Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

April 22, 1907

UNITE FOR PARDON.

BUSINESS MEN ACTIVE ON BEHALF
OF C. W. ANDERSON.
PETITIONS QUICKLY SIGNED.

MASS MEETING WILL BE HELD TONIGHT ON TWELFTH.
Persons Who Did Not Know Ander-
son Are Interested in the Move-
ment to Secure His Release--
Only the President Can
Free Kansas Cityan.

Today a thousand men, representing every walk of life in Kansas City, will begin working to secure a pardon for Charles W. Anderson, who escaped from the penitentiary at Leavenworth nine years ago with but eight months of five years sentence before him for robbing a post office in Oklahoma, and was arrested here Saturday and taken back to the prison.

A mass meeting of business men who knew Anderson will be held tonight at 702 East Twelfth street with a view of securing a pardon. Petitions were circulated yesterday and one of them had forty signers within an hour after it had been drawn. Last night seventy-five names were on the list.

This petition was drawn in behalf of Anderson to be presented in connection with a petition which will be sent to President Roosevelt. Other similar petitions, to be attached to an original paper which will be presented at the meeting tonight, have been scattered about the city and the signers ask no questions. Many of them know Anderson personally and describe him as a hale fellow well met, honest and trustworthy.


THREE PETITIONS OUT.
Congressman E. C. Ellis has been invited to attend the meeting tonight and it is expected that he will be there. When asked last night what he would do for the prisoner, he said:
I have not investigated the matter as much as I should like to, but will do so tomorrow and if he is as worthy as he is said to be I will present the petition for his pardon to President Roosevelt. If the reports of him are true I will be very glad to take the matter up."
The petitions started yesterday will be given active circulation today. One of them was placed in Brooks' restaurant, 210 East Twelfth street, another at Clifford's cigar store at Twelfth street and Grand avenue, and a third, which received more signatures than the rest, in Lorber's cigar store, 317 East Twelfth street.
Lorber, who has known him in a business way for several years, says that Anderson has been prompt in his payments and that he did not hesitate at any time to trust "Charlie" for $75 or $100. In fact, when Anderson wanted to buy his partner's interest in February, a year ago, Lorber advanced the necessary money to him on Anderson's mere statement he did not have enough money to make the purchase.
"Did he pay it back?" exclaimed Lorber, almost in astonishment that the question should be asked, "Well, I should say he did. And quickly, too. And more than that, all of his payments on bills of goods were made promptly. No one questioned the honestly of Anderson."
BUSINESS RECORD HERE.
All of his friends know him as Anderson. "Charlie," they call him, and in the familiarity of the name itself they express sentiment of men who, when they know a man, know him well.
Anderson first went into business for himself at 720 East Twelfth street, April 4, 1905, in partnership with a man named Lowry, purchasing the latter's interest in the restaurant over a year ago. After running the business alone for a year and two days, he sold out, and started to look for a better location. He was always cheerful, it is said, and everyone who refers to his home life speaks of his affection for his little girl, 3 years old, and his wife.
"Is it justice to take a man who is working industriously and trying hard to succeed, back to prison for a crime committed twelve years ago?" asked a friend of his last night on a street corner where the arrest of Anderson for a forgotten robbery was the chief subject of discussion.
A number of citizens called on Charles Riehl, assistant prosecuting attorney, last night to have him draw up the petition which will be presented to President Roosevelt. It is doubtful if Kansas City ever took as much interest in the release of a prisoner as has been shown in seeking the liberation of Anderson. Not only those who knew him but men who never heard his name before are actively working for his release.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory