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November 26, 1909

15,000 SAW TIGERS
WALLOP KANSANS.

LARGEST CROWD IN HISTORY
OF BIG ANNUAL GAME.

Defeat Jayhawkers In a
Great Battle 12 to 6.
Missouri Tigers Wallop the Kansas Jayhawks.
IT'S BEEN A LONG TIME SINCE HE HAS TASTED ANYTHING AS GOOD AS THAT.

Bitterly, even heroically, contesting every inch of the Tigers' invasion the Kansas Jayhawkers went down to defeat before Missouri, by a score of 12 to 6. The biggest crowd that ever witnessed a football game in Kansas City passed through the gates yesterday at Association park. Long before the park opened at 12:30, large lines of rooters were headed for the different entrances and by 1 o'clock the 200 ushers were more than busy. Many persons who were unable to get seats took advantage of the buildings in the vicinity and trees, roofs and telegraph poles were crowded. The yelling was probably the best that was ever given by the rival universities.

Even when the Jayhawkers realized that they were beaten, their spirit was not broken. With the cheer leaders who were placed in the center of the field, 2,000 students echoed their famous war cry when they knew it was of no avail.

EVERY SEAT WAS TAKEN.

By 2 o'clock, a half hour before the game started, the seats were all taken .. It was one mass of color. On the south side the crimson and blue of Kansas flaunted saucily in the light breeze, while the somber yellow and black of Missouri floated in the north bleachers. Across the high board fence in the rear of the Missouri section, the Tiger enthusiasts had stretched a long canvas on which was painted "Missouri Tigers." It was unnecessary work, for any stranger in the city could have told from the yelling that the Missouri rooters were seated in that particular section.

The K. U. contingent was the first to open hostilities in the matter of yelling. The band, twenty-four in number, gayly dressed in crimson and blue suits, marched out on the field, and commenced to play the "Boola, Boola," which brought the Kansas rooters to their feet. For fully five minutes the Kansans had their inning. The cheer leaders with frantic gestures signalled for the famous "Rock Chalk," which echoed across the field for five more minutes.

BOTH TEAMS WERE CHEERED.

The Tigers a few minutes later had their chance. Out on the Belt Line tracks on the north side of the park a snorting engine pushed a Pullman and from the entrance twenty-two men in football uniform emerged and stealthily crept toward the park. The springy step told that ten weeks' training had not been for nothing. Before the roots were hardly aware of their presence they had filed into the park through the north entrance. A cheer that could have been heard for a mile greeted the Missouri players. The military band commenced on "Dixie" and for a moment the air was one mass of yellow and black. The cheering only stopped when the team lined up for a signal practice.

The Kansas team arrived on the field at 1:45. They came through the southwest entrance and their red blankets were more than conspicuous as they raced across the gridiron. A cheer that rivaled the Tigers' greeting arose from thousands of Kansas admirers, and lasted fully as long as that given their rivals. Until the game started, promptly at 2:30 o 'clock, the two sections vied with each other in giving the yells of their respective schools. The Missouri band, to demonstrate its ability to play, marched in front of the Kansan stands and played a funeral dirge.

With this great victory goes the championship of the Missouri valley conference for 1909 and the honor of having an undefeated team for the season, the first Missouri ever had. Not only this, but it shows how superior Roper is as a coach over Kennedy, winning with an eleven lighter, no faster, but so thoroughly trained in football that it outclassed the Kansas team, especially in kicking.

This is the first battle the Missouri Tigers have won from Kansas since 1901. It is the first time Missouri has crossed the red and blue goal line since 1902. This is the fourth win for Missouri in the past nineteen years and so great was this victory that all Missouri is celebrating.

On straight football Kansas made 298 yards during the game while Missouri made but 190. On punting Missouri was the victor, making 780 yards in 21 attempts, for an average of over 37 yards to the punt, while Kansas made 465 yards in twelve attempts for an average of over 38 yards to the punt. Punting really won the game for Missouri.

STONG AND HILL MEET.

Chancellor Strong's visit to President Hill of Missouri in a neighboring box was watched with interest.

"It's too bad; you will lose," the tall Kansas chief executive greeted President Hill. Both smiled and shook hands.

"Just watch," was President Hill's rejoiner.

Mayor Crittenden occupied a box in the center of the field in front of the Missouri section. When the first score was made a few minutes after the game started the mayor threw his had in the air and yelled like a collegian. Frank Howe, who sat in the same box, was equally as demonstrative.

When the second band of rooters arrived in the city yesterday morning they maintained the same confidence that existed until the kickoff. At Thirteenth and Central streets the Missouri band started a procession which was several blocks long. Up the principal streets of the city the crowd wended its way, giving the Tiger yell. In front of the Coates, the headquarters of the Jayhawkers, the long line stopped and gave a serenade. Even the "Rock Chalk" yell wasn't able to drown out the "Tiger, Tiger, M. S. U."

TIGERS WANTED BETTING ODDS.

Though the Tigers were confident that they would win, the demanded odds and were generally successful in getting 2 to 1 money. It is thought that the boarding houses in Lawrence will have to wait for board for many weeks, for most of the K. U. students considered the proposition a joke that Missouri would win.

"Just putting your money out at good interest," was the way one K. U. man characterized it.

The crowd was especially well handled at the game. The twelve entrances provided enough room to admit ticket holders as fast as they applied for admission. After conclusion of the game there were jams at the gates, but no one was injured.

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