates of Troop F, Fifteenth United States cavalry, which occurred at Twelfth and Central last night, Frank McFadden is at the general hospital with a knife wound below his heart which may prove fatal, and John Chrobel is suffering from a badly gashed back. George Pease, who is supposed to have done the stabbing, was arrested by Patrolman J. J. Lovell and is held at police headquarters.

McFadden was hurried to the emergency hospital. Dr. H. A. Pond, seeing that the man was probably fatally injured, sent for Assistant Prosecutor Norman Woodson. Further examination of the man showed that the vagus nerve had been injured, affecting the vocal chords and rendering him in capable of speech, and the prosecutor could take no statement.

The troops at Fort Leavenworth, where the Fifteenth cavalry is stationed, were paid off yesterday and McFaddden, Chrobel and Pease came to Kansas City together. They spent all day in the North end of town and were on the way to a theater when the quarrel occurred.

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December 10, 1909

HOUSEHOLD IS SAVED
BY UNWELCOME PUP.

HIS HOWLING CALLS MASTER'S
FATHER TO A FIRE.

Gas Left Burning, and Pressure Be-
coming Great Early in Morning
Scorches Woodwork, Making
the Pipes Red Hot.

Because of the vigilance of a four-months old pup belonging to E. L. Hayden, at Sixth and Central streets, the nine-room house and probably the lives of Mr. Hayden and his family were saved from destruction by fire early yesterday morning.

As the gas was so low during the early part of the evening Mr. Hayden left the furnace fire going so that the house would be warm the next morning, and turned the flow on to its full capacity.

At about 3 o'clock he was awakened by the continuous howling of his dog in the room below. He went downstairs to investigate the cause.

DOG IN A FRENZY.

The dog was jumping in a frenzy, throwing itself against the basement door. Upon opening the door Mr. Hayden hear gas hissing. He could hardly make his way down the stairs on account of the stifling fumes from scorching wood. Through the smoke he could see the glow of the furnace, which was red hot. The pipes were red with heat almost to where they were connected into the different rooms of the house.

The heat was so intense Mr. Hayden made his way to the gascock, only after he had thrown a blanket over his arm. He then used a poker to turn off the gas.

GAS PRESSURE STRONG.

The pressure after midnight is strong as most people turn the gas off entirely about that time. Mr. Hayden had not thought of this while shivering in the early evening.

The fox terrier pup belongs to Mr. Hayden's son, who is a pharmacist at the Owl Drug store. The dog has been kept in the household much against Mr. Hayden's wishes. Several times when he has been in the country he has tried to lose his son's pet, but "Romeo" has always "come back."

"Now," said Mr. Hayden yesterday, "you bet that dog stays just as long as he wants to. He probably saved our lives." There are three children in the family.

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December 9, 1909

TWO KILLED AND
ONE WOUNDED IN
RUNNING BATTLE.

Charles Lukens, Wyandotte County
Deputy Sheriff, Shot Through
Heart by Charles Galloway, Drink
Crazed Rosedale Electrician, He
Tried to Serve With Injunction.

SLAYER HAD THREATENED
WIFE WHO SOUGHT DIVORCE.

After Killing Lukens, Galloway
Carried on a Retreating Fight
With Other Officers Until
Brought to Bay at 3129
Bell Street.

SHOT BY DETECTIVES, DIES
IN EMERGENCY HOSPITAL.

Double Tragedy Direct Result of
Domestic Difficulties of the Gal-
loways -- Wife, Who Sued for Di-
vorce, Feared for Her Life, Which
Husband Had Threatened -- Re-
straining Order Was to Keep Him
From Further Terrorizing Her.
Murderer of Peace Officer, Who Was Slain as He Fled From Posse.
CHARLES T. GALLOWAY.

Two men are dead and another wounded as the result of an attempt by Charles Quincy Lukens, a deputy sheriff of Wyandotte county, Kas., to serve a restraining order upon Charles T. Galloway, a drink crazed electrician of 428 College avenue, Rosedale, Kas., late yesterday evening.

Lukens was shot above the heart and instantly killed during a running fight with Galloway.

Galloway was later brought to bay in a house at 3129 Bell street, and after a desperate resistance was mortally wounded, dying at 11:30 o'clock last night as he was being placed upon the operating table at Emergency hospital.

JUST BACK FROM OKLAHOMA.

Deputy Sheriff Lukens left the Wyandotte county court house yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock with an order from the district court restraining Galloway from annoying or in any way interfering with his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway. The Galloways had been having trouble for several months, and November 23 Mrs. Galloway, through her attorney, Rush L. Fizette, 1255 Kansas City avenue, Rosedale, filed a suit for divorce, alleging cruelty, drunkenness and ill-treatment.

Since the filing of the divorce petition Galloway had beaten his wife and threatened her life. She then applied for an order restraining him from bothering her. The order was granted several weeks ago, but Galloway had been in Oklahoma during that time. Yesterday word was received at the sheriff's office that he was in town, and Lukens was sent to serve papers on him.

QUARTER-MILE RUNNING FIGHT.

Mrs. Galloway has been staying for the past few days at the home of her sister, Mrs. J. L. Connor, at 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale. The deputy sheriff and Marshal Drew thought perhaps they might find Galloway hanging around there, as he had visited the Connor home earlier in the day and made demands to see his wife and children.

The officers reached Kansas City avenue and Washington street about 5:30 o'clock, and met Galloway shortly after they stepped off the car. Marshal Drew spoke to Galloway and shook hand with him. Lukens then shook hands with Galloway, and told him that he had some papers to serve.

Almost instantly Galloway drew a revolver and opened fire on the officers, who, unprepared for such an emergency, had to unbutton their overcoats before they could get at their weapons. They at last got hold of their revolvers and opened fire on Galloway. A running fight was kept up for more than a quarter of a mile.

The fleeing man turned into alleys, turning back every few steps to fire upon the pursuing officers. He finally reached Rosedale avenue, and turning south ran toward the tracks of the Frisco railroad. When the officers reached the tracks he turned and fired at Lukens, hitting him directly over the heart.

LUKENS FALLS DEAD.

Lukens staggered, and after grasping a telegraph pole with both hands fell to the ground dead. Galloway then ran south, and after a vain attempt to make his escape on a horse, abandoned the horse, and fled to the woods on the hills around Gray's park.

Officer Drew ran to Lukens's assistance, but finding him dead, started to pursue Galloway. He fired the last shell from his gun, and then finding himself without ammunition sent a boy after some. A large crowd of persons had been attracted by the firing, and a number of them assisted in taking the body of Lukens to a barber shop at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues. The coroner was notified, and he ordered the body taken to the Gates undertaking rooms in Rosedale, where he performed a post mortem. It was found that the bullet had pierced the heart and lungs, and had gone entirely through the body, coming out near the middle of the back.

GALLOWAY BROUGHT TO BAY.

The sheriff's office was notified in Kansas City, Kas., and Under Sheriff Joseph Brady, deputies William McMullen, Clyde Sartin and George Westfall jumped into an automobile, driven by George E. Porter, an undertaker at 1007 North Seventh street and rode at break neck speed to Rosedale. The Kansas City, Kas., police were also notified and Chief W. W. Cook led a large force of uniformed men and detectives to the scene of the murder. The citizens of Rosedale also turned out in large numbers and the hills around Rosedale glittered with the lights as these posses scoured the woods in an effort to find the murderer.

At 9 o'clock last night Galloway was cornered in the home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., which he took possession of forcibly.

Barricading himself in a closet upstairs he held his pursuers at bay for over two hours. A posse consisting of nearly 100 men guarded the house on all sides. the air was tense with tragedy, and the bitter cold of the winter night added to the unpleasantness of the whole affair. Every man knew that a desperate fight was inevitable and that Galloway would have to be taken either dead or helplessly wounded.

MISSOURIAN LEADS CHARGE.

A delay was occasioned by the fact that the Kansas officers were outside of their jurisdiction, and did not feel that they had a right to enter the house, which is built on Missouri soil. Missouri officers were summoned and arrived at about 10 o'clock. The plans were laid and great precaution was taken in every step taken, for the officers realized that they were at a great disadvantage in forcing their way into the house, which they knew held a man who had already killed one officer and who would not hesitate to kill others should they press him too hard.

Finally the attack was planned and at 11:30 o'clock a squad of detectives consisting of Joe Downs, Billy McMullin, Harry Anderson and J. W. Wilkens, the latter a Missouri officer, leading, forced their way into the house, and after cautiously searching all the downstairs rooms without finding Galloway, rushed up the narrow stairs to the second floor.

When the officers reached the second floor a volley of shots rang out. Another volley followed. Breaking glass and a great commotion could be heard in the street below.

LAST WORD FOR HIS WIFE.

Then a husky voice was heard to shout:

"We got him."

In entering a dining room the officers were reminded of the presence of Galloway by three shots fired in rapid succession. The officers responded with a dozen shots and bullets went whizzing in every direction, embedding themselves in the walls. One bullet passed through the sleeve of Detective Wilkens's overcoat and lodged in the thumb on the left hand of Harry Anderson, a Kansas City, Kas., detective.

Within a twinkling a bullet entered the abdomen of Galloway and he fell to the floor, rolling into a dark kitchen adjoining the dining room. Writhing in his great pain, the man rolled frantically about the floor.

"Oh my dear wife, my own wife, my darling wife," he moaned time and again. Then he pleaded for ice water, clutching his parched throat madly.

An ambulance was called and Galloway was taken to emergency hospital, where he died just as they were lifting him to the operating table.

ANOTHER WOMAN'S LETTER.

Drs. Harry T. Morton and C. A. Pond, who were in attendance, pronounced death due to a wound from several buckshot that had entered the left side of the abdomen and after penetrating the intestines came out of the right side.

His pockets were searched while on the operating table. The contents consisted of a pocket-book containing $55 in cash, a gold watch and chain, a pack of business cards, several boxes of revolver cartridges, a bank book on the Fort Worth, Tex., State bank, and a letter.

The letter, which was written in lead pencil, was so blood soaked that it was barely legible. As far as it could be deciphered it ran as follows:

"Dear Friend -- I hear that you are getting a divorce from Mrs. G. ----- she is selling all your things and ---- I don't see where Mrs. G. or the boys is at. They act disgraceful, never coming home. --- Good luck, your loving Nan."

Lukens, whom Galloway shot down, was one of his best friends and so was Marshal Billy Drew, whom he fired at time and again in an effort to kill.

ASKS FOR FOOD.

The house where the shooting occurred is a two-story frame structure containing four apartments. The front apartment is occupied by Cecil Patterson and his family, and the rear apartment of four rooms by J. E. Creason, his wife and their little daughter.

"It was about 8 o'clock when Galloway came to the house," said Mr. Creason. "He was greatly excited and told me he had been in a shooting scrape and had shot a man. He said that they, meaning the officers, were after him and he did not know what to do. I told him that the best thing for him to do was surrender. He said: 'No, I'm not ready yet.'


Mr. and Mrs. Creason, Who Fed Galloway and Tried to Persuade Him to Surrender.
MR. AND MRS. J. E. CREASON,
In Whose Home Galloway Took Forcible Possession and Held Out Against a Posse Until Forced to Run for His Life When a Bullet Ended His Career

" 'Give me something to eat first and I will think about it,' he said. I have known Galloway for several years and worked for him at my trade as an electrician. He had always been a good friend and I saw no wrong in giving him something to eat and told my wife to fix him something. She fried some chops and potatoes and made some coffee for him. He tried to eat, but he was nervous and he could hardly swallow.

THE POSSE COMES.

"All this time my wife and I tried to find out just who he had shot and what the shooting was about, but he would put us off with the one answer, 'I will tell you when I am ready.' After supper he sat in a corner and seemed to be in a deep study. He paid no attention to our little girl, who seemed to annoy him by her childish prattle.

"I did not know what to do, so thought I would take a walk in the fresh air. I had hardly gotten 100 feet from the house when I met some people from Rosedale. They told me that Galloway had killed the undersheriff and that they were after him. I told them that he was in my house, but warned them not to go after him, as I feared he might use one of the weapons he had there. I told the crowd that I would endeavor to get him to surrender. I went back to the house. Galloway was still sitting in the corner, but jumped up w hen I came into the room.

" 'They know where you are,' I told him. 'Why don't you surrender?' 'I am not ready yet,' he said. I could get nothing more from him. Half an hour later some of the officers came into the ho use. I went downstairs and told them that Galloway was upstairs, but that he was armed and that it would be dangerous for them to go up there at that time. My family was up there, too, and I did not want my wife or daughter to be shot in case Galloway or the officers started shooting.

REFUSES TO SURRENDER.

This turned the posse back for a while and I made another effort to get Galloway to surrender. He still refused and I called to my wife and daughter and we went to the front of the house in Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Patterson's rooms. We left the gas burning in the dining room and the hall. The bedroom, in the closet in which Galloway took refuge, opened from the dining room by big folding doors as you see. The gas mantle on this lamp was broken and it was not lighted. We all remained in the front room until the posse called to us to come out of the house. As we went out I again told Galloway to surrender; that the house was surrounded and he could not get away, or if he did that he would have to jump to the house next door and climb down the side of the house.

" 'I am not ready yet,' were the last words he said to me. I felt as if the officers would not take Galloway alive and I feared that several might be killed. I was so nervous I did know what I was doing or saying. All I thought of was to prevent any more bloodshed.

"After we left the house we went into Griffin's home next door. We had hardly gotten inside when the shooting began. I put my fingers to my ears so that I would not hear the shots.

SURE HE WAS CRAZY.

"Galloway must have been out of his mind. He could have escaped from the house several times after he knew that the officers had him spotted and he could have held that staircase with his guns against 100 policemen. Why he refused to surrender and then retreated into the clothes closet where he was caught like a rat in a trap can only be explained by my opinion that he was crazy.

"Galloway brought the rifle and the shot gun over to the ho use this afternoon. He also brought a suitcase full of ammunition. This was before he did the shooting. He told us that he was going hunting and he wanted to leave his guns at our house. We had no objections to this as we had always been the best of friends. After we left the house he must have taken his rifle and gone into the closet. He left his shotgun in a corner in the kitchen."

THREATENED TO KILL WIFE FOR YEARS.

Mrs. Anna Galloway, wife of Charles Galloway, has been living with her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Connor, at their home, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale, ever since she instituted divorce proceedings against her husband. For over forty-eight hours she has been a prisoner in that home, fearing even to step out, lest Galloway be near, ready to fire at her, as he had repeatedly threatened to do.

When seen last night after the killing of Deputy Sheriff Lukens, she was nearly in a state of nervous prostration. She had witnessed the start of the tragic escapade from a window in her room . She saw the officer attempt to serve papers on her husband. She heard the ensuing shots and then fell in a swoon.

"Oh, I knew it would come to this terrible end -- I knew it, I knew it," she moaned, as she paced nervously up and down the floor. "Charlie has had murder in his heart for thirteen years and I have always realized that it would only be a matter of time until the impulse would control him. He wasn't sane; he couldn't have been.

"Five times since Priests of Pallas week he has threatened to kill me, and from one day to another I never knew if I would see daylight again. Today some stranger 'phoned from a saloon to be extremely careful, as he had heard Charlie say that this would be the last day I could live. Marshal Drew remained with me to protect me and he has been in our house here all day.

"The first time Mr. Galloway ever threatened me was thirteen years ago. I should have left him then, but I thought he would get over his insane notions and I wanted to make a success of our married life if at all possible. He did reform and was better to me for some time, but when our two children, Harvey and Walter, were old enough to run around a great deal he began abusing me terribly and many times told me he would kill me. He became a harder drinker every year and would get in such a condition that no one could manage him at all.

"Many times as he choked me, and more than once has the end seemed so near that I could not possibly escape, but God has been with me for my children's sake I guess."

VICTIM WELL KNOWN IN WYANDOTTE.

Charles Quincy Lukens was 33 years old. He lived with his widowed mother, Mrs. Sarah Lukens, 336 Harrison street, Argentine. He was unmarried. He was appointed deputy sheriff by Sheriff Al Becker about one year ago. Before his appointment Lukens was constable and later marshal of Argentine for several terms. He had also served on the Argentine fire department. "Charley" Lukens was known by everyone in Argentine, both old and young, and also had a wide acquaintance thorugout the county. He was regarded as a very efficient officer, and had a reputation for fearlessness.

Besidses his mother he is survived by four sisters and four brothers. The sisters are: Mrs. Lydia Jones of Girard, Kas., Mrs. Beulah Robinson of 1108 East Twenty-fourth street, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs. C. A. Hare of Faircastle, O., Mrs. Leonard Eshnaur of Terminal Isle, Cal. The brothers are J. R. Lukens of Oklahoma City, Ok., and L. B, J. E., and F. D. Lukens of Argentine.

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December 9, 1909

TIME TO GET OUT SKATES.

The Parade, Fifteenth Street and
Paseo, Will Be Flooded Today.

The Parade, Fifteenth street and Paseo, will be flooded today, preparatory to the formation of ice for skating. The ice in Troost and Penn Valley lakes is not strong enough yet to hold skaters and the park board issued orders yesterday that skaters are to be kept off until the ice gets to be four inches thick.

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December 9, 1909

FUNERAL OF CHRISMAN SWOPE.

Services Yesterday at Presbyterian
Church in Independence.

The funeral of Chrisman Swope, eldest son of Mrs. Logan O. Swope, took place yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Presbyterian church, Independence. Rev. C. C. McGinley, pastor of the church, conducted the service. Mis McGilveray of Kansas City rendered a solo, "Ye Shall Know." Burial was in Mount Washington cemetery.

Miss Lucy Lee Swope, who was in Paris, started home upon receipt of the news of the death of her brother and of the illness of other members of the family.

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December 9, 1909

ST. JOE COLD AND HUNGRY.

Gas Users Suffer by Reason of Short-
age -- Coal Men Can't Supply
Demand for Fuel.

ST. JOSEPH, MO., Dec. 8. -- Zero weather, with natural gas cut off in many parts of the city, leaves patrons shivering and suffering here tonight. General Manager K. M. Mitchell of the gas company announced that 750,000 cubic feet held in reserve in the great tanks of the company would be turned into the mains for patrons to use in preparation of the evening meal. The supply was turned on all right, but disappeared before it reached the suburban residences. Cold and scanty dinners added to the anger and discomfort of gas patrons.

Coal men are unable to meet the immediate demands for fuel. Manufacturing plants and public school buildings likely will be compelled to close tomorrow unless the gas supply is improved. Officers of the gas company can give no assurances of an improved condition.

There is a demand that artificial gas be manufactured to tide over recurring shortages of the natural product from Oklahoma and Kansas fields, but in this event charges for gas for fuel and lighting will be quadrupled.

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December 8, 1909

BOYS IDENTIFIED AS
SPANGLER'S SLAYERS.

ROBBERS' VICTIMS RECOGNIZE
TRIO, ONE A BRIDEGROOM.

Elevator Operators, Ages 17, 19 and
21, in Downtown Dry Goods
Store, Are Arrested -- Youngest
Weeps, Others Indifferent.
Louis Dye, Ralph Clyne and Harry Shay, Suspects in the Spangler Murder.
LOUIS M. DYE, RALPH A. CLYNE AND HARRY SHAY,
Three Suspects Held by Police for Spangler Murder and Recent Holdups.
(Sketched at Police Headquarters Last Night.)

Working on the "boy bandit" theory, the police yesterday evening arrested three youths, two of whom were identified as having shot and killed M. A. Spangler and wounded Sam Spangler, his son, in their saloon at Twentieth street and Grand avenue on the morning of November 23. Their names are Louis Dye, 21 years old; Ralph Clyne, 19, and Harry Shay, 17. All are employed as elevator operators in a down town dry goods store. Dye is a bridegroom.

The arrest was made at 5:30 o'clock by Captain Walter Whitsett and Plain Clothes Officers E. M. Smith and E. L. Maston.

VICTIMS VISIT STORE.

The officers visited the store in company with several recent victims of holdups and rode in the elevators with the boys as they were at work. They were arrested and taken to police headquarters. Albert Ackerman, 502 1/2 Wyandotte street, the man who was in the Spangler saloon at the time of the shooting, was summoned and in Captain Whitsett's office identified Dye and Clyne as the two who shot up the saloon.

"That's the fellow that had the gun," Ackerman stated, pointing at Dye. "The other fellow was with him. Of course they are dressed differently now, but there is no mistaking their faces."

Four others who have been robbed recently visited police headquarters in the evening and in every case identified the boys.

DRUGGIST IDENTIFIES.

W. S. McCann, a druggist, living at 1405 East Tenth street, identified Dye and Clyne as the two men who attempted to rob his store at Twenty-seventh street and Agnes avenue on the night of November 25. He said they went in the store, and that Clyne pointed a revolver at his head while Dye attempted to rob the cash register. When he showed fight they fired four shots at him and ran. He thinks that Harry Shay is the man that was left outside as a look out.

Miss Stella Sweet, 529 Brooklyn avenue, and Mrs. C. L. Flaugh, 629 Brooklyn avenue, who were held up Thanksgiving night on the steps of the Admiral Boulevard Congregational church, identified all three of the boys as the robbers.

Edward C. Smith of the Smith-McCord-Townsend Dry Goods Company declared that the three boys had robbed him on Thirty-sixth street, between Locust and Cherry streets, on the night of December 3. They took a pocket book containing a Country Club bond for $100. At that time they had handkerchiefs tied over their faces, but Smith was sure that he recognized them.

SPANGLER TO SEE TRIO.

Captain Whitsett made no attempt to cross-examine the boys last night, but ordered them locked up until this morning when they will be confronted by further witnesses, the chief of whom will be Sam Spangler, who was discharged from the general hospital yesterday. The prosecutor's office was notified and representatives will be on hand today to take their statements.

"I am sure that we have got the right men this time," stated Captain Whitsett. "They answer the description of the gang that have been doing all the robbing lately, and I am sure that it was they that held up Joseph B. Shannon last week."

None of the boys would make any statement except that they were strangers in town, only having been working for a week. During the identification process both Dye and Clyne showed indifference, while the younger boy, Shay, broke down and cried.

Dye lives at 1921 Oakland, Shay at 1242 Broadway and Clyne at 1710 East Thirteenth street. Dye was married three weeks ago, shortly before the Spangler murder.

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December 8, 1909

SQUARE DEAL FOR HORSES.

Humane Society Busy Detecting
Smooth Shoes on Slippery Streets.

For the past two days the Humane Society has been busy in an attempt to give the horses of Kansas City a square deal. The sudden fall of snow, which made the downtown streets slippery, caught teamsters and horse owners unprepared, their animals wearing smooth shoes.

Last Monday Humane Agent Frank E. McLreary, in addition to his regular duties, appointed a field force of a dozen men. The streets are being patrolled thoroughly during the day and late into the evening. If any animal is seen making a vain attempt to struggle up a steep grade its shoes are examined and, if in bad condition, it is taken from the shafts and to the nearest blacksmith shop. The smithies are working overtime, most of their business being at night. An officer patrols the vicinity of the blacksmith shops and sees that the line of animals awaiting their turn in the streets are properly blanketed and protected from the cold.

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December 8, 1909

DEAD AVIATOR WAS FEARLESS.

Bernard Well Acquainted With Fer-
nandez, Killed While Flying.

M. Fernandez, the French aviator who met a tragic death at Nice, France, Monday, when a motor on his aeroplane exploded at a height of 1,650 feet, had contracted with K. L. Bernard to participate in a number of aero contests to be held in this country next year, one of which is to be held in Kansas City.

"I was well acquainted with Fernandez," said Mr. Bernard at the Hotel Baltimore last evening. "He was a fearless aviator and told me several times that he would show some of the other aviators something when he got his machine going just right. He evidently was making good his word, for, according to the press reports, he attainted a record-breaking height when the accident occurred.

"I am at a loss to understand the reason for the accident. The motor itself could not explode, or, if it did, this explosion would simply mean the fracture of a cylinder. This would stop the engine, but would hardly cause the machine to collapse. It is probable that there was some defect due to bad wiring, or the gsoline tank sprang a leak and the gases caught fire from the flame from the exhaust, which could lead back to the gasoline tank."

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December 8, 1909

K. C. HORSES BEST IN WORLD.

Win All French Coach Class Prizes
at International Show.

A clean sweep of all the prizes in every class of the French coach breed, is the record made by McLaughlin Bros., Kansas City horsemen, at the International Horse Show, held in Chicago last week and continuing this week. William McLaughlin, one of the firm, has returned from Chicago, with one silver trophy cup, and cash prizes aggregating $1,050.

The big prize own by McLaughlin Bros., was the silver loving cup, the first prize in the grand championship, which was open to horses of all ages, and was won by Decorateur, a chestnut stallion six years old. Decorateur proved a two time prize winner, taking the blue ribbon in the competition of all French coach horses of four years and over.

Two other individual first prizes were also won by the McLaughlin's. In the three-year-old class, Valina, a brown stallion, won the first place. And in the two-year-old class, Balanceur, a bay stallion, took the first prize. Another first prize won by McLaughlin Bros. included best group of five horses in French breed. All the other horses winning the prizes in the last two classes were imported.

All the second prizes were also won by McLaughlin's, in competition with the largest breeders from all sections of the world. Thirty-one horses were taken to Chicago by this firm, from which the prize winners were selected.

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December 8, 1909

TRAINS 1 TO 15 HOURS LATE.

General Snowstorm Indefinitely
Delays Traffic.

At the Union depot last night trains from all directions were from one to fifteen hours late because of the general snow storm.

The Missouri Pacific train from Salina, due here at 1:30 p. m., was stuck in the drifts and indefinitely delayed. The Frisco, due at 5 p. m., late 5 hours. The Santa Fe 116 from the West was delayed 2 hours, and the Santa Fe, second 6, six hours late.

The Rock Island from the South, late 15 hours. It was due at 7 a. m. and arrived at 11 o'clock last night.

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December 7, 1909

HIDDEN POUCH FOUND
IN OLD JAMES HOUSE.

FILLED WITH OPENED LETTERS
ADDRESSED TO A. F. GEORGE.

Sack Discovered by Plumber in
Sealed Closet at 1836 East Ninth
Not Like Those Used By Gov-
ernment in Bandit's Time.
Mail Receptacle Found in Jesse James's Old House.
UNLIKE PRESENT DAY POUCHES.

A rendezvous of Jesse James was recalled yesterday afternoon, when E. N. Watts, who runs a plumbing shop at 1836 East Ninth street, discovered in an old house at 1836 East Ninth street a mail pouch upon which human eyes probably had not gazed for years.

Watts was doing extensive remodeling work on the interior of the house preparatory to its occupancy as a pool hall, when he accidentally broke into a little closet which evidently had been sealed for years. In that aperture he found a mail pouch, filled with mail matter. He dragged the sack to the light and after examining it concluded that it must have been a part of the spoils of the James gang.
USED AS A RECEPTACLE.

Mr. Watts notified the postal authorities and a postoffice inspector was soon on the scene. He examined the pouch and its contents, finding the sack was filled with many letters, all of which had been opened and were addressed to "A. F. George, 609 East Fifteenth street, Kansas City, Mo." The inspector's conclusion was that the sack must have been used as a receptacle for the accumulated correspondence of Mr. George, whoever he might have been.

Closet Where the Pouch of Mail Was Found.
CLOSET WHERE THE POUCH WAS FOUND.

The inspector took the sack and contents to the federal building, where officials, who had been in the service as long as twenty years, examined it closely. They said that although the pouch resembled the official style, it lacked certain necessary features that would justify its identification as ever having been owned by the United states government. The officials were at a loss to know why anyone would try to duplicate the official one used years ago.

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December 7, 1909

SWOPE PARK ZOO KEEPERS.

Board Appoints August Atkinson
Chief and Fred Morrison Assistant.

The park board appointed August Atkinson head keeper of the zoo building in Swope park at a salary of $75 a month, and made Fred Morrison an assistant at $60 a month.

A test is now being made of the steam heating plant for the purpose of regulating temperatures adapted to the different animals that will eventually make their homes in the place. Tomorrow the board will make a personal inspection of the buildings, and just as soon as the members are satisfied that they are habitable for animals the four lions and smaller exhibits already owned by the city will be installed therein.

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December 7, 1909

HOMELESS MEN CITY'S WARDS.

Cold Weather Causes Influx -- Will
Be Worked in Quarry.

The approach of winter is bringing to the city the usual influx of penniless and homeless, and the charitable institutions are beginning to realize it. Yesterday George W. Fuller, a former member of the park board and representing the municipal labor committee in an official capacity, told the park board that Saturday and Sunday night 150 men out of work and money applied to the institute for food and lodgings. Mr. Fuller suggested that the plan of last year, whereby the city and park board co-operated, be followed this year, of working the unemployed in mining rock and crushing it for road building in Penn Valley park. Single men could be fed and lodged at the institute, and men with families could be given supplies on the basis of a dollar's worth a day.

Last year the experiment cost the city $4,918, and about 90 per cent of the rock is piled up and has not been used.

W. H. Dunn, superintendent of parks, said that the idea was a good and commendable one, but the question that confronted the city was what is to be done with the unused rock quarried last year. He said that some of it could be used, but advised that if the city was going into the quarrying business again some disposition should be made of the rock on hand.

Gus Pearson, city comptroller, urged the board to take up the proposition another year.

"It segregates the man who will work from the fellow who will not," said Mr. Pearson.

"And it means that whatever the city gives the Helping Hand to care for the poor and lowly, it will get back in labor and rock," argued Mr. Fuller.

On motion of D. J. Haff the board set apart $2,000 from the West park district fund with which to pay for the rock that is to be quarried and broken at the rate of 80 cents a cubic yard.

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December 7, 1909

BOILER KILLS FOUR,
RIPS BUILDING OPEN.

DRIVER THROWN FROM PASS-
ING WAGON, DIES.

Explosion Occurs While Steamfitters
Are at Work -- Other Men In-
jured -- Pickets Blown Off
Fence Across Alley.
Results of a Boiler Explosion at 908-10 Broadway.
EXPLOSION WHICH COST FOUR LIVES.

By the explosion of a boiler in the basement of the six-story building at 908-10 Broadway at 11 o'clock yesterday morning, Michael Frawley and James Cox were killed outright, and Andrew Meyer and Essie Williams, a negro porter, so badly burned and otherwise injured that they died before nightfall. Two others were badly hurt, and three stories of the rear portion of the building were wrecked. Considerable damage also was done to adjoining structures.

Within two minutes business men and pedestrians in the neighborhood ventured to enter the front door of the building bent on rescuing those who were hurt. The flooring on the first and second stories had been splintered and a heavy partition in the middle of the building had toppled over. Every window glass on two stories had been blown out. Heavy timbers, torn from their places, hung over overhead, and for a time a general collapse of the rear section of the interior of the structure was feared.

The cause for the explosion is not known. Steamfitters employed by Val Wagner & Co., 3918 Main street, were adjusting a steamcock on the boiler, and were preparing to clean out the pipes. They had started to work last Saturday and yesterday morning they put fire under the boiler in order to do the cleaning. There was no forewarning of anything being wrong with the apparatus, and when the explosion occurred Michael Frawley, one of the steamfitters, was on top of the boiler. The boiler had not been in use for some time, and it is supposed that this is accountable for the very bad condition it was in when the workmen began the repairing.

ONE DRIVER IS KILLED.

James Cox, a driver for the Stewart Peck Sand Company, happened to be driving through the alley and had just reached the building when the explosion occurred. He was thrown bodily from the wagon and dashed to death against the brick pavement. C. R. Misner, another driver in the employ of the same firm, sat beside Cox. He too was hurled from the seat, but escaped with a fractured shoulder. Essie Williams, a negro porter, was in the boiler room at the time of the accident, and he was scalded from head to foot by the escaping steam. H e was hurried to the General hospital and died at 3:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Andrew Meyer and W. H. Straubmeyer, plumbers, were at work on the boiler. Both seemed at first to have received minor injuries but Meyer was suffering from shock so he was sent to St. Mary's hospital. He did not rally, and it later developed that he was internally injured. He died at the hospital at 5:40 o'clock.

WHO THE DEAD MEN ARE.

Michael Frawley, 2040 Madison avenue, was unmarried, an orphan, and 28 years old. He has lived in this city all his life. Two brothers, John and Emmett and two sisters, Mary and Kate Frawley, survive. His body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

Meyer, Forty-third and Hudson streets in Rosedale, was well known in Atchison, Kas., where he had worked as a steamfitter off and on for many years. He came to Kansas City recently and went to live with a brother at the Hudson street address in Rosedale. He was 45 years old and unmarried. His body was also taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

If James Cox, 1416 Central street, has relatives living they were not found last night, and it is almost certain they do not live in this city. He was about 35 years old. It is said he was single, but there is another rumor that he has a wife and child somewhere.

Edward Booker, business manager of the local steamfitters' union, said last night that none of the men killed or injured bore union cards. Frawley, he said, was merely a steamfitter's helper. He had once applied for a card in the union, but did not keep up with the requirements, and his membership was finally cancelled.

Essie Williams, 505 East Sixth street, the negro porter, was also a fireman. The whereabouts of his survivors have not yet been ascertained. His body was taken to the Countee undertaking rooms.

The wrecked building is the property of the Homestead Realty Company and is in the charge of David Bachrach, who as the agent, had the renting of the rooms. The block had been unoccupied recently, but the H. K. Mulford Company of Philadelphia was preparing to move its stock in on the third floor.

"It was a terrific shock which seemed to shake the foundation of our building from under us," said C. M. Lyon, president of the Lyon Millinery Company, which occupies the building adjoining on the south. "Several plate glasses crashed and I ran to the front door and out on the street fearing that possibly a second explosion might occur. the damage we suffered was comparatively small, but the fright we were given was large."

The picket fence surrounding the home of Mrs. Thomas E. Moran, 916 Bank street, just across the alley from the wrecked building, was partly demolished by the concussion and many pickets were torn from the fence and blown several feet away.

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December 7, 1909

BOYS FROM FARM INELIGIBLE.

Tendency to "Flat" Feet Keeps
Them Out of the Navy.

"These snows and chilly winds are elements that make our business rushing at this time of the year," said Recruiting Officer Lieutenant C. S. Vanderbeck, "and the boys from the country who do not care to work out in the weather come here to join the navy, with the hopes that they will be sent to more pleasant climes, but most of them are disappointed because they are unable to meet the physical qualifications required by the government. The great majority have what is termed the 'flatfoot,' and are declared ineligible for the service of Uncle Sam."

Out of eleven applicants yesterday, only two were able to pass the physical examination on account of this affliction. It is caused in time of youth where a boy has bone barefoot most of the time, and the arch of the foot is broken down, due possibly because of the carrying of heavy loads.

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December 6, 1909

TYPHOID IN SWOPE HOME.

Niece and Nephew of Philanthropist
Are Ill in Independence.

Typhoid fever has broken out in several places in Independence and the health board expects trouble there. In the household of the late Thomas H. Swope, Margaret and Chrisman Swope, niece and nephew of the philanthropist, are seriously ill, and Dixon, governess of the Swope children, and a housemaid, also are reported affected with the malady.

The presence of the contagion in Independence caused another analysis of the city water. It was found to be in a satisfactory condition and physicians ascribe the cause to unsanitary plumbing or garbage.

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December 6, 1909

MURDER AND SUICIDE
IN HOME OF POVERTY.

BOY 2 YEARS OLD AND DOG
KEEP VIGIL OVER BODIES.

Kansas City, Kas., Baker Kills Wife
and Himself as a Result, It's
Thought, of Jealousy Caused
by Use of Morphine.
Mrs. Myra Campbell, Victim of a Drug Crazed Murder.
MRS. MYRA CAMPBELL.

Neighbors entering the home of Joseph Campbell, 2952 North Seventeenth street, Kansas City, Kas., at 9 o'clock yesterday morning found the dead bodies of Mr. Campbell and his wife on the floor of the stuffy little room which served the double purpose of sleeping and living room. Clasped in the right hand of the man was a revolver. He evidently had murdered his wife, then committed suicide. Crouching down against the bed in one corner or the room, benumbed with cold and fear, was the little white robed figure of a boy, 2 years old, whose crying through the night and early morning attracted the attention of the neighbors and led to the investigation which resulted in the finding of the bodies.

GUN IN MAN'S HAND.

Charles Phillips, 18 years old, who lives next door to the Campbells, and C. R. Lumsdon, another neighbor, were the first persons to make the discovery. The sobs of the baby induced the two men to knock at the door. Receiving no response after repeated knocking they broke the lock and opened the door enough to obtain a view of the interior of the room. The body of the woman was almost against the door. She had remained in a kneeling posture, the head to one side. A bullet had entered below the left breast, passing entirely through the body and lodged under the skin on the right side. The man lay in almost the same position against the south walls of the room and behind the woman. His arms were folded across his breast and the revolver was held tightly against his body. The bullet had passed through the heart. Campbell was a baker. He was 32 years old.
WIFE SOUTH MISSOURI WOMAN.

He was married about three years ago in southern Missouri, where he became acquainted with the girl, Miss Myra Matthews, who became his wife. She was 20 years old. Although worn and haggard she bore the traces of having been beautiful. Insane jealousy on the part of the husband is the reason attributed for the murder. The bodies were viewed by the coroner and taken to the undertaking rooms of Fairweather & Barker.
Joseph Campbell, Who Killed His Wife and Then Himself.
JOSEPH CAMPBELL.

The killing of the innocent wife and the subsequent suicide of the murderer was but the logical climax of the events which mark the life of Joseph Campbell. Although for weeks Campbell has spoken of domestic troubles, even going so far as to consult Chief of Police W. W. Cook, and on numerous occasions threatening to buy a revolver and "end it all," it is believed by those who knew him best that these troubles and the consequences had their inception in a drug filled brain.

KNOWN AS "MORPHINE JOE."

That the murderer had been addicted to the use of morphine for many years is known, in fact so common was this knowledge that for at least fifteen years he has been known to hundreds of persons in Kansas City, Kas., as "Morphine Joe." A bottle half filled with the drug was found on a chair near the bed.

The police are at a loss to determine at what time the tragedy occurred. The family of William T. Kier, 2950 North Seventeenth street, say that the Campbells were heard pumping water from the cistern as late as 9:30 o'clock last night, but they heard no shots. The family of William Brocket, whose rooms are over those of the Campbells, did not return until about 11 o'clock at night, and no shots were heard by them. Daniel Galvin, a carpenter, living a few doors north, said that he heard a shot around 10:30 o'clock but thought nothing of it.

CHILD AND DOG WITH DEAD.

A scene of utter desolation was witnessed by the men first entering the room. On every side was the evidence of extreme poverty. The ragged covers of the bed, which had not been slept on, were folded neatly back. A few little, cheap pictures adorned the unplastered walls. Despite the cheapness and the poverty there was the touch of a woman's hand, which transformed the scantily furnished room into a home.

The little boy, Earl, crying by the bed where he had stood in the cold during the entire night, and a large dog which stood guard over the dead body of his mistress, were the only living beings in the place of death. The child was hurried to the home of Mrs. C. R. Lumsdon and placed in ht blankets, but the dog growled savagely at the intruders and would not submit to being moved until petted by a neighbor whom he knew.

THE CAMPBELL HOME, KANSAS CITY, KAS.

The news of the murder and suicide spread rapidly over the neighborhood and hundreds of persons gathered about the house. The police were notified and after the bodies had been taken away a guard was set about the house to prevent persons from entering.

The orphan boy will be cared for by his father's mother, Mrs. James B. Grame of 2984 Hutchings street, Kansas City, Kas.

"The news of this awful deed came as a shock to all of us," said Mr. Grame last night. "The fear that something like this would happen has been in our minds for years." The awful condition of Campbell, crazed by drugs, has added twenty years to the age of his mother, who has clung to him through all his troubles.

"It is a matter I cannot discuss, but harsh as it may sound, it is better for the world and better for himself that his life is ended. The thing that hurts me the most is the thought of that poor innocent girl a sacrifice to his drug crazed brain."

Persons living in the neighborhood say that Campbell has made numerous threats against his wife. Mrs. M. J. Cleveland, 2984 Hutchings street, said yesterday that Campbell came to her home Saturday morning and told her that he was going to get a gun and kill the whole outfit, meaning his wife. Practically every person living near them were afraid of the man and it was said that he constantly carried with him a gun and a butcher knife. He had recently secured work at the Armour packing plant.

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December 6, 1909

LONG AND SHORT MEN BUSY.

Victims of Highwaymen Report to
Police the Loss of More Than
$300 on Sunday.

J. S. Hubert, a member of the United Brewery Workers of America, living at 2518 Charlotte, was felled by a blow from behind and robbed of five $20 bills, ten $10 bills and five $5 bills at Twenty-first and Locust at 9:30 o'clock last night by two men, one of whom, he says was very tall and the other extremely short. He says he saw the same men in a saloon at Nineteenth street and Grand avenue Saturday night. Hubert immediately reported the case to police and he was taken to his home by Officer Sherry. Upon examination of his head no signs of where he had been slugged could be found.

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December 6, 1909

CHRISTMAS TREAT FOR
POOR CHILDREN PLANNED.

Large Tree Will Be Prepared in
Convention Hall -- Names Should
Be Addressed to the Mayor.

The Mayor's Christmas Tree association, which was suggested and carried out last year for the first time in the history of Kansas City, is preparing to give the deserving poor children of this city a great treat this Christmas. Elaborate plans are being worked out by the committee. Headquarters have been opened in the Reliance building at Tenth and McGee streets, where contributions will be received, and also the names of the poor. The city will be canvassed during the next three weeks for the names of the children to be placed on the list. Several large Christmas trees will be prepared in Convention hall where the big event is to take place on the night of December 24, and under the direction of the distribution committee the presents will be given to all children who are deemed entitled to receive them.

Names, or suggestions as to distribution of presents, should be addressed to the mayor, and all checks and remittances for the mayor's Christmas tree should be plainly marked and mailed to the city comptroller, Gus Pearson, treasurer of the association for this year.

The members of the executive committee are Thomas Watts, Louis W. Shouse, Jacob Billikopf, M. G. Harman, A. E. Hutchings, Dave McDonnell, Henry Manke, Rev. Charles W. Moore, Steve Sedweek, T. T. Crittenden, John F. Pelletier, Franklin D. Hudson, A. Judah, George F. Damon, Justin A. Runyan, Gus Pearson, H. E. Barker and George C. Hale.

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December 5, 1909

CAMPAIGN TO RESCUE
CHILDREN FROM WORK.

COMPLAINT MADE THAT STORE
EMPLOYS TWO, 4 YEARS OLD.

Picture Shows Where Girls, Under
16, Play and Sing and Will Be In-
vestigated by Dr. Mathias,
Chief Probation Officer.

Parents who permit their children to sing in picture shows in violation of the law, or to participate in any entertainment for which they receive pay, according to Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer, will be prosecuted in the juvenile court.

Heretofore prosecution of child labor cases has been almost entirely on the initiative of the local and state factory inspectors. But complaints have been made recently to the juvenile officers that the practice has not been entirely stopped. An investigation is to be made to find out whether the parents and theaters are obeying the law.

The law forbids children under 14 years of age to engage in any "gainful occupation." Children under 16 can not work for wages without first receiving a permit from the local factory inspector.

This does not forbid parents to allow their children to participate in church entertainments and the like, where they receive no pay.

COMPLAINT AGAINST STORE.

Complaint was made yesterday of a large department store, which is giving a Santa Claus entertainment. Two children, 4 years of age, take minor parts and their parents are paid for their time. With W. J. Morgan, factory inspector, a juvenile officer yesterday went to the store to investigate the complaint, and will report Monday in juvenile court to Judge E. E. Porterfield.

Several picture shows are reported to have employed girls under 16 years of age, without official permits, to play the piano and sing. These cases are to be investigated immediately.

"The child labor law, if anything, is not severe enough," said Dr. Mathias. "It should not only require children to remain in school until they have reached a certain age, but it should keep them in school until they have passed through the graded school into the high school.

"The trouble with the present law is that it is founded on the law of averages. The average boy or girl completes the grammar school at 14 years of age. But think of those who do not go beyond the third or fourth grade. Many children have not reached the high school at 14.

SHOULD HELP ABNORMAL.

"If there is any change in this law it should be re-framed for the benefit of the abnormal, or the child below the average. Every child should be compelled to stay in school until he or she had reached the high school. The child might be 16 or 18 years of age before he is graduated and permitted to go to work, but he would be a much better citizen than if allowed to quit at 14.

"Take for instance the foreigners who are rapidly migrating to Kansas City and other American towns. Many of them have been brought up to believe that a wife or a child is an asset, the same as the old slave holders used to think. Hardly before the child is able to walk and talk the father puts it to work. The boy gets a place in a shoe-shining parlor or holding the horse of some delivery man. The pay is $1 or $2 a week, which is given the parent.

"These foreigners average about one child a year. The more children, they know, the greater their income. If it were not for the child labor laws, these children would be permitted to grow up in ignorance, and their little bodies stunted from doing heavy work before they had gained physical strength."

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December 5, 1909

ART IN A CROATIAN CHURCH.

Beautiful Paintings Now Adorn Edi-
fice of St. John the Baptist.

While the nuns were saying their evening prayers before the alter in St. John the Baptist Croatian Catholic church, at Fourth street and Barnett avenue in Kansas City, Kas., last night, workmen were busy in the rear of the church tearing away a great wooden scaffolding The scaffold has been used during the last six weeks by Oton Tvekovic, an artist, who has been decorating the church after the manner of the Catholic churches in Croatia.

In the alcove above the alter the artist has painted the figures of Jesus and the prophets Jeremiah, Isias and Elias. The figures are somewhat larger than life size and are skillfully executed. In the north alcove of the church the artist has executed a painting thirty-eight feet in length, which represents the prophets, Cyril and Methodus, on their presentation to Prince Rastislav of the Slavonic peoples. Thee picture tells the story of these two apostles who first carried the Christian religion to the Slavs at the close of the eighth century.

An unfinished picture in the south alcove will, when completed, represent the birth of Christ. In the ceiling of the church the pictures of the twelve apostles will be executed. Mr. Tvekovic is a native of Agrin, Croatia. He is a graduate of the Fine Arts institute in Vienna, and is a professor of art in the fine arts schools of Karlsruhe and Munich. He is staying with the Rev. M. D. Krmpotich, pastor of the church. Besides being a portrait painter, Mr. Tvekovic is a landscape artist of note. He has several sketches which he will place on display soon at 416 East Eleventh street, Kansas City, Mo.

Father Krmpotich said last night that his church was the first Croatian church in America to be decorated as are the churches in the mother country. Besides the pictures of the Biblical characters, the church has been decorated in the national colors of Croatia. Several designs peculiar to Croatia have been worked into the decorative scheme, and when finished the interior of the church will present a picturesque and pleasing appearance. Father Krmpotich organized St. John the Baptist parish seven years ago. Since that time a substantial brick church, a rectory and a school have been built. The parish now comprises more than 150 Croatian families, and is in a flourishing condition.

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December 5, 1909

STEW PAN FELL ON HIS HEAD.

Now Herman Smith Sues Former
Employer for $15,000.

A fractured skull caused by a blow on the head with a steel stew pan resulted in the filing of a $15,000 damage suit yesterday in the circuit court by Herman Smith against the Household Fair store.

Smith was employed at the Household Fair to run the elevator. On November 8, while engaged in his regular duties, a stew pan became dislodged from a shelf. It clattered down two or three stories through the elevator shaft, striking Smith on the top of the head.

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December 5, 1909

FONDA MAY LOSE OFFICE.

Sugar Creek Justice Cited Before
Circuit Judge Powell.

Judge Powell yesterday cited A. P. Fonda, justice of the peace of Sugar Creek by appointment of the county court, to appear December 18 and show cause why he should not be removed from office. Charges were filed by Virgil Conkling of the prosecutor's office, alleging the defendant was holding office illegally.

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December 5, 1909

FORMING AN AERO CLUB.

Kansas City Men Anxious to Join
Advanced Organization.

"George M. Myers has just informed me that he has received the names of twenty-five Kansas City men who are anxious to become charter members of the Aero Club, which is to be formed Monday afternoon at the offices of the Priests of Pallas," said K. L. Bernard of New York city, who is interested in aviation meets to be held in this country next year, and who represents a number of European aviators and manufacturers of heavier than air machines.

"Kansas City people are more enthusiastic over this proposition than I dreamed they would be," said Mr. Bernard. "I will remain here until Tuesday or Wednesday of next week or until the club has been formed and application for the membership made to the Aero Club of America. It is necessary for the club to have a membership of forty, but it is probable that there will be 100 Kansas Cityans as charter members of this club."

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December 4, 1909

ZONES OF CONTAGION
NEAR THREE SCHOOLS.

SCARLET FEVER AND DIPH-
THERIA IN SEVERAL SECTIONS.

Tin Drinking Cup Blamed by Medi-
cal Inspectors, Especially at
Benton -- Several Parochial
Schools Involved.

The medical inspectors going the rounds of the public schools have unearthed diphtheria and scarlet fever zones within the confines of Benton, Washington and Karnes schools. They are also learning from the daily returns of practicing physicians, of the existence of the two maladies among pupils of two or three of the parochial schools, but as the authority of the inspectors does not extend to schools of this description Dr. W. S. Wheeler, sanitary commissioner, has not felt justified in taking any voluntary official notice or action.

Of the parochial schools the worst afflicted is St. John's Parochial school, 534 Tracy avenue. This school, located in a district largely inhabited by Italian children, is conducted by the Sisters of St. Joseph. Yesterday Sister Superior Monica appealed to the health authorities to make an investigation. Dr. H. Delamater, chief inspector, made a personal visit to the school and was informed that ninety of the 160 pupils are detained at home by sickness. Within the last six days cases of scarlet fever have developed among the pupils, and Dr. Delameter fears that many who are home at home may have it. He will have an examination made of the school building as to its sanitary condition, and will have class rooms fumigated.

Washington public school is at the southwest corner or Independence avenue and Cherry street, and the Karnes school is at the northwest corner of Troost avenue and Fourth street. Large numbers of the pupils have scarlet fever, the majority of victims predominating among those attending Karnes school. The diphtheria is not as epidemic as scarlet fever. The attendants of these two schools live in the territory bounded on the south by Admiral boulevard, north by the river, west by Grand avenue and east as far as Lydia avenue. The majority of the cases are north of Fifth street and scatter as far to the east as Budd park. As an assistance to the health authorities in keeping in touch with the exact location of the disease, a large map of the city has been prepared, and when a case of diphtheria develops a green-headed pin is driven into the map, designating a particular territory, and when one of scarlet fever is reported the map is perforated with a red-headed pin.

MAP RAPIDLY FILLING.

The map describing the Washington and Karnes school districts is rapidly filling up with the pin indicators, but not as noticeably as the district in which Benton school is situated. At the latter school diphtheria is the most prevalent, and is giving some alarm. The infection is spreading with rapidity. Benton school is at the southwest corner of Thirtieth street and Benton boulevard, in a fashionable and well-to-do neighborhood. There are from twenty to thirty cases of diphtheria among pupils going to this school, and it is feared that the disease got its start from the drinking cups in use there.

"The drinking cup in the public schools is a menace to health and is a communicator and spreader of disease," said Dr. Delamater yesterday. "Its frightful possibilities were fully described by Dr. W. S. Wheeler in his last annual report, and he advises that it be relegated and sanitary fountains installed in the schools. The health of no child is safe when the tin cup is in use. While I am not directly charging the appearance of diphtheria at Benton school to the drinking cup, still there is plenty of room for that suspicion as the school building is new and should be sanitary."

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December 4, 1909

AGED WOOER TO GO HOME.

The Woman in the Case May Be
Charged With Vagrancy.

John Kenyon of McLouth, Kas., the 85-year-old wooer of Mrs. Ada Cross, whose matrimonial affairs were satisfactorily settled at police headquarters last Thursday, will, in all probability, leave leave for his home today in company of his son, Walter, who has come for him.

Mrs. Cross was further examined yesterday and the police placed her under the care of the matron at police headquarters. She will appear in police court to answer a charge of vagrancy.

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December 4, 1909

PLUMBERS MUST STAND EXAM.

New Ordinance Will Be Passed Mon-
day by Council.

Evidently the public is not interested in the proposed ordinance for the regulation of the installation of plumbing and steam heating in homes and buildings, for there was no response yesterday to the call from the upper house of the council committee for the expressions. The ordinance will be reported out favorably, and passed at next Monday night's meeting of the council.

The ordinance provides that the installation of plumbing and steam heating must be performed by men adept in their respective trades, that they must hear the endorsement of a board of examiners to be appointed by the city as to their capabilities and that these examinations shall be held as often as once a year.

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December 4, 1909

INDIAN WIDOW WANTS AUTO.

Guardian Refuses to Buy One, So
She Used a Hired Machine.

"Just wait until my 'guardy' gets back to Pawhuska, and I will be willing to make a wager that he allows me the money to get a machine," said Mrs. Blanche Keeler, the pretty Indian widow who, though very wealthy, has been denied an automobile because Eugene Scott, trustee of her estate, thinks that it would be extravagance for her to have it.

"I could not have used one of my own any oftener than I have a hired one since last Saturday, when I arrived here," said Mrs. Keeler, "so I guess if I come up to Kansas City often enough I could do without one of my own.

"I want an auto for my home in Pawhuska, and I am going to have it. Mr. Scott will come around to my way of thinking. I just know that he will, for it won't be a bit extravagant for me to own a machine, and it will be of much benefit to my health. The ponies and horses are all right, but I want action, something faster than horse-flesh."

With three big trunks packed to their capacity with pictures, new clothes, music and books, Mrs. Keeler departed early this morning for her home in Oklahoma.

"I did not get what I wanted, an auto, but I am taking back with me all the pretty things I fancied while here," said Mrs. Keeler at the Hotel Victoria last night.

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December 4, 1909

CAT ATTACKS A WOMAN.

Enraged Feline Held on Till Head Is
Severed From Body.

While a mad cat, its teeth fastened into the chin of Mrs. F. A. Petitt, clawed and scratched her face in a frenzy caused by the approach of a bulldog, the woman's brother-in-law, summoned by her screams for help, cut the cat's head off with a pocket knife.

Mrs. Petitt's eyes were not injured. Her hand received an ugly wound from the knife.

Mrs. Petitt lives at 3020 College avenue. She was returning home yesterday morning through her back yard from a visit to a neighbor when she picked up the cat, a large maltese, nearly full grown. She petted it. The animal seemed to resent any display of affection.

A large bulldog, belonging to Mr. Petitt, came running from the porch to meet the woman. Crazed with fear, the cat sprang for Mrs. Petitt's face. Its needle-pointed teeth sank into the flesh and held on tenaciously, the cat scratching the woman's face and hands in a terrible manner. For five minutes the woman, screaming and terrorized, battled with the cat. H. M. Roxby, her brother-in-law from Yates Center, Kas., who is visiting at the Petitt home, hearing calls for help, ran to her rescue.

Finding that it was impossible to force the maddened cat to release its hold, Mr. Roxby used his pocketknife to cut its throat.

As the knife blade all but severed the cat's head, it penetrated Mrs. Petitt's hand. Mrs. Petitt fainted.

Dr. Herbert A. Breyfogle dressed the wounds and said that aside from leaving a few scars they will not prove serious. Mrs. Petitt's head is bandaged so that she can hardly eat or talk. She is a linotype operator on an afternoon newspaper.

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December 3, 1909

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
IN CONSULAR SERVICE.

LEON GOMEZ NOW COMES TO
KANSAS CITY.

In 24 Years He Has Found no City
That Suits Him Better and
He Would Like to Stay.
Acting Mexican Consular Leon Gomez.
LEON GOMEZ.

Leon Gomez, until recently stationed at Cagilari, Island of Sardinia, is the acting Mexican consul to this city, filling the office of M. E. Diebold, now at St. Louis. Mr. Gomez is commissioned as consul to St. Louis, but he said yesterday that in his twenty-four years of consular service he had found no city that suited him quite so well as Kansas City and that he hopes to be recommissioned here.

"A city of beautiful boulevards and avenues," he said. "What drives in the summer time! Not in Old Mexico or France or Italy is better to be found. If I can so arrange I will spend a few years here so as to give my family a rest. It will be good for them and me. We of the consular service are nomads, senor."

Personally, Mr. Gomez is of striking appearance. He is about 55 years old, short and well built. His iron gray hair is roached straight back from his forehead. The nose is Roman, the chin and cheekbones equally prominent.

In full dress uniform with his left breast covered with badges of high orders, his pictures (face views) might pass for that of General Diaz. This effect is considerable heightened by the heavy, drooping gray mustache and the absence of the chin whiskers which adorned his features up until a few weeks ago.

WOULD FILL A BOOK.

In keeping with his distinguished appearance is the new consul's experience in government affairs. Unlike the great president, who speaks none but his own tongue, Mr. Gomez is fluent in English, French and Italian, as well as Spanish.

A complete record of this Mexican's travels and experiences would fill a book. He was first appointed as consul to San Diego, Cal., from Guadalajara. After seven y ears there he was changed to Tuscon, A. T., for seven months, then to Panama for three years, back to California for three years, to Texas for a short time, to Belize or British Honduras for fourteen years, to Italy for a year and now to this point awaiting a post in St. Louis.

Mr. Gomez's diplomacy and education has made him a favorite wherever he has been stationed and his knowledge of languages, customs and laws of foreign countries seems to have kept him in good standing with the Diaz government. In 1894 he won a place in the international history as secretary of the international commission which established forever and beyond possible dispute of the boundary line between Mexico and the United States by planting a line of stone monuments from El Paso to the California coast.

On the subject of travel the new consul is an interesting talker, his knowledge of the countries where he has beeen stationed by his government being minute, even in statistics.

CONSIDERS IT UNWISE.

"Every people has its virtues," he says. "By the same token ever people has its faults that are peculiar and found nowhere else under the sun. If a man is to judge a country let him go to it and live five years, speak its language, follow its customs, obey its laws, eat, sleep and think with its inhabitants.

"The United States bids fair to be the greatest nation in the world because it is cosmopolitan. The most enterprising and energetic of all nations naturally migrate here because it is new and promising. Mexico -----"

But Mr. Gomez does not talk much about Mexico; it is more diplomatic not to draw comparisons. There are views which Mr. Gomez undoubtedly could express about his own country beside all others on the sphere, but he does not consider it wise apparently, saying instead:

"Mexico is a great country, too. Growing just like everything and destined sometime to be a power with the rest. It is great in territory, population and in national heart. It is rich in natural resources and its capitol has walks and drives rivaling those of Kansas City itself!"

It is commonly asserted that the fashionable parades of the City of Mexico are equal to those of Paris and the most beautiful on the continent, but Mr. Gomez would rather be excused from saying so in the United States.

"Always, everywhere, I say to the young man: 'Go to Mexico to live.' The people are warm in their hospitality toward strangers and there is money to be made. It is a big country. The laws are congenial and friendly to foreigners. The girls are -- ah, beautiful, senor. It is a most agreeable place in which to live and bring up a family. I say all this to them because it is true and because Mexico can stand a population as cosmopolitan as that of the United States."

With Mr. Gomez when he came here to Kansas City were his wife and three children, who have followed him about the map into all sorts of climates and among widely different kinds of people. They say they have enjoyed themselves everywhere they have been but like California the best.

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December 3, 1909

CALLED ON THE POLICE TO
ARBITRATE LOVE AFFAIR.

John Kenyon of McLouth, Kas.,
Wasn't Sure of His Ground, So
Asked Advice.

Meets an Unromantic Police Sergeant.

The intervention of the police spoiled a runaway marriage yesterday. John Kenyon, a farmer of McLouth, Kas., 84 years old, walked into police headquarters yesterday morning and, producing a letter from his fiancee, Mrs. Ada Cross of Frankfort, Ind., sought the advice of Chief of Police Frank Snow as to his matrimonial affairs. The chief refused to arbitrate and advised John to return to the farm.

Kenyon left headquarters, but a few hours later returned and this time called on the desk sergeant to referee. The sergeant, a big unromantic man, thought that Kenyon was a fit charge for the police matron and after depositing his valuables, some $20 in cash and a bank book showing a healthy balance, in the office safe, Kenyon was escorted upstairs.

Kenyon went to bed, but was not permitted to rest long in peace. Mrs. Ada Cross, in company with several real estate dealers, soon appeared on the scene. They wished to pay the old man a visit and informed Captain Whitsett that Kenyon was negotiation for the purpose of a rooming house on Twelfth street opposite the Hotel Washington. The captain then took a hand in the administration of the old man's finances. Mrs. Cross, on being questioned, admitted that she was engaged to be married to Kenyon and that he had promised to indorse her note for $2,500 for the purchase of the property. She stated that if it had not been for the intervention of Walter Kenyon, the old man's son, who made a trip from McLouth for the purpose of breaking up the marriage, the couple would have appeared before a justice of the peace Sunday.

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December 3, 1909

WELLS AND CISTERNS
MENACE TO HEALTH.

WATER FROM MISSOURI RIVER
SAFER TO DRINK.

City Chemist Says River Water
Causes But Few Cases of
Typhoid Fever.

"Eighty per cent of typhoid fever cases are caused by the use of drinking water taken from springs, wells and cisterns over the city," said Dr. W. M. Cross, city chemist, yesterday.

"The best water is that taken from the Missouri river. When a cistern becomes cracked it furnishes an avenue for the seeping in of sewage and other poisons from the earth.

"Some years ago I made an inspection of wells, springs and cisterns about town. I found that 80 per cent of typhoid fever was among persons who drank water from these sources, especially cisterns that had cracks in them.

"I quickly found that my recommendation that most of these wells, springs and cisterns be abandoned and sealed was not in line with political sentiment. There was too much politics involved in the crusade, so I gave it up."

"Have you ever called the attention of the Crittenden administration to this matter?" the chemist was asked.

"No, I never have," he replied, "but I am going to. The wells and springs and cracked cisterns are a menace to the health of the city and I want to report t hat they produce more typhoid than does the Missouri river. water."

DRINKS MISSOURI WATER.

"Do you drink and use Missouri river water?"

"I drink it as it comes from the faucet. I am not afraid of it, nor should any other healthy person be. Possible it would be well enough for people with weak constitutions to boil it.

"There is no greater amount of typhoid fever in Kansas City now than at this time in previous years. And what there is I am not going to charge up to Missouri river water, so long as I am aware that the city abounds with contaminated springs, wells and cracked cisterns.

"The newspapers contain accounts of a plague of typhoid at Parkville, but it does not follow that because Parkville is located on the banks of the Missouri river and close to Kansas City that our citizens are likely to take the malady from drinking Missouri river water.

"Missouri river water is in pretty good condition now. The bacteria counts are about normal. I feel confident that when sulphate of iron is used to purify it instead of lime and alum there will be a lessening of the bacteria and the purification will be more complete. A carload of sulphate of iron is ow on the way to the city, and just as soon as it gets here we will try some of it on the water."

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December 3, 1909

FORTUNE TELLER ARRESTED.

Man's Complaint Causes Charge of
Not Having City License.

Rosa Adams, 18 years old, who says she has gypsy blood in her veins, and who has been following the occupation of a non-union fortune teller, was arrested by the police yesterday upon complaint of a man who said he paid her fifty cents for a fortune, the result being unsatisfactory.

Rosa and her 2-year-old baby were taken to No. 4 police station, then to Central police station, where they were released on bail. Mrs. Adams told the police matron that she was the sole support of a large family. The charge against the fortune teller is that she does not possess a city license. She says she did not know she needed one.

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December 2, 1909

AFTER TEN YEARS
'GATOR HAS A HOME.

STUFFED SAURIAN'S CAREER
FULL OF VICISSITUDES.

Hoodoo to a Chicago Saloon, Brought
to Kansas City by a Bartender,
and Sold to a Doctor for
a Small Sum.

Homeless, disowned and an outcast, the mounted form of a once giant saurian occupies floor space -- by sufferance only -- in Schaefer's buffet on Wyandotte and Twelfth streets. It changed ownership three times yesterday and is now the property of Dr. James O. Lee, who before he can remove it from the saloon must build an addition to his office.

Ten years ago Dan Flannigan, a saloonkeeper at Twenty-second street and Wabash avenue, Chicago, loaned a curio man $10 on the stuffed "gator," which was twelve feet long, and its age estimated all the way from 1,000 to 2,000 years. A taxidermist said it was worth at least $50 to mount the reptile, so Flannigan thought he was in the clear.

ONCE A SHOW WINDOW PIECE.

Joe O'Brien was a bartender at Flannigan's, and he helped put the gator on a shelf in the saloon. From that time on, it was said Flannigan's business suffered reverses. Whether the look that a man would give the 'gator w hen he stepped in the saloon sobered him or made him think that he "had 'em" or whether the 'gator was just a hoodoo Flannigan never decided.

When O'Brien left for Kansas City five years ago, however, Flannigan gave him the saurian. O'Brien shipped the thing along with his household furniture, and the story is told around the freight house that three pay checks still await the claim of negro laborers who looked in the car.

The 'gator passed into several hands and for a couple of years was a showpiece in an Eighth street saloon. Then it came into possession of Jack Murty of 1031 Wyandotte street, who put it in the window of his cleaning establishment. This show got tiresome after a while and he placed it farther back in his store. All his friends admired it, but none would purchase it.

One day W. C. Schaefer happened in. Yes, he would purchase the stuffed reptile. He would give all of $3 for it. Murty clasped his hand to seal the bargain. Yesterday morning four men carried the 'gator to Schaefer's saloon. Not until it was deposited on the floor did Schaefer realize that an elephant would have taken up less room.

AND THE DOCTOR BUYS HIM.

"Give him to me," said his brother Al.

"All right," responded Schaefer and the deal was closed. A short while later Dr. Lee happened in. He could use the 'gator all right and would give $2.50 for him. Again Mr. 'Gator was sold. Dr. Lee had forgotten to measure him before he purchased him and when he discovered that the reptile was 12 feet long and a yard wide, he discovered that he did not want him as bad as he had a short while before. The Schaefers would not take him back as a gift.

A carpenter gave Dr. Lee an estimate on an addition which will have to be built into his office to accommodate the alligator. Meanwhile "Ivory," the porter, will have to mop around Mr. Gator.

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December 2, 1909

CONFUSING HORSE DEAL.

Animal Twice Stolen, Alleged Thief
Almost Escapes Prosecution.

Charged with stealing the same horse twice, Henry Tobin, who was arrested yesterday on a warrant from Justice Theodore Remley's court, can be prosecuted only on a minor charge of obtaining money under false pretenses.

On November 22, Tobin is charged with having stolen a horse from E. T. McElroy and the following day selling it to W. E. Edwards.

Subsequently McElroy, who had searched the city for his horse, decided to offer a $5 reward for the animal's return. Tobin, it is charged, hearing of this, went to Edwards's stable, stole the horse he had sold only a few days before, returned it to McElroy and was given the $5 reward.

When Tobin was arrested yesterday, McElroy refused to prosecute. But as the stolen horse which had been sold to Edwards did not belong to the latter, Edwards cannot prosecute for horse stealing. The only charge remaining is that of obtaining money under false pretenses.

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December 2, 1909

BOOSTING RIVER NAVIGATION.

Meeting at Commercial Club Tomor-
row Night to Increase Interest.

A special meeting will be held in the Commercial Club rooms tomorrow night for the purpose of creating more interest in the project for improving the navigation of the Missouri river. No solicitations for funds will be made at the meeting.

Walter S. Dickey, president of the company which proposes to establish a boatline on the Missouri, will show 125 pictures of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, some of the pictures being moving scenes. Comparisons between the navigable Mississippi and the Missouri will be brought out, by which Mr. Dickey expects to show conclusively the possibilities of the Missouri.

Moving pictures of the Kansas City delegation going to New Orleans in the Gray Eagle, and the visits of President Taft and other notables will also be shown.

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December 2, 1909

BOY GETS FATHER'S PLACE.

Judge Pollock Appoints Henry Dil-
lard, 19, Court Messenger.

Judge John C. Pollock of the federal court in Kansas City, Kas., yesterday announced the appointment of Henry Dillard, a negro 19 years old of Topeka, to be the messenger of the federal court. Dillard takes the place of his father, Henry Dillard, who shot himself accidentally while hunting last Saturday. Judge Pollock went to Topeka Monday to attend the funeral of the boy's father. At the funeral Judge Pollock noticed the boy and was so impressed by his manly actions that he decided to appoint him as his father's successor.

"The boy is young, but I believe he will be able to hold the position," Judge Pollock said yesterday. "I am going to give him a trial at least."

Henry Dillard, who was part Cherokee Indian and part negro, was messenger of the federal court in Kansas thirty-three years and won the friendship of many attorneys and federal officers.

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December 1, 1909

CHANGE ON "TOUGHEST" BEAT.

"Hoboes' Friend" Transferred From
"Battle Row" to Traffic Squad.

"Battle Row," adjoining police headquarters and generally conceded the "toughest" beat in town, owing to the number of cheap saloons and the rough element, will be patrolled by a new man today. It is the first change in five years.

Patrolman Herman Hartman, "the hoboes' friend," has been transferred to the traffic squad and will be stationed at the intersection of Eleventh and Walnut streets. Hartman is the heaviest officer on the force, tipping the scales at 330 pounds.

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December 1, 1909

DRANK HIS WAY TO JAIL.

Court Is Lenient With Mechanic
Who Pleaded Guilty.

A. R. Davis, a machinist, pleaded guilty yesterday in the criminal court to having broken into a machine shop at Sixth and Bank streets.

"I didn't break into that place to rob," said Davis. "I was merely looking for a place to sleep.

"I am a trained machinist. Ten years ago I was earning $2,000 a year, now I am broke, without a job and blacklisted by the railroads. I have been foreman of machine shops in this city and railroad shops in other places.

"Ten years ago I began drinking. This is my end."

Judge Latshaw did not sentence Davis. He said after the trial that he would keep the prisoner in jail for three or four months, until he got the whisky out of his blood, then parole him. Davis pleaded guilty to a penitentiary charge.

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December 1, 1909

FATHER DALTON ON FRANCHISE.

To Beat It a Public Calamity, He
Declares.

"I am for the extension of the Metropolitan street railway franchise. It would be a public calamity to have it beaten," said Father W. J. Dalton, pastor of the Church of the Annunciation, yesterday.

"Many opinions have been advanced why the franchise should pass, but none has appealed so strongly to me as the appeal of the banking institutions of the city. They represent the heart throbs of the commercialism and progressiveness of Kansas City. How any man can in the face of this common sense presentiment of the issue vote against it is a mystery to me.

"If Kansas City is to grow, it must have adequate street car and transportation facilities. The Metropolitan has been one of the greatest factors in the development of the city. It has spent its millions in paving the way for the great city we have, and it will spend millions more in the development of a greater and more powerful Kansas City if it is but given the chance."

Father Dalton is one of the oldest clergymen in the city, and has always been known as a public spirited citizen, actively identified with every movement for the good of Kansas City.

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December 1, 1909

BOYS SLEEP IN TENTS.

McCune Farm Lacks Sufficient Dor-
mitory Accommodations.

Boys at the McCune farm are compelled to sleep in tents because of lack of accommodations. When the new school building is completed it will have to be used at night as a dormitory. A new addition is being built to the present dormitory and will partially relieve the present crowded conditions.

With the conditions existing, Judge J. M. Patterson thinks some action should be taken at once. A special election has been urged to vote $150,000 in bonds for the erection of five new buildings. At present there are eighty-five boys at the farm, and there are not accommodations for half that number.

"My idea would be for the county court to begin putting up new buildings," said Judge J. M. Patterson yesterday. "An election to vote bond could be held in November to save the expense of a special election. But it is my opinion that the matter should not be put off another day. By another year there will be from 100 to 125 inmates, and the conditions will be worse than ever.

"The county court might erect one building a year for the next five years. But that seems to me to be too slow. We might start the work now and rely upon the money derived from the bond election to complete it.

"The farm became the county's property eighteen months ago. An administration building has been built at the cost of about $1,300. An old frame building is used for a dormitory. These are the only two buildings to accommodate eighty-five boys."

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